Deliverable 7 - Team Planning Minutes

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1 WRC Jan 2019
ATTACHMENT1 : WRCK5-2719-4;
Deliverable 7
Team planning;January 2019
Programme
Activity
Description
Timing
DAY 1
Review of deliverables
To date, Del for 2019 (PP); tease out action items
and broad discussion on how this can be achieved
(pairs)
45min - 9:30am
Progress
-CoPs and demo sites (PP)
- Assessment of process design (CCA w/s 1-5); two
small groups… what works, what doesn’t
suggested changes
1hr 11:00am
CSA practices
- CSA practices being explored; add to PP
- Summary of introduction in the three provinces,
including some indicators (PP)
- Update Community level prioritization of
practices excel sheet in small groups
45 min 12:00am
Experimentation
Finalised, in progress, planned small group work
for all provinces (using template)
1hr 1:00pm
-Indicators;
-SOIL: Conservation and health (including fertility)
-WATER: Conservation, use efficiency, availability
-LIVELIHOODS: Improvement (production,
incomes, savings) and social agency (group actions
for change)
Go through different frameworks- finalise
indicators
1hr- 3:00pm
The DSS
1hr 4:00pm
DAY 2
The DSS cont
1hr -9:30am
Action plan finalisation
Pick up on broad action plans and fill in more detail
2hr- 12:00pm
2 WRC Jan 2019
Aims
1. To evaluate and identify best practice options for CSA and Soil and Water Conservation
(SWC) in smallholder farming systems, in two bioclimatic regions in South Africa. (Output 1)
2. To amplify collaborative knowledge creation of CSA practices with smallholder farmers in
South Africa (Output 2)
3. To test and adapt existing CSA decision support systems (DSS) for the South African
smallholder context (Outputs 2,3)
4. To evaluate the impact of CSA interventions identifiedthrough the DSS by piloting
interventions in smallholder farmer systems, considering water productivity, social acceptability and
farm-scale resilience (Outpus 3,4)
5. Visual and proxy indicators appropriate for a Payment for Ecosystems based model are
tested at community level for local assessment of progress and tested against field and laboratory
analysis of soil physical and chemical properties, and water productivity (Output 5)
OUTPUTS
1. A locally relevant DSS for CSA and WSC in smallholder farming systems in South Africa
2. A choice of appropriate, tested practices and technologies for implementation at homestead and
field level across a range of bioclimatic regions
3. Baskets of options for use at community based level for introduction of concepts, awareness
raising and implementation, across a range of bioclimatic regions
4. Recommendations for appropriate knowledge mediation, learning and dissemination strategies
for CSA in smallholder farming systems5. A model for community based monitoring of CSA indicators
EXPECTED IMPACTS
1. Smallholder farmers across a range of bioclimatic regions have increased knowledge and
awareness of climate change and are able to adapt to these stresses by implementing appropriate
agricultural and water management practices.
2. Smallholder farmers are able to make informed decisions about and are able to implement a range of
climate smart agricultural practices that are best bet options for their specific socio-economic
and agro-ecological situations
3. Implementation of practices that include but are not limited to soil and water conservation
practices (including conservation agriculture), rainwater harvesting and storage for productive activities,
increased diversity in food production and inclusion of indigenous crops and plants in their farming
systems, micro climate management strategies (such as drip irrigation and small greenhouses),
integration of small livestock and agroforestry.
4. Smallholder farmers link with and are supported by local stakeholders and use the CSA decision
support frameworks for implementation and increased awareness through scaling out of practices to
other communities in and between localities
5. Smallholder farmers work together and build local platforms for joint activities related to their
improved farming systems (including savings, local value chain development and joint resource
management options)
6. Scaling out and scaling up of the CSA frameworks and implementation strategies lead to greater
resilience and food security for smallholder farmers in their locality.
3 WRC Jan 2019
Summary report; WRCteam planning22-
23 January2019
Progress : Feb
_ Met with four people with tunnels ( Phumelele, Zodwa, Ntombakhe, Nombono), decided learning group
should meet once a month and the farmer with tunnel will show and tell and share what is happening. And
discussed ownership of tunnels. The four are aware that everyone was meant to work together to share work
and harvest. ….Thombakhe said it did not work out farmers felt they were assistingher. In Ezibomvini the
farmers are still expecting their own tunnels…The four were also not clear about the experimentation and
what is expected of them… Ntombakhe, Nombono and Zodwa-don’t fill in their own monitoring forms –
someone else in the homestead does that… so they need to do it themselves -we will need to provide them
with kokis, so that they can colour in what the chameleon says… and for them assess … now they are irrigating
regardless, Even if you can’t write, they do tallying, maybe make 1’s …..
When they ask someone else to do it, they sometimes don’t do it… they do not feel involved ……… harvesting
chineses cabbage, green pepper, onions…… none have
They just record the one bucket per day, even if they’re not actually using it… next cycle 1-2 months….
We are not sure we trust what the farmers are recording, it does not look reliable…. Maybe we can do one
reading per week, the readings are not
Someone needs to be there to help with looking at the data (also runoff, and raingauge)
Problem is mainly with Ntombakhe… as her daughter wants to be paid, she is ok with doing the tallying so she
doesn’t have to rely on her daughter….
Mhlwazini Phumzile Zimba rain gauge- no=one is taking responsible…. Again issue with the lady being
illiterate and the childrennot assisting…. ACTION: Let’s remove it…. either grannies or young people, none are
reliable…
Farmers do not see enough value in the importance of the records…. They need to see how they can help
them….. we try and explain to farmers they are part of theresearch and they own the experimentation and
that the input are a part of reducing the risk….
One missing point is that the data does not go back to the people ---- WE NEED To FIND WAYS TO DO THAT
PUT MORE EMPHASIS on taking the information back to farmers.
ACTION: sharing INFORMATION ON VIA AND SHARING BETWEEN FARMERS…
ACTION: tunnels in Madzikane, Gobizembe by April
Water Issues -11 households, each contribute R1 000. …. They complained the pricing for the process was too
costly, to make it cheaper Get the TLB from the councillor to dig the ditches. (R1000 only for 6 households).
They then came up with an idea to borrow that money from their savings groups…. 1-Jo-jo tank…. Will be
ready by end of March….
Swayimane:
- 1st experiment eco-circle now mostly just herbs left. Can assess
- 2nd experiment-deep tranches shallow trenches (5x1m); bed of herbs on the side. Form for filling in
watering and harvesting, last column says chameleon reading- maybe change to make notes about
things like pestsetc… (since she doesn’t) have a chameleon We may have put too many different (
mustard spinach, leeks, lettuce, green peppers, turnips,
- 3rd experiment -tunnel - Mam Mncanyana so far only one trench ,should be finalised at the end of
the month…
- 4th exp; tower gardens (4 still need to). Rather than buying stuff and giving it to them; prepare
everything first, then we can assist with materials
Last year we gave people seed, and then it was very hard to track how to do it…
4 WRC Jan 2019
Overall Action Items
1. Need baselines for Swayimane(10), Madzikane(????), and a few more in Bergville; Samkhe, Tema,
Mazwi
2. Give attention to knowledge meditation indicators: Use the two new monitoring forms; resilience
snapshot interview form and WRC_CCA_Individual monitoring forms, for monitoring of progress in
the learning groups in all areas: Tema, Samkhe, Phumzile, Mazwi, Lawrence
3. Set up learning group workshops in Bergville around the chameleons and irrigation management and
scheduling; Phumzile, Samkhe
4. Continue to gather information on measurement for Water Productivity in Bergville (Chameleons,
runoff, rainfall, soil fertility, soil health, bulk density, gravimetric soil water, amount of watering,
amount harvested); Samkhe, Phumzile, Nonka, Lulama
5. Write and start to compile manuals
a. CCA methodology (DSS)
b. Practices; finalise summaries and visual aids and do more detailed description And
translate these summaries into Zulu, Pedi?????
c. Learning materials/ farmers handouts gardening, field cropping, livestock, natural
resources
d. Guidelines for how to set up learning networks; Lawrence
Set up a planning meeting to outline and start: Erna by 15 Feb
6. Finalise 1st draft of online DSS and design the survey. Include a land use assessment section: Erna,
Catherine van den Hoof, Matthew Evans
7. Community processes; After the first round of experimentation, go back to understanding of CC,
impacts, of practices tried out thus far and choose the next basket of practices for 2nd round of
implementation: Phumzile, Samkhe, Lulalama, Betty, Erna, (Tema, Mazwi- continue with first round
in SKZN), Lawrence monitor 2nd round in EC
8. Review sessions;For community based indicator development and assessment of impact of practices
tried thus far, including learnings making the link between research and visual indicators
9. Community process and ownership case studies;
a. Ntabamhlope and Ezibomvini tunnels one is a group activity one individual compare
and contrast pro’s and cons- Samkhe
b. Sedawa and Turkey the different styles of the LFs- in turkey nothing happens at the
homestead of the LF, always other venues and he carefully manages distribution of things
and in Sedawa most of the practices have been demonstrated at the LF’’s home and most
meetings occur there. – compare and contrast pro’s and cons- Betty
10. Cost-benefit analysis; of low and high value crops in tunnels… Erna, Betty, Samkhe
11. CSA has a weather station in Acornhoek:Erna to follow up and get data form there…
12. Natural Pest and disease control: Design and implement and “advanced” learning workshop, that
also includes disease control and starts on looking at specific pest and disease problems e.g. blight
on tomatoes, downey mildew etc. Erna, Betty and ???
13. DSS: The following action are required
a. Some form a land assessment by the farmer needs to be included e.g. erosion, lack of
water, overgrazing etc..)
b. Test this DSS with farmers in a workshop setting and
c. Work this DSS process into the WRC-CCA workshops
d. Work with farmers on a “default list of choices” for Farmer practices (similar to the one for
facilitators
e. Think through a way to link this DSS with the Amanzi for Food platform
14.
Progress in each area
AREA and
resp person
IN PROCESS
NEXT
5 WRC Jan 2019
LIMPOPO
Sedawa,
Turkey,
Lepelle,
Botshabelo,
Fenale
BETTY
Tunnel experimentation coherent records(NOT
BEING DONE but try again)
Organic marketing of herbs and veg - Continue
Water issues- Sedawa group collected R12500- want to
start on one borehole- set up with water committee.
Lepelle- Meeting with trad authority to get some
movement; Turkey Find out how far with coll of
R600/45members for 3 boreholes
Poultry production training and experimentation set
up and monitor
Organic mango production experimentation set up
and monitor
CA demo and experimentation set up and monitor
-Fenale: Shallow trenches, raised
beds, experimentation
-Lepelle; organic fruit marketing,
more training on fruit quality
Turkey: How to make and seal
small dams
Botshabelo: next round of
experimentation, CA, bucket drip
kits
Sedawa: Monthly progress and
planning meetings, set up new
markets directly with farmers,
experimentation review and
planning next round, Agroecology
network meeting in March
FINLIASE WATER ISSUES VIDEOS
KZN
Eqeleni,
Ezibomvini,
Swayimane,
Madzikane
PHUMZILE
SAMKHE
LULAMA
TEMA
MAZWI
Tunnel experimentation (3 people ) coherent records,
incl chameleon readings
Water Issues; follow up meeting
CA-Ongoing in CA SFIP project (runoff, gauges weather
station, bulk density, gravimetric soil samples, soil
fertility and soil health (including OC and aggregates,
VSAs)
Swayimane Monitoring of 1st round of gardening
implementation (Tunnel, tower gardens, trenches, eco-
circles continue with CA
Madzikane: Prioritization of practices, Run-off plots in
CA
-SBS-All areas: Modules 4-8; list of ideas (potatoes,
poultry, farer centres), resources etc
Tabampholphe: Seedling production, pest and disease
control, herbs
CA monitoring 20 participants
-Review of experimentation and
planning for next cycle include
whole learning group
-Water issues- next steps;
collection, design,
implementation
-Bglv_Monitor fodder
experimentation
-Build tunnel in Swayimane and
Madzikane
-Do exp comparing trenches,
raised beds, shallow trenches-
Swayimane
Report on impact of practices-
e.g. tower gardens (x4), etc…
-Madzikane Start first round of
experimentation in gardens,
fodder in CA
-Tabamhlophe: more formal
experiments, monitoring, impact
assessment of practices
EC
Mxhumbu,
Berlin,
Dimbaza,
Xhuzini
LAWRENCE
MAZWI
ERNA
Review of 1st round of experimentation, demos,
planning for next round
Xolise: Ca, furrow (Xhumbu)
Aviwe: trenches, eco-circles (DImbaza)
Phindiwe : tower garden, (Xhuzini
Tunnel experiment and coherent
monitoring to be set up (either w
Eddie or move the tunnel
somewhere else)
Monitoring of round 2,
experimentation per participant
what they want to do
next…additional practices ot
introduce
Knowledge mediation
Sometimes people do not work well together in learning groups. We need to give attention to how people
share or learn to share. Again, there is the case study of Amanzi for Food network in EC- where people are
enthusiastic about sharing. Why is this different to KZN and Limpopo?
6 WRC Jan 2019
We need more coherence in implementation of ideas and linking Conservation Agriculture to CSA. We need a
better understanding of farmers’ concepts of what they redoing and why they are doing it…For example
farmers understanding and terms for different soil properties, and we need to work with the Visual Soil
Assessments with farmers
Questions:
-What have we learnt about how to introduce ideas?
-About doing things in groups vs individually
-About demonstrations and farmer level experimentation
Indicators
This is to assess the overall impact of CSA practices
Already in place on project level, but now have to work on indicators for this process specifically.
Couple of different ways to look at indicators
-Innovation system indicators
-Logical framework indicators
Amanzi for Food have been using the “Value Creation Framework” for developing indicators. This was
presented by Lawrence. See attachment
Farmers’ indicators
There are some issues in our implementation model. We provide some inputs to the participants for specific
experimentation; including a few tunnels, some seed and some seedlings the latter of crops and varieties
that are new and can assist in increasing diversity and continuity of production. Participants however may not
understand this as they see some getting inputs for free and other not… ere has been some conflict related to
those who have received some assistance and those who have not. Farmers may overplay the advantages of
the tunnels as they have identified these as a practice with good income potential and many farmers want
them, but cannot pay.
Also, mostly the tunnels have been used for low value crops, such as spinach, even maize, cowpeas, etc.It
would work better if high value crops were promoted here Cost benefit analysis is important, and a
coherent experiment with something of high value e.g. strawberries, herbs,
OPTIONS
-Experiment only with things that don’t cost money as farmers cannot afford…. Here we could lose out
on some of the interesting things coming out of some of the ideas (tunnels, drip kits, small dams, new
varieties, tower gardens, chicken tractors, natural pest and disease control brews…)
-Spend more time on reviewing the experimentation process and clear explanation of inputs provided.
Work with learning groups to create the criteria of who gets and who does not and confirm with them
that this is acceptable to them
-Any risks for the farmers need to be articulated more clearly
-Talk through financing options for some of the new ideas; working this into the VSLAs and the SBS
trainings
--Write up the different models and outcomes;
oIn Ntabampholphe the tunnel expeimrentation is done in a group rather than individual
setting these two processes can be ocmapred nad contrasted
oIn turkey, the LF does not do anything at his own homestead, unlike Sedawa for example,
and brings the group together in other venues. These two processes can be comapred
The Computer based DSS
The first draft of the model was presented and discussed (DSS PP model presentation).
7 WRC Jan 2019
COMMENTS
-Some form a land assessment by the farmer needs to be included e.g. erosion, lack of water,
overgrazing etc..)
-Test this DSS with farmers in a workshop setting and
-Work this DSS process into the WRC-CCA workshops
-Work with farmers on a “default list of choices” for Farmer practices (similar to the one for
facilitators
It is considered an important outcome that this model can survive the end of the project and thatindividual
farmers can use this model by themselves.
It is also a good support process for facilitators decide on/choose a basket of options for any particular
situation where they are interacting with a farmer.
On the Web based platforms these baskets of options of practices are to link to the practice summaries (1
pagers with a brief description and photographs) and these in turn are linked to more detailed informationon
each practice (manuals, farmer handouts…)
Lawrence introduced the Amanzi for Food navigation tool
There are many similarities in these two processes; some of the criteria for the Amanzi for food tool such as
size of land (gardens small fields, large fields), labour, skill, cost are the same across the two processes and
many of the practices overlap As they have already been described (info cards) and refer to the manuals for
more detailed information, a combination of these processes is a good idea
ACTION: Think through a way to link this DSS with the Amanzi for Food platform
Indicators
Indicators and monitoring forms used to date have been those developed for the two “sister “ programmes
that feed into this research process; namely the Maize trust CA programme and the AWARD Climate change
adaptation programme.
We discussed potential monitoring frameworks; including the logical framework process that is presently a
part of the proposal (with output, outcome/impact and process indicators.
Indicators are on three levels that link to each other
1. Farmer based indicators
2. Visual indicators and processes (e.g. such the visual Soil Assessment process)
3. Quantitative measurement of certain indicators, including benchmarks (e.g. soil fertility, soil health,
runoff, evapotranspiration…)
Lawrence gave a brief presentation the Value Creationframework:
-Immediate value (e.g access to information , group formation, collaborative activities)
-Potential value (e.g. enhanced understanding, increased agency, using new knowledge in own
context, establishing connections, outcomes of activities, increased ability to learn
-Applied value (e.g. Information used to inform changes….
-Realized value (e.g. productivity, productive collaborations, adaptation of elements)
-Reframing value (e.g. Previous definitions of success, changes in definitions and reasons for changes)
-
An assessment of indicators for this programme was done, using the outcomes/impacts from the proposal as a
starting point.
The team were asked to go point by point and consider what needs to be monitored and to suggest possible
indicators for each point. Below is a summary
What to monitor
Indicator
8 WRC Jan 2019
Knowledge
Awareness
Adaptation
Implementation
Increased knowledge:
Increased understanding of climate change and
impacts
Adaptation:
1.Reasons for choosing practices (justification)
2. Increased water productivity, water saving,
irrigation efficiency
Implementation: No of practices implemented
using five finger principles
Decision making
Implementation
Decision making: Community level indicators for
choice of adaptation strategies across five
fingers
Implementation: as above plus
3. Local best bet options, traditional practices
Range of practices
1.Qualitative and quantitative indicators for
increased sol fertility, soil health, water
infiltration, water holding capacity, water
productivity, increased food production,
increased income, increased diversity (no of
crops, trees, - incl indigenous)
2. increased RWH practices and storage for
productive purposes (no of people, different
types)
3.Diversity across five fingers (how many people
implement how many practices ea)
4. Quality of implementation; how many, how
well assessment of ea practices for how well it
works to build resilience*.
5. Social responsiveness; which practices
favoured locally with reasons
Networks, CoPs,
groups, platforms
Awareness and use
of DSS
1.No of groups, networks, CoPs
2. Stakeholder involvement; meetings,
workshops conferences, collaboration
3. Sharing of learning… ??
4. No of people that know about and use DSS…?
5. Involvement of more people, local expansion,
(neighbours)
Local platforms
1. Membership
2. Joint activities undertaken in local platforms
(incl VSLAs (money used for productive activities
etc), SBS, farmer centres, joint work, planning
and action for communal resource
management) variety of activities engaged in
9 WRC Jan 2019
Same as 4
Resistance to
shocks and stresses
and
Recovering from
shocks and stresses
Increased diversity in farming
Increased productivity
Increased diversity
Increased water use efficiency (incl RWH, water
holding, water access, water productivity)
Increased livelihood security (food, income)
Increased livelihood diversity/options
Savings (safety, security, achievement)
Increased growing season
Collaborative actions/social agency
Informed decision making
Positive mindsets
Indicator
Questions to ask (group discussions, dialogue, individual interviews)
PROCESS INDICATORS
Knowledge mediation: Working with
information and ideas so that people can
understand in their own context
(understanding, use and adaptation of
information)
What, why how questions
What have you learnt and how have you learnt it
What information has been useful (training, sharing verbally, showing,
pictures, written information)
Information sources…
Put is in your own words
How can you use it or change it
Resilience
Increased diversity in farming
Increased productivity
Increased diversity
Increased water use efficiency (inclRWH,
water holding, water access, water
productivity)
Increased livelihood security (food, income)
Increased livelihood diversity/options
Savings (safety, security, achievement)
Increased growing season
Collaborative actions/social agency
Informed decision making
Positive mindsets
Adaptation capacity ?
Social responsiveness?
FOR THIS WE NEED A BEFORE AND AFTER SNAPSHOT
SEE THE NEW SNAPSHOT FORM ATTACHED
OUTCOME INDICATORS
Increased knowledge:
Increased understanding of climate change
and impacts
Adaptation: Reasons for choosing practices
(justification)
Implementation:
Do you know what CC is. (W/S 1)
What is your understanding of CC (W/S 1)
Describe impacts of CC (W/S1)
How has your understanding changed?
What adaptation strategies will help? Within which resource categories
(five fingers) (W/S2)+….
10 WRC Jan 2019
-No of practices implemented using five
finger principles
-Local best bet options, traditional practices
Local/traditional practices in CCA; what are they, do you implement
these, why or why not (W/s/ 2 + …..
Choice of practices; group and individual, using five fingers (W/S 3,
garden monitoring forms, CA crop growth monitoring +……
Reasons for each choice (W/s/3-matrix +……..
Decision making: Community level
indicators for choice of adaptation
strategies across five fingers
What would success look like?
What criteria would you use (from adaptive strategies, through to
individual practices using five fingers)
How would you observe or measure each criteria/indicator?.
Are there changes in how we define success
Short medium and long term indications
1.Qualitative and quantitative indicators for
increased sol fertility, soil health, water
infiltration, water holding capacity, water
productivity, increased food production,
increased income, increased diversity (no of
crops, trees, - incl indigenous)
2. increased RWH practices and storage for
productive purposes (no of people,
different types)
3. Increased water productivity, water
saving, irrigation efficiency
3.Diversity across five fingers (how many
people implement how many practices ea)
4. Quality of implementation; how many,
how well assessment of ea practices for
how well it works to build resilience*.
5. Social responsiveness; which practices
favoured locally with reasons
1.No of groups, networks, CoPs
2. Stakeholder involvement; meetings,
workshops conferences, collaboration
3. Sharing of learning… ??
4. No of people that know about and use
DSS…?
5. Involvement of more people, local
expansion, (neighbours)
1. Membership
2. Joint activities undertaken in local
platforms (incl VSLAs (money used for
productive activities etc), SBS, farmer
centres, joint work, planning and action for
communal resource management) variety
of activities engaged in
11 WRC Jan 2019
Gardening
Field cropping (Conservation
Agriculture)
Livestock management
Finalised and in
progress:
Measurements?
-Tunnels; water productivity, water
holding capacity, trench beds, bucket
drip kits, cost-benefit (qual and quant)
-Bed design options; deep and shallow
trenches, raised beds, ridges and
furrow, eco-circles (qual)
-Mulching; in different circumstances
(qual)
-Greywater management; tower
gardens, ash, bucket filters, (qual)
-Diversified cropping; Intercropping, crop
rotation, cover crops, crop varieties,
drought tolerance (quan, qual)
-Planting systems; planters, spacing,
tramlines, early and late planting, (quan,
qual)
-Weeding; chemical, mechanical
-Soil and water conservation; fertility (incl
liming), health, run-off, infiltration,
compaction, water holding, soil cover
(quan, qual)
-Productivity; Yields, biomass, (quan, qual)
-Livelihoods impact; Food, sales, fodder,
financial management, group actions,
business development (quan, qual)
-Value chain; inputs subsidies, cost-
benefit, milling, farmer centres, LED (qual)
-Fodder crop options; WCC, SCC
in CA system – cut and carry, in
situ, hay….(qual)
-Poultry: Chicken tractors,
growing feed for poultry,
multipurpose breeds