CCA Ref Group Meeting 4

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Progress
July 2020
WATER RESEARCH COMMISSION
PROJECT: K5/2719/4
COLLABORATIVE KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND MEDIATION
STRATEGIES FOR THE DISSEMINATION OF
WATER AND SOIL CONSERVATION PRACTICES
AND CLIMATE SMART AGRICULTURE
IN SMALLHOLDER FARMING SYSTEMS
Mahlathini Development Foundation (MDF)
Erna Kruger
Mazwi Dlamini (UWC student)
Temakholo Mathebula
Phumzile Ngcobo
Betty Maimela
Institute of Natural Resources NPC (INR)
Jon McCosh/ Brigid Letty
Rhodes University Environmental Learning Research Centre (RU-ELRC)
Lawrence Sisitka
Rural Integrated Engineering (Pty) Ltd (RIEng)
Christiaan Stymie
Palesa Motaung (student at University of Pretoria)
PROJECT TEAM
1.To evaluateandidentifybestpractice options forCSAandSoilandWater Conservation
(SWC) in smallholder farming systems, in two bioclimatic regions in South Africa. (Output 1)
2. To amplify collaborative knowledge creation of CSA practices with smallholder farmers in South
Africa (Output 2)
3. To test and adapt existing CSA decision support systems (DSS) for the South African
smallholder context (Outputs 2,3)
4. To evaluate the impact of CSA interventions identified through the DSS by piloting
interventions in smallholder farmer systems, considering water productivity, social acceptability
and farm-scale resilience (Outputs 3,4)
5. Visual and proxy indicators appropriate for a Payment for Ecosystems based model are
tested atcommunity levelfor local assessmentofprogressand tested against field and laboratory
analysis of soil physical and chemical properties, and water productivity (Output 5)
AIMS
¡A
choice of appropriate, tested practices and technologies
for
implementation at homestead and field level across a range of bioclimatic
regions
¡A
locally relevant decision support system
(DSS) for implementing CSA and
SWC practices in smallholder farming systems in South Africa
¡
Baskets of options
for use at
community level
for introduction of concepts,
awarenessraisingand implementation,across arangeofbioclimatic
regions
¡
Recommendationsforappropriateknowledge mediation, learning and
dissemination strategies
for CSA in smallholder farming systems
¡
A model for community based monitoring of CSA indicators
.
OUTPUTS
DELIVERABLES
8
Report
:
Appropriate
quantitative measurement
procedures
for verification
of
the
visual indicators.
Set
up farmer and researcher level experimentation.Link proxies
and
benchmarks
to quantitative research to verify and formalise.
Explore
potential
incentive schemes and financing mechanisms Conduct survey
of
present
knowledge mediation processes in community and
smallholder
settings
1
August 2019
9
Interim
report:results of
pilots,
season
2
Pilot
chosen collaborative strategies for introduction of arange of CSA
and
WSC
strategies, working with the CoPs in each site and the decisions
support
system
.Create knowledge mediation productions, manuals, handouts
and
other
resources necessary for learning and implementation.
31 January
2020
FINANCIAL
YEAR 2020/2021
10
Final
report:Results of
pilots,
season
3
Pilot
chosen collaborative strategies for introduction of arange of CSA
and
WSC
strategies, working with the CoPs in each site and the decisions
support
system
.Create knowledge mediation productions, manuals, handouts
and
other
resources necessary for learning and implementation.
1
May 2020
11
Final
Report:Consolidation
and
finalisation
of decision
support
system
Finalisation
of criteria and practices, introduction of new ideas
and
innovations,
updating of decision support system
3
July 2020
¡The table summarises the
sites, number of participants
and farmer level
experimentation undertaken
with each village learning
group, over a period of three
years.
COMMUNITIES OF PRACTICE; COMMUNITY LEVEL
2017/18
2018/19
2019/20
harvesting
useefficiency
improvement
mixed cropping
integratedweed
and pest
management
Livestock
integration
Mam etja,
Limpopo
Sedawa, Turkey,
Willows,Botshabelo,
Santeng
108 7865xxxx x x x xxx
Bergville,
KwaZulu-
Natal
Ezibomvini, Stulwane,
Eqeleni, Mhlwazini,
65 6850xx x x x x xxx
Southern
KwaZulu-
Natal
Madzikane, Ofafa,
Spring Valley
32 2522xx x x x x xxx
Midlands ,
KwaZulu-
Natal
Gobizembe,
Mayizekanye, Ozwathini
27 2841xx x x x x xxx
Eastern
Cape
Xumbu, Berlin, Qhuzini,
Dimbaza
18 1545xx xx
Village
Area
*Thisis asimplified categorisation of pratices, as most contributeto
several objectives.
livestock
resilience
Number of
participants
water
Soil
crop/treeresilience
ClimateResilientAgriculturepractices tried*
¡A series of loose-standing reports
printed and posted on web
platform
§Project summary and recommendations
§Facilitationmanual
§CRA implementation reports
§Intensive homestead food production
§Wateraccess
§Field cropping and livestock integration
§Qualitative and quantitative indicators
§FarmerHandouts(English,Zulu,Pedi,
Xhosa)
§Watermanagement
§Soil management
§Crop management
§Livestock integration
FINAL REPORT
1.1SHADE CLOTH TUNNELS/NETE YA MORITI
40% yadi nete tsa moriti tsao lekana 4.2mx6m,2m o ya godimo di agiwa ka o berekiša didiriswa tse di itšego
digwetšagang mo gae. Ditšhipi a dirilwe ka pphaepe ee kobilweng ka motšeko. Ditšhipi epelwamobunggo
gona go beiwa godima ga ditshipi gotla go kgona go roka netegodimo. Nete e ya kgwatliswa ka mahlakoreng
kamoka.
ka gare ga nete ya moriti ke mebete ye meraro 1m x
5m yeo ele gorego o mongwe le o mongwe ona le 20L
ya kgamelo ya go rothiša meetse. Mokgwa wa go
bjala ka go tšwaka dibjalo o somisiwa ka gare ga nete
ya moriti le go šomiša meetse a a hlokišitsweng a
gona go bereka ka neteng ya moriti.
Dinete tša meriti di šwanetse mafelong ohle mo temo
e kgonegang, Melete ya epiwa ebile tsa go nosetša di
gona go fihlelwa.
DIDIRISWA
2 Dirapa
3 <0,1ha,
4 Gadi bitši thata, gae battle bokgoni, goithuta le bohlahli
5 Gae hloke hlokomelo thata
UPDATED TOC FOR FINAL REPORT
CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION FOR SMALLHOLDER FARMERS IN SOUTH AFRICA:
AN IMPLEMENTATION AND DECISION SUPPORT GUIDE
Chap no
Chapter Name and description
Progress (July 2020)
% completion
1
Summary of research process and recommendations
Separate report
0%
2
Research process and methodology
2.1
Methodological underpinnings
In facilitation manual
100%
2.2
Process considerations
2.3
The Innovation Systems Model
3
Results: Climate Resilient Agriculture (CRA) implementation
3.1
CRA Implementation: Intensive Homestead Food production
Separate report
100%
3.2
CRA Implementation: Water access
Separate report
100%
3.3
CRA Implementation: Field cropping and livestock integration
Separate report
30%
3.4
CRA Implementation: Participatory monitoring and evaluation. Process and
indicators
Separate report
0%
4
Results: CRA smallholder farmer decision support system (DSS)
4.1
The facilitator
-farmer DSS
In facilitation manual and DSS web
platform
100%
4.2
The individual farmer DSS
4.3
CRA practices: Summary
4.4
Publications
5
Facilitation and Learning materials
5.1
CCA
-DSS facilitation manual
Community CCA Facilitation manual
85%
5.2
Farmer level learning materials: Water management, soil management, crop
management and livestock integration (English, Zulu, Pedi, Xhosa)
On DSS web platform
85%
CSA IMPLEMENTATION SUMMARIES: LIMPOPO 2019-2020
1 CA intercropping
2. Harvesting trad crops; sorghum, jugo
beans
3. S&W conservation; stone lines
4. Check dams
5. Shallow trench beds
6. Small dams (lined with bentonite)
7. Mango production; pruning, fertilization
8. Water committees; drilling boreholes
1234 5
678
CSA IMPLEMENTATION SUMMARIES: KZN 2019-2020
1. Trench beds and tunnel in Gobizembe
2. Mixed cropping mulching and chameleons
3. Tower gardens in Ezibomvini
4. Fodder supplementation in Bergville
5. Green manure cover crops in Bergville
6. Seed saving in Bergville
7. Spring protection in Bergville and
8. Local water committee reticulation to 9 households
12345
678
CSA IMPLEMENTATION SUMMARIES: EC 2019-2020
1.CA; ripping of highly compacted soil prior to no–till planting
2. CA; basin and furrow planting demonstration for Fort Cox ATI learners
3. Natural pest and disease control ingredients for brews
4. Building of a shade cloth tunnel in Xhukwane
5. Tower garden in Quzini
1
234
5
QUANTITATIVE MEASUREMENTS
Parameter
Instruments
Dates
Evapotranspiration
(Et0)
Davis
weather station
ongoing
Soil
moisture
Chameleon water
sensors
On
going
Amount
of water applied
Measuring
cylinder
On
going
Rainfall
Rain
gauge
On
going
Weighing
of the harvest
Weighing
scale
On
going
Rand
value of the harvest
Local
market price
At
harvest
Table 1 : Measurements taken for the gardening trials
Parameter
Instruments
Dates
Evapotranspiration
(Et0)
Davis
weather station
ongoing
Soil
moisture
Gravimetric
soil water samples
4
xin growing season
Bulk
density
Sampling
Once
towards end of the season
Soil
fertility
Sampling
for analysis at CEDARA
soil
Lab
End
of growing season
Soil
health
Sampling
for analysis by Soil
Health
Solutions
End
of growing seaosn
Rainfall
Rain
gauges installed in 5sites
On
going
Infiltration
Single
and double ring infiltrometers
Once
during the season
Run
-off
Run
-off plots installed in three sites
On
going
Weighing
of the harvest
Weighing
scale, including grain
and
biomass
(lab analysis)
At
end of growing season-
for
Maize
only
Rand
value of harvest
Local
market price
At
harvest
Table2:Measurementstakenforthefieldcroppingtrials
¡Rainfall, run off, gravimetric soil water content, soil fertility and soil health tested
in this season. Below is a selection of the results
RESULTS CONSERVATION AGRICULTURE 2018-2019
Cont
M+B Lablab M+BM+CP MaizeSCC Veld Beans
only M+B M+CPSCC Veld CA
Cont M
Ezibomvini Stulwane
Total 2,9 3,2 3,6 4,5 3,6 5,3 5,8 5,6 4,9 6,0 6,1 7,5 5,0
0,0
2,0
4,0
6,0
8,0
%OM
% Organic Matter; Bergville 2018
¡Three 5th year participantsfromEzibomvini andStulwane respectively
§% OM is highest for SCC plots, followed by M+CP and then M+B
§Carbon sequestration in these CA mixed crop plots is between 0,75-1,5t/hamorethanthesingle crop
plots
§Overall carbon sequestration is on average around 2-3t/ha for CA plots
CA 2018-2019
CONTINUED
Conv
C SP
Labla
bMM+B M+CPSCC Veld M+CP SCC Veld
Ezibomvini Ndunwanne
Average of Soil aggregates25,0 32,0 45,0 25,3 31,5 27,0 42,0 46,5 45,0 40,0
Average of Soil health
calculation (new)10,5 13,17,612,6 16,2 14,2 17,7 21,2 17,5 10,9
Average of CO2 - C, ppm C49,768,524,782,3126,2 129,6 137,0 195,7 143,763,6
0,0
50,0
100,0
150,0
200,0
250,0
Soil Health scores compared to soil aggregates and CO2-C for
Ezibomvini and Ndunwana 2018-2019
¡Soil health scores (CO2
respiration organic C and
N factors) are higher for
CA multi-crop options
than conventionally tilled
maize and mono-cropped
plots across two villages
in Bergville
¡Plots under a maize and
cowpea intercrop or a
SCC mix show the
highest soil health
scores
CA 2018-2019 CONTINUED
¡Overall, the gravimetric soil
water content of the CA
trials are somewhat lower
than the CA control plots.
Multi-cropping options use
more water than a
monocropping option.
¡There is also an indication
that the multi-cropping led
todecreasedwater
availabilityduringthe
vegetative growth phase for
the 2018-2019 season,
which could in turn affect
the maize yields for the
season.
30 60 90 12
030 60 90 12
030 60 90 12
030 60 90 12
030 60 90 12
0
Planting Establishment Vegetative Productive Harvesting
CA control0,6 0,5 0,4 0,1 0,7 0,3 0,3 0,10,1 0,1 0,1 0,0 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1
CA trial0,1 0,1 0,2 0,1 0,6 0,4 0,2 0,1 0,0 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,2 0,2 0,2 0,1 0,1 0,0 0,0
Conv control0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,10,1 0,0 0,10,1 0,6 0,0 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1
0,00
0,10
0,20
0,30
0,40
0,50
0,60
0,70
0,80
AVE GRAV WATER G/G
Phumelele Hlongwane 30-120cm; 2018-2019
¡Intercropping and use
of cover crops is very
important for building
soil fertility and soil
health
¡Crop rotation aids in
stabilising high soil
health scores over time
¡The more crops you use
and rotate the better
¡Having legumes in the
mix speeds up the
process
Crop diversity is
crucial
Crop rotation in
combination with crop
diversity supports this
process
Lab-Lab and SCC
provide for very high
organic C and N values
Lower C:N ratios are
foundincropmixes
that contain legumes
cowpeas, Lab-Lab
LEARNINGS SUMMARY FROM RESULTS
Late season cover crop mix – saia oats, fodder rye,
fodder radish -
Evaluating soil health of smallholder
maize monocrops and intercrops using
qualitative and quantitative soil quality
assessment methods (Palesa Motaung _M
Soil Science-UP)
¡The VSA methodology was compared with two
quantitative soil quality scoring frameworks;
Cornell soil quality index (SQI)) and Soil
Management Assessment Framework (SMAF)
SQ index
¡Correlation analyses revealed that the VSA is
only weakly correlated to both the Cornell SQI
and the SMAF
¡The VSA over-emphasis soil physical qualities
over biologicalandchemical qualities.These
are also the least dependent on farmer
management
OUTCOME: It is not feasible to use visual proxies
in stead of quantitative resultsas bench marks
BUT there is value in using visual assessments
for gauging progress
BENCHMARKS, VISUAL PROXIES LATEST RESULTS
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5
Maizeonly under SeasonalRotation2,396,26,311,3 13,0
Maize+Beans (Intercropping)42,2 55,9 87,6 17,7 26,5
Veld (Benchmark)10,68,4 2,0 5,5 2,7
-40,0
-20,0
0,0
20,0
40,0
60,0
80,0
100,0
Soil P (ppm)
Replicates
SOIL P
Maize only under Seasonal RotationMaize + Beans (Intercropping)Veld(Benchmark)
25,8ppm 46ppm 5,8ppm
¡Waterproductivitywascalculatefor
3 consecutive seasons for 8
participants in KZN and Limpopo
RESULTS GARDENING 2019-2020
¡WP calculations using the scientific method
are between 10% and 20% higher than those
calculated using the amount of water
applied (irrigation, plus rainwater) only
¡WP is 24-35% higher inside the shade
tunnels, for all crops tested thus far
(spinach, green pepper and Chinese
cabbage)
¡Crop yields inside tunnels are between 22%
to 250%higher thanoutside
¡Yield differences for cool season leafy crops
such as spinach (swiss chard) and Chinese
cabbage are the most pronounced inside and
outside the shade cloth tunnels. These crops
yield much better within the more protected
environment of the tunnels. These
differences are also the most pronounced in
the hot summer months.
Water
Productivity:Phumelele Hlongwane (September 2019-February 2020)
Scientific
method
Farmers'
method
Plot
Crop
Yield
per
plot
(
5x1m) (kg)
Water
use
(m3
)
WP
(kg/m
3)
Yield
per
plot
(
5x1m) (kg)
Water
use
(m3
)
WP
(kg/m
3)
Tunnel
Green
pepper
30
,1
0
,7
46
,5
30
,1
0
,5
37
,8
Trench
(outside)
Green
pepper
24
,6
0
,7
34
,5
24
,6
0
,5
31
,1
Tunnel
Spinach
49
,0
0
,7
73
,7
49
,0
0
,5
62
,4
Trench
(outside)
Spinach
19
,6
0
,7
29
,1
19
,6
0
,5
26
,4
RESILIENCE SNAPSHOTS CSA/CRA IMPLEMENTATION;
Resilience
indicators
Increase
for Limpopo (N=26)
Increase
for KZN (N=12)
Comment
Increase
in size of farming activities
Gardening
1%
Field
cropping;-98%
Livestock
; 6%
Gardening
18%
Field
cropping 63%
Livestock
31%
Cropping
areas measured, no of livestock assessed
Dryland
cropping in Limpopo has reduced significantly due
to
drought
conditions and infertile soil
Increased
farming activities
No
No
All
involved in gardening, field cropping and
livestock
management
Increased
season
Yes
Yes
For
field cropping and gardening-autumn and winter options
Increased
crop diversity
Crops
:21 new crops
Practices
:11 new practices
Crops
:12 new crops
Practices
: 8 new practices
Management
options include;drip irrigation, tunnels, no-
till
planters,
JoJo tanks, RWH drums,
Increased
productivity
Gardening
;120%
Field
cropping:15%
Livestock
: 6%
Gardening
:72%
Field
cropping:79%
Livestock
:25%
Based
on increase in yields (mainly from tunnels and
trench
beds
for gardening
CA
for field cropping
Increased
water use efficiency
45
%
25
%
Access,
RWH, water holding capacity and irrigation
efficiency
rated
Increased
income
13
%
13
%
Based
on average monthly incomes, mostly though
marketing
of
produce locally and through the organic marketing system
Increased
household food provisioning
Vegetables
; 7 types~10kg/week
Fruit
; 5-10kg/week
Dryland
crops (maize, legumes,
sweet
potatoes)
; 5-10kg/week
Maize
;20kg/week
Vegetables
; 7kg/ week
Food
produced and consumed in the household
Increased
savings
Not
applicable
R
150/month
Average
of savings now undertaken
Increased
social agency
2
2
Learning
groups and local water committees
Increased
informed decision making
5
5
Own
experience, local facilitators, other farmers,
facilitators,
extension
officers
Positive
mindsets
2
2
More
to much more positive about the future:Much
improved
household
food security and food availability
PARTICIPATORYIMPACTASSESSMENT;LIMPOPO(2-3YEARS
OF CRA IMPLEMENTATION)
We have learnt about
agroecology, building soil, new
crops, value adding and
processing and marketing.
Hunger has decreased
Indigenous crops
and
trees
Soil
health
Income
Productivity
Water
use
and
management
Knowledge sharing
with
other
farmers
Total
Conservation
Agriculture
21
25
19
25
23
25
138
Livestock
integration
10
19
20
15
15
23
102
Market
10
0
19
19
20
19
87
Tunnel
15
23
20
25
25
25
133
Trench
beds
24
25
23
25
25
25
147
Drip
kits
10
15
18
23
25
25
116
Mulching
23
25
22
23
23
25
141
We work together
and also share
seeds
We now use CA in our
cropping instead of
using our old system,
and the results are
good
We know the
importance of saving
water and protecting
the soil and the
environment.
We have learnt about
integration of livestock and
farming and have seen the
results, now we have our own
livestock to avoid buying
manure to use for soil fertility
We knew nothing about
Climate Change and we felt
defeated. Now with CRA we
have gardens for
consumption and are making
small incomes from sales.
Individual (computer
model) and
Facilitated
DSS OUTLINE
PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT: Climate and
geographical parameters; GPS coordinates,
agroecological zones, soil texture, slope and soil
organic carbon content
PRACTICES: Database of CSA practices including; managing
available water, improving access to water, controlling soil
movement, improving soil health and fertility, crop management,
integrated crop-livestock management, veld management and
veld rehabilitation
¡The draft interface of the decision support
tool wasdeveloped by MatthewEvans
¡Postedona webplatform (still to be
decided once finalised, but presently
available on the MDFwebsite at
https://dss.mahlathini.org )
¡System Flexibility
§The DSS input data is simply stored in an Excel
spreadsheet. This makes it easy for maintainers
to add new practices or update existingones in
an interface that is familiar to them. Practice
information can be easily added and updated,
and is stored in a simple JSON format defined in
a JSON schema file.
§Due to the use of enumerations, the values used
in the survey questions are the exact values
used in calculations. The values can be changed
at any time and will not affect the rest of the
system, making it easy to make changes.
§Angular provides a modular framework, meaning
more features can be added or changed at a
later stage.
¡
Technologiesused
§Angular 7: Angular is an industry-standard JavaScript
framework developed and maintained by Google. It is
widely-supported and provides a solid foundation for
web-based applications.
§Openlayers
:
Openlayers is a free, open source map
layer rendering system. It is efficient and powerful, and
provides the necessary functionality to render and
interact with the map in the system.
§Custom GIS systems
§html2canvas, jspdf
¡TwoexternalAPIsarebeingused:
§OpenStreetMaps Nominatim provides a simple API for
querying locations by name, allowing the user to search
for map locations.
§Google Maps Satellite tiles hybrid(photo withvector
overlay)maptiles for themap
DSS E-SURVEY
¡s
¡s
PRACTICES; 1 PAGERS UPDATED
15 NEW SLIDES UPDATED FROM LEARNING PROCESSES AND EXPERIMENTATION
SMALL DAMS, CROP ROTATION, IMPROVED ORGANIC MATTER, PLANTING LEGUMES
GREEN MANURES, STRIP CROPPING, GRASSED WATER WAYS, ZAI PITS, CREEP
FEEDING AND SUPPLEMENTATION, STALL FEEDING AND HAY MAKING,WATER
ACCESS,MANGOPRODUCTION
¡
Publications:
§3 articles for the Water Wheel
§CABI book chapter: CA Innovation Systems build climate resilience for smallholder farmers in South
Africa
¡
Visits and stakeholder forums:
§Maize trust board to CAprojectsin Bergville
§Agroecology network open day: Value adding andprocessing inSedawa Limpopo
§CA stakeholder forums; cover crops, strip cropping and mechanisation in KZN (Ozwathini and
Madzikane)
¡
Webinars:(January-June 2020)
§DATE:17June 2020.Host;AWARD.Title;Buildingnetworksandskillsforclimatechangepreparedness
with small-scale farmers in the Olifants’ River Catchment. Section presentation by E Kruger;
Agroecology learning,mentoring, monitoringand networkingfor smallholder farmersinthe Lower
Olifants’.
§DATE:19June2020:Host;TheIntegraTrust.Title;Heal theland,healthepeople.Sectionpresentation
by E Kruger; COVID-19, climate change resilience and regenerative agriculture in smallholder farming
systems.’
¡
Presentations (June 2019-December 2019):
§Virtual Irrigation Academy presentation at UP (Using chameleon sensors in water productivity
assessments)
§NRVF workshop and presentation in Gauteng (DARDLEA and UCT)
§Presentation at Howard College Symposium on partnerships for climate resilience (UKZN)
§A joint presentation with KZNDARD on climate change adaptation success stories for theOkahlamba
land and agriculture summit.
¡
Collaboration:
§QTCO pre-scoping event for development of an Agroecology curriculum at UJ
§Collaboration with the INR in the uMkhomazi Restoration Project, (Umgeni water, KZN
§Collaboration with a GEF5 funded programme at Rhodes University, assisting with development of a
framework for vulnerability assessments and
§Incorporation of the model into the Resilient Water Programme implementation framework
PUBLICATIONS
AND
NETWORKING
¡
Progress with theses: Thesis finalisation
§Palesa Motaung: M Agric -University of Pretoria. Evaluating the restorative effect of
conservation agriculture on the degraded soils of the upper Drakensburg area of Bergville,
KwaZulu-Natal using qualitative versus quantitative soil health indicators
First draft submitted in December 2019. Finalised corrections May 2020
¡
Progress: Field work and initial draft of results
§Mazwi Dlamini: MPhil -UWC_PLAAS. Factorsinfluencingtheadoptionandnon-adoption of
Conservation Agriculture in smallholder farming systems, and the implications of these for
livelihoods and food security in Bergville, Kwazulu-Natal
Still in process of writing up and analysing results. He will re-register for 2021 once there is
more clarity on whether further field work will be required.
CAPACITYBUILDING
WORKPLAN2020
FINANCIAL YEAR 2020
12
Final report
- Summarise and
disseminate recommendations for
best practice options.
Summarise and disseminate recommendations
for best practice options for
knowledge mediation and CSA and SWC techniques for prioritized bioclimatic
regions
7 August 2020
Activities
Process
-Finalisation of last round of farmer level experimentation by July 2020
-Finalisation of manuals:
Farmer Handouts : translation (isiXhosa, SePedi)
Web platform for DSS (reports, materials, publications, online survey)
Monitoring and
Evaluation
-Final reports for:
CRA implementation: Field cropping and livestock integration
Qualitative and Quantitative indicators for CRA and
Project summary and recommendations for future implementation
Project finalisation
-Design and layout of cover pages and final reports
-Submission to WRC, for final edits, report numbers and publication
-Final report acceptance, updating of web platform, project closure