CCA Ref Group Meeting 2

Download PDF
Progress
May2018
WATERRESEARCHCOMMISSION
PROJECT:K5/2719/4
COLLABORATIVEKNOWLEDGECREATIONANDMEDIATION
STRATEGIESFORTHEDISSEMINATIONOF
WATERANDSOILCONSERVATIONPRACTICES
ANDCLIMATESMARTAGRICULTURE
INSMALLHOLDERFARMINGSYSTEMS
Mahlathini DevelopmentFoundation (MDF)
ErnaKruger
SylvesterSelala(UKZNstudent)
Mazwi Dlamini (UWC student)
Khethiwe Mthethwa (UKZN student)
Temakholo Mathebula
InstituteofNaturalResourcesNPC(INR)
JonMcCosh
RhodesUniversityEnvironmentalLearningResearchCentre(RU-ELRC)
LawrenceSisitka
RuralIntegratedEngineering(Pty)Ltd(RIEng)
ChristiaanStymie
Palesa Motaung (studentatUniversityofPretoria)
PROJECTTEAM
Whatarepeoplethinking
andhowdoesthisaffect
theiradaptationandmitigationstrategies
toclimatechange?
Whichpractisesdo
smallholderfarmersimplement,
howandwhy,
inordertocopewithormitigate
theeffectsofclimatechange?
RESEARCHQUESTIONS
Interactions within and between environmental, social, economic and political
factors in coping with climate change are to be embedded in the process.
A choiceofappropriate,testedpracticesandtechnologiesfor
implementationathomesteadandfieldlevelacrossarangeofbioclimatic
regions
A locallyrelevantdecisionsupportsystem(DSS)forimplementingCSAand
SWCpracticesinsmallholderfarmingsystemsinSouthAfrica
Basketsofoptionsforuseatcommunitylevelforintroductionofconcepts,
awarenessraisingandimplementation,acrossarangeofbioclimatic
regions
Recommendationsforappropriateknowledgemediation,learningand
disseminationstrategiesforCSAinsmallholderfarmingsystems
AmodelforcommunitybasedmonitoringofCSAindicators.
OUTPUTS
DELIVERABLES
N
o
Deliverable Description
Target date
FINANCIAL YEAR 2017/2018
1
Report: Desktop review of CSA
and WSC
Desktop review of current science, indigenous and traditional knowledge, and
best practice in relation to CSA and WSC in the South African context
1 June 2017
COMPLETE
2
Report on stakeholder
engagement and case study
development and site
identification
Identifying and engaging with projects and stakeholders implementing CSA
and WSC processesand capturing case studies applicable to prioritized
bioclimatic regions
Identification of pilot research sites
1 September
2017
COMPLETE
3
Decision support system for
CSA in smallholder farming
developed (Report)
Decision support system for prioritization of best bet CSA options in a
particular locality; initial database and models. Review existing models, in
conjunction with stakeholder discussions for initial criteria
15 January
2018
COMPLETE
FINANCIAL YEAR: 2018/2019
4
CoPs
and demonstration
sites
established
(report)
Establish communities of practice (
CoP)s including stakeholders and
smallholder farmers in each bioclimatic region. With each
CoP, identify and
select demonstration sites in each bioclimatic region and pilot chosen
collaborative strategies for introduction of a range of CSA and SWC strategies
in homestead farming systems (gardens and fields)
1 May 2018
COMPLETE
COMMUNITIESOFPRACTICE;COMMUNITYLEVEL
Province
Site/Area
;
villages
Demonstration
sites
Collaborative
strategies
KZN
Tabamhlophe
-
1st CC workshop
-
Collaborative strategies:
-2
nd CC workshop
-
Tunnels and drip kits
-
Individual experimentation with basket of
options
Ezibomvini/
Thamela,
Eqeleni
-
1st CC workshop
-Collaborative strategies
-2
nd CC workshop
-
Tunnels (Quantitative measurements
-
CA farmer experimentation (Quantitative
measurements)
case studies
-Individual experimentation with basket of
options
Limpopo
Mametja (Sedawa,
Turkey,
-
1st CC workshop
-
3rd DICLAD workshop
-
Collaborative strategies:
-
Tunnels (Quantitative measurements
-
CA farmer experimentation (Quantitative
measurements)
case studies
-
Individual experimentation with basket of
options
Tzaneen (Sekororo
-
Lourene)
-
1st CC workshop
-
Collaborative strategies
-Tunnels and drip kits
EC
Alice
(Middeldrift)
-
1st CC workshop
-2
nd CC workshop
-Individual experimentation with basket of
options
COMMUNITIESOFPRACTICE;STAKEHOLDERLEVEL
Province
Site/Area
; villages
Demonstration
sites
CoPs
Collaborative
strategies
KZN
Madzikane
(Creighton)
Stakeholder Forum
KwaNalu
, Landcare, KZN
DARD, LM,
GrainSA,
StratAct
, MDF, LimaRDF,
farmers
-Sharing and learning from different
programmes
-Collaborative strategies for support
organisations
-Joint learning events; CA, maize value
chain, agribusiness development
Limpopo
Hoedspruit
Agroecology network
AWARD, MDF and 15
collaborating and
interested organisations in
the field of CCA
-Sharing experiences for learning and
collaboration
-Exploration of best practise options in
community level climate change
adaptation
-Exploration of the role of agroecology in
these interventions
EC
Alice
Umvotho
Buboni Learning
Network
A4F, Fort Cox, ERLC
(Rhodes), MDF, farmers
groups
-Sharing and learning platform for
smallholder farmers to introduce new
ideas and concepts into farming
systems, discuss and explore options
and implement new ideas
Buildoncommunity-basedcriteria,indicatorsandpriorities
Generatetransitionalstrategies
Assess costsandbenefits
Linknationalandlocalplanningmechanisms
Strengthen localnetworks
Promotevaluesotherthanfinancialvalues
Prioritizelocallyappropriateactions
Encouragecropdiversityandcontinuity
Ensurehealthysoil
Protectnaturalresourcebaseandecosystemservices
Reduceexternalinputs
Makethemosteffectiveuseofwaterandlandforallpurposes
Enhanceunderstandingandskillsinstorage,valueadding,andmarketinggobeyond
immediatemarkets
DSSGUIDINGPRINCIPLES
FARMINGSYSTEMS
DSSOUTLINE:
STARTWITHDESKTOPINFORMATIONRECCINFORMATIONFORTHELOCALIT YANDGENERAL
FARMINGINFORMATION,THENGOONTOFOCUSGROUPDISCUSSIONSANDINDIVIDUALINTERVIEWS
Size
Resources: physical,
environmental
Resources: socio-
economic
Social/institutional
Management
capacity/technology
Farmer
Typology: A,B,C
Gardening
Field cropping
Livestock
Trees, incl fruit
Aspiration
Water management
Soil health
management
Crop management
Livestock
management
Natural resource
management
Farming
system
Water flow management
Infiltration
greywater management
RWH
Irrigation
Soil erosion control
Irrigation
increased organic matter
microclimate management
crop diversification
(including varieties,
calendars
improved tillage
agroforestry
fodder/feed management
..........
Practices
Labour
Cost
Ease- technical
Productivity
Soil health
Water use efficiency
Knowledge
Prioritization -
criteria
Focus group and
individual interviews,
walkabouts
Attendance
registers,
Focus group
discussions, individual
prioritization
Link to practices
flow chart
1 page descriptions-PP
WORKSHOPOUTLINE
1. Whatweareseeingaroundus,whathasbeenhappening(nature,
economy,society,village,livelihoods,farming)(listmainissues
(biophysical,social,economic)withrankingofvulnerability,
organisationalmapping,financialflowsandservicesmapping,
2. Past,present,futureoffarmingactivitiesandlivelihoods(timelines
andtrends)
3. Climatevsweather(roleplay)
4. Scientificunderstandingofclimatechange(Powerpointinput)
5. Seasonalitydiagramsoftemperatureandrainfallgenerallywhatit
is,whatischanging(seasonalitydiagrams)
6. Realitymaps(choosetemp,orrainfall):drawupmindmapsofimpacts
(mindmapping)
7. Turnimpactsintoprioritygoals(positivestatements)andthink
throughadaptivemeasuresthatweknowoforthinkcouldwork
8. Introducearangeofpractices(facilitationteam)relatedtothesegoals
tobroadenpotentialadaptivemeasures(A4picturesummariesand
powerpointpresentations)
9. Walkaboutsandindividualinterviews(transectwalks,keyinformant
interviews,mappingoflocalinnovations/adaptations)
10. Prioritizationofpracticesmatrixusingfarmerlevelcriteriafor
assessment(matrixrankingandscoring)
11. Planningoffarmerexperimentation,learningsessionsand
implementationofpractices(Individualexperimentationoutlines,lists)
FOCUSGROUPDISCUSSIONS:
CCDIALOGUESEFFECTS(PAST,PRESENT,FUTURE),SEASONALITY,
IMPACTS,PRACTICES,PRIORITIZATIONCRITERIASeasonality
diagrams;
rainfall, heat
Impacts;
reality map
CLIMATE
CHANGE
IMPACTSAS
DISCUSSEDBY
SMALLHOLDERS
Climate change impacts on livelihoods and farming
KZN
EC
Limpopo
Water
Less water in the landscape; streams and
springs dry up, borehole run dry, soils dry out
quickly after rain
Less water in the landscape; streams and
springs dry up, borehole run dry, soils dry out
quickly after rain
Less water in the landscape; streams and springs dry up,
borehole run dry, soils dry out quickly after rain
Dams dry up
Dams dry up
Dams dry up
Municipal water supply becoming more
unreliable
Municipal water supply becoming more
unreliable
Municipal water supply becoming more unreliable;
Need to buy water forhousehold use
now sometimes for
more than 6 months of theyear
RWH storage only enough for household use.
Soil
More erosion
More erosion
More erosion
Soils becoming more compacted and
infertile
Soils becoming more compacted and infertile
Soils becoming more compacted and infertile
Soils too hot to sustain plant growth
Cropping
Timing for planting has changed
- later
Timing for planting has changed
- later
Can no longer plant dryland maize
All cropping now requires irrigation
even cropssuch as
sweet potato
Drought tolerant crops such as sorghum and millet grow=
-
but severe bird damage
Heat damage to crops
Heat damage to crops
Heat damage to crops
Reduced germination andgrowth
Reduced germination andgrowth
Reduced germination andgrowth
Seeding of legumes becoming unreliable
Seeding of legumes becoming unreliable
Seeding of legumes becoming unreliable
Lower yields
Lower yields
Lower yields
Winter vegetables don’t do well
-stress induced bolting
and lack of growth
More pests and diseases
More pests and diseases
More pests and diseases
Loss of indigenous seed stocks
Loss of indigenous seed stocks
Livestock
Less grazing; not enough to see cattle
through winter
Less grazing; not enough to see cattle
through winter
Less grazing; not enough to see cattle through winter
More disease in cattle and heat stress
symptoms
More disease in cattle and heat stress
symptoms
More disease in cattle and heat stress symptoms
Fewer calves
Fewer calves
Fewer calves
More deaths
More deaths
More deaths
CLIMATE
CHANGE
IMPACTSAS
DISCUSSEDBY
SMALLHOLDERS
CONTINUED.
Natural resources
Fewer trees; too much cutting for
firewood
Fewer trees; too much cutting for firewood
Fewer trees; too much cutting for firewood
Decrease in wild animals and indigenous
plants
Decrease in wild animals and indigenous
plants
Decrease in wild animals and indigenous plants
Increased crop damage from wild
animals such as birds and monkeys
Increased crop damage from wild animals
such as birds and monkeys
Increased crop damage from wild animals such
as birds and monkeys
Availability of indigenous vegetables has
decreased
No longer able to harvest any resources due to
scarcity
Increased population puts pressure on resources
Social
More diseases
More diseases
More diseases
Increased poverty and hunger
Increased poverty and hunger
Increased poverty and hunger
Increased crime and reduced job
opportunities
Increased crime and reduced job
opportunities
Increased crime and reduced job opportunities
Increased food prices
Increased conflict
Inability to survive
It feels as if the end
of the world is
coming
We are being punished
by God for not living
correctly
Climate change is a reality and
we will need to find different
ways to do thing to survive
FOCUSGROUPDISCUSSIONS:
SOMECOMMENTSBYFARMERS
We are seeing the importance of protecting our natural
resources so that we can continue to live and grow crops in the
future
All the strategies we talked about here are not enough to solve
all the problems, but will improve our situation and the impact
will be reduced.
The issue begins with climate then leads to social problems.
We need to keep on trying different solutions
Inall7villagesfarmershadsomeideas,ormany,ofpotentialpracticesforCCA
POTENTIALADAPTIVEMEASURES:
Area
Village
Natl resources/
landscape
Water (manage and
increase available
water)
Soil health and fertility
(incl
Manage soil
movement)
Crops
Livestock
Other
Bergville
Thamela
RWH
Mulching
Savings groups
No previous exposure to improved
practices
Manure and fertilizer
bulk buying
Bergville
Ezibomvini
Spring protection
Compost
Natural P&D control
Plant fodder
CA learning groups; 3
-4yrs (MDF)
RWH storage tanks; Jo-
Jo tanks
Furrows
Tunnels
Infield rainwater
harvesting
Contours
Mulching
Dripkits
Diversion ditches
Greywater; tower
gardens
Line levels
Infiltration pits/ banana
circles
Stone bunds
Small dams
Suggestions
for Natural
resource
management
lag behind for
most groups
Practices
Criteria
: Scale: 1-bad 2-meduim 3-very good
Increase
water
availability
Increase
water
storage/
access
Increase
soil
fertility
Costs
Increase
crop
quality
Labour
Time
Total
Rank
RWH jojo
tanks
3
3
1
2
2
1
2
14
RWH
underground
tanks
3
3
1
1
3
1
1
13
Tunnel
2
2
3
1
3
1
1
13
Diversion
furrows
3
2
1
2
3
2
2
15
Mulching
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
19
1
CA/No
till
3
2
3
3
3
2
2
18
2
Furrows/ridg
es
2
2
2
3
3
2
2
16
4
Tower
garden
2
3
3
3
3
2
2
18
2
Key hole
garden
2
3
3
3
2
2
2
17
3
EXAMPLE1:
TABAMHLOPHE KZN(DEC2017)CRITERIAPARTICIPANTSDECIDEDUPONFOR
ASSESSMENT/PRIORITISATIONOFCSAPRACTICES
EXAMPLE2:
OAKS,LEPELLE,FINALELIMPOPOCRITERIAUSEDTO
ASSESSIMPACTOFIMPLEMENTATIONOFDIFFERENTPRACTICES
Oaks, Finale, Lepelle: Impact ofCSA practices
SCALE: 1=low; 2 = medium, 3=high (agreement betweenparticipants)
CRITERIA
PRACTICES
Easy
to do
More
food
Better
growth
Good
water
man
Better
soil
fertility
Score
Rank
COMMENTS
Trench beds
1
3
3
3
3
13
5
Very good for growth, soil health and
water management. The best
practice
-but difficult to dig
Mulching
3
3
3
3
3
15
2
Less irrigation providing more food
Furrows
2
2
3
3
3
13
4
more moisture, better growth,
carries some fertilityin the water
Rock bunds
2
3
3
3
3
14
3
deep irrigation, catches more fertile
soil
Adding
organic
matter to
thesoil
3
3
3
3
3
15
1
easier than trench beds
Crop
varieties
1
1
1
1
1
5
7
we do not have the knowledge
-but
will be easy once we know
Planting
times
2
1
1
1
1
6
6
would be nice to have a calendar to
remember.
Date
Area
Village
GPS
Surname
First
name
Cell no
ID number
Gender
Household
head (Y/N)
Education
Members of Social
organisation/s (describe)
e.g. savings group, learning
group…)
No of Adults in hh
No of children
Income sources (grants,
employment, remittances,
other
specify)
Level of
income
(monthly
hh)
Type of grant (s)
-
add in no
Child Support Old Age Foster care
Scale of operation
0,1
-1ha
1
-2 ha
>2ha
Farming activities
Garden (size)
Fields (size)
Livestock
(No)
Cattle
Goats
Chickens
Other:
Nat resources
-
specify
Trees
Indigenous plants
Resources and infrastructure
Water (list
-
tick and
describe)
-tap
-
standpipe
-
RWH
-
Other
HH
infrastructure
-
dwellings
-
electricity
-
fencing
-other
Farming
infrastruct
ure and
tools (list
Other
Other livelihood activities
(list)
Market access
(describe)
Training and advice
(Name sources of support)
INDIVIDUALINTERVIEWS
ANDWALKABOUTS
Ezimbovini(KZN)
walkabout; Jan 2018
shows heat and moisture
stress in sweet potatoes,
garden crops such as
cabbages and CA
intercropping trial with
maize and beans
INDIVIDUALINTERVIEWS;CCABASELINEIndicators
forvulnerability
This sub-group of rural dwellers are more
organised and committed and better
resourced for production and adaptation
than the average rural person
6interviews/province(Limpopo,KZN,EC)pilot
OUTCOMES
Averageage49yearsmostwithhighschoollevel
education
Higherdependencyratiothannationalave
Avehouseholdincome-R3992/month
Accesstoservices-89%electricity,water~50%only
Accesstofencingandagriculturaltools89%
80%belongtosocialorganisationssuchaslearning
groupsVSLAs,gardeninggroupsandco-ops
67%ofparticipantshavehouseholdgardensonlyand
55%ofparticipantsalsohaveaccesstolargefields
(0,1-.2ha).61%ofparticipantskeeplivestock.Only
16%owncattle
16%ofhouseholdshavedirectaccesstotraction(
animalandmechanical)
Average monthly income per household
Male headed (39%)
R7 071
Female and male headed
(33%)
R 2 068
Female headed (28%)
R 940
Household gardens are most common
(67%), followed by dryland cropping (38%),
and cattle ownership (16%)
FARMERTYPOLOGY
TYPOLOGY A: (2,5million); Female, farm for food
only, very low incomes mostly unemployed,
access to small plots, no hh level accessto water,
lower education levels and no access to formal
markets
Belong to VSLAs, engage in other livelihood
activities
TYPOLOGY C: (10 000) Male, farm mainly for
income, much higher incomes from employment
in hh, good access to water, higher education
levels and access to formal markets.
Belong to cooperatives or farm individually
FARMER TYPOLOGY
A (44%), (72%)
B (18%), (23%)
C (39%), (5%)
Basic socio
-
economic
and household
information
Gender
100% Female
farmers
80% Female farmers
5
-15% female
farmers
Age range
33
-66yrs
27
-48yrs
31
-78yrs
Household head
Female
Female/male
Male
Dependency ratio
0,7
1
0,5
Livelihood activities
Employment
Unemployed
Unemployed/
employed
Employed
Small businesses
80%(Selling in
schools, sewing etc)
0%
0%
Grants
1
-3
1
-3
1
-3
Farming activities
Gardens, fields,
livestock
Gardens, fields,
livestock
Fields, livestock
0,1
-1ha
100%
100%
1
-2ha
50%
>2ha
50%
Levels of income (per
hh/month)
R0
-R1999
R940
R2000
- R4999
R2 100
>R5000
R7 000
Access toservices
and infrastructure
Electricity
80%
80%
100%
Water
-taps (hh)
0%
50%
100%
Standpipes (100
-
400m)
80%
RWH
30%
67%
67%
Farming
infrastructure
Hand tools
Hand tools
Tractors, planters
Social organisation
Groups (for learning,
school gardening etc)
80%
80%
80%
Saving clubs
100%
60%
Cooperatives
100%
Learning and access
toinformation
Level of education
Grade 4
-Grade 12
Grade 7
-grade 12
Grade 11
- Diploma
Market access
Informal
15%
15%
67%
Formal
0%
0%
83%
Farming income
Food only
100%
40%
Food plus income
60%
Mainly income
100%
TYPOLOGY B: (250 000) Male and female, farm
for food and sell surplus, slightly higher incomes,
some access to hh level water, somewhat higher
education levels and no access to formal markets
Belong to VSLAs
CCWORKSHOP2
Prioritizationofpractices
PlanningforexperimentationwithCSApractices
LearningandmentoringsessionsinCSApractices
Collaborativeactivities
Individualexperimentation
COLLABORATIVEACTIVITIES:SHADECLOTHTUNNELS
16tunnels,with3smalldripkitseach(8inKNZ,8in
Limpopo)
Experimentation:trenchbeds,mixedcroppingand
mulchinginsideandoutsidethetunnel
Qualitativeand
quantitativemonitoring
(3ind/province)
INDIVIDUALEXPERIMENTATION:CONSERVATION
AGRICULTURE
3Quantitative
measurementplotsinKZN
andLimpoporespectively
Manymorefarmerlevel
trialsqualitative
measurementinKZN
linkedtoGrainSA
Soilfertility,soilhealth
waterbalanceindicators
KZNGoodgrowthand
results
Limpopocompletecrop
failure
Workinprogress:
34practicessofar
Alsosomegeneralsupportingpracticessuchascontours,line
levels,visualsoilassessmentsetc
Examplesbelow
CSAPRACTICES-1PAGERS
Bucket Drip kits
- Gardens
-<0,1ha,
-Medium cost, medium skills, including learning
and mentoring
-Medium maintenance drippers need to be
checked and cleaned regularly ; medium labour
intensive to set up, maintenance easy.
DESCRIPTION
-Stones and sand are placed in a bucket
(20L) for filtration of greywater to be used
in dripping system
-The drip kit is assembled on site making
your own string drippers and choosing
width of lines and spacing of drippers.
-2 lines 30cm apart and 5 m long is good for
a trench bed and provides 4mm of
irrigation.
-Watering is done on a daily basis
A 210l drum drip irrigation system used in a
tunnel
A well functioning string dripper that makes a
wetted circle around the dripper
Mulching the beds adds to efficient water
management A bucket drip kit irrigating a 1mx 3m trench
bed with mixed crops
Attaching the dripper lines to the feeder pipe
from the bucket
Making the string drippers
Bucket with stones;a cloth bad of
sand is added on top tocomplete
the filter
Stone bunds
-Gardens, fields
-<0,1ha, 0,1-1ha, >2ha
-Low cost, local resources,
-Labour intensive
DESCRIPTION
-Pack stone lines on contours to control water
movement
- The stones are keyed into a shallow ditch and
larger stones are packed downslope from the
smaller stones to avoid stone lines form
breaking and allow slow movement of water
though the stone lines
-Planting can be done below the stone line as
more water accumulates there, or just above
the stone line in the accumulated silt and soil
-Rainfall:>150mm/year
-Temperature: >5°C
-Topography: 0,5%-5%
-Soil: all types where stones and
rocks are easily available
A view showing the stones keyed into a ditch with
larger stones downslope of the smaller stones.
Bananas planted below a substantial stone
line
Brinjals planted in accumulated silt above a
garden level stone line
Small stone lines are used to control
run-off form a road and channel water
into the gardens
Stone lines are constructedon contour and can be done at any
scale.
Conservation Agriculture
-Gardens, fields
-<0,1ha, 0,1-1ha, >2ha
-Medium cost (Seed, fertilizer, agrochemicals), planters,
local resources
-Labour intensive
DESCRIPTION
-Minimal soil disturbance- no ploughing
-Soil cover through stover, mulches and
cropping cycles
-Diversification; intercropping, relay cropping,
cover crops ( legume- brassicas and grain
mixtures)
-Rainfall: >350mm/year
-Temperature: >5°C
-Topography: 1,5&-15%
-Soil: all types
Different planters;
Haraka (Wheel),
Matracca(jab) and
animal drawn
planters, (Knapik-
insert)
A small mixed plot peanuts, pumpkins
and maizeWinter cover crops; saia/black oats, forage
sorghum and fodder radish
Summer cover crops; sunflower, millet and
sunn hemp
A maize and bean intercropped plot-using
tramlines (double rows) and close spacing
Planting furrows and basins by hand using hand hoes
and MBLI planters without ploughing
WORKPLAN2018-2019
FINANCIAL YEAR: 2018/2019
CoPs
and demonstration
sites
established
(report)
Establish communities of practice (CoP)s including stakeholders and
smallholder farmers in each bioclimatic region.5. With each CoP, identify
and select demonstration sites in each bioclimatic region and pilot chosen
collaborative strategies for introduction of a range of CSA and WSC
strategies in homestead farming systems (gardens and fields)
1 May 2018
COMPLETE
Interim report: Refined
decision support system for
CSA in smallholder farming
(report)
Refinement of criteria and practices, introduction of new ideas and
innovations, updating of decision support system
1 October 2018
Interim
report: Results
of
pilots,
season 1
Pilot chosen collaborative strategies for introduction of a range of CSA and
WSC strategies, working with the CoPs in each site and the decisions
support system. Create knowledge mediation productions, manuals,
handouts and other resources necessary for learning and implementation.
31 January 2019
FINANCIAL YEAR 2019/2020
Report: Appropriate
quantitative measurement
procedures for verification of
the visual indicators.
Set up farmer and researcher level experimentation
1 May 2019
WORKPLAN2018-2019;CONTINUED
Theme
Activities
Practices
Inclusion of more practices in the 1pagers
Initial web design and online survey for the DSS
Exploration of potential practices(more expertise and refinement required); spring protection, furrow
irrigation, fodder production, crop calendars, seed saving, drought and bird resistant varieties
Process
Ongoing facilitation (learning, mentoring and monitoring) process to be conducted with the 7 established
learning groups across three provinces
Strengthening of stakeholder CoPs. Set up of learning and sharing events
Monitoring and
Evaluation
Participatory video for analysis of farmer perceptions, learning and implementation
Write up of first season monitoring results 9Quantitative and qualitative); summer (CA and winter
(gardening)
First assessment of appropriate visual indicators
Publications:
Adaptationnetworknewsletter;2articlesCASFIP
andCSAimpact
Crossvisits:
DARDandMDF:Lesothocrossvisit_CA
GrainSAFDPandARC-SGI_CAandimplementation
methodology
USAID,Ukuvuna_CommunitybasedCCA
Attendance:
Rangelandmanagement_UCPP_Matatiele
RegenerativeAgriculture_GrainSA_Reitz
Presentations:
CAlearninggroupsandfarmercentrespresentation
UbuhlebezweLMAgriculturaltaskteam,DRDLR
(KZN),UmgungundlovuDM,GrainSAfarmersdays(x5)
MadzikaneStakeholderForum, AgroecologyNetwork,
UnmovthoBuboniLearningNetwork,
PUBLICATIONS
AND
NETWORKING
Finalisationoftheses
SaneliseTafa:AgricEconomicMasters-UniversityofFortHare;July2017.Farmlevelcost-benefitanalysisof
conservationagricultureformaizesmallholderfarmersinOkhahlambaMunicipalityinKwa-ZuluNatalProvince,
SouthAfrica.
Paper:FarmLevelCost-BenefitAnalysis:TheevaluationofeconomicsofconservationagricultureinBergvilleTown
inKwa-ZuluNatalProvinceofSouthAfrica(Invitationtopresent:CentreforIntegratedAgriculturalSystems(CIAS)
attheUniversityofWisconsin-“TheAgroecologyofDevelopment:CommunitySolutionsinPost-ApartheidSouth
Africa”eventonNovember9th,2017)
KhethiweMthethwa:BAgricHonoursUniveristyofKwaZuluNatal.November2017.Investigatingthe
sustainabilityofadoptionofconservationagriculturebysmall-scalefarmersinBergville
Progresswiththeses:Finalproposalsandresearchmethodology
PalesaMotaung:MAgric-UniversityofPretoria.Evaluatingtherestorativeeffectofconservationagricultureon
thedegradedsoilsoftheupperDrakensburgareaofBergville,KwaZulu-Natalusingqualitativeversus
quantitativesoilhealthindicators
MazwiDlamini:MPhil-UWC_PLAAS.Factorsinfluencingtheadoptionandnon-adoptionofConservation
Agricultureinsmallholderfarmingsystems,andtheimplicationsoftheseforlivelihoodsandfoodsecurityin
Bergville,Kwazulu-Natal
Progress:Initialproposalsandresearchmethodology
KhethiweMthethwa:MAgricUniversityofKwaZuluNatal;January2018.ThecontributionofClimateSmart
Agriculture(CSA)practicesinadaptingtoclimatechange:ThecaseofsmallholderfarmersinKwaZuluNatal.
CAPACITYBUILDING