Phase 2 Milestone 2 Progress Report 1

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RESILIM-O:
| 1
RESILIM-O:
Resilience in the Limpopo Basin
Program Olifants
MILESTONE 2: Progress Report No 1
Under the
Lower Olifants catchment
Agricultural Support Initiative
(AgriSI)
07/07/2018
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Acknowledgements
The USAID: RESILIM-O project is funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development under
USAID/Southern Africa RESILIENCE IN THE LIMPOPO BASIN PROGRAM (RESILIM). The RESILIM-O project is
implemented by the Association for Water and Rural Development (AWARD), in collaborationwith partners.
Cooperative Agreement nr AID-674-A-13-00008.
© Association for Water and Rural Development (AWARD)
P O Box 1919
Hoedspruit 1380
Limpopo, South Africa
T 015-793 0503
W award.org.za
Company Reg. No. 98/03011/08
Non-profit org. Reg. No. 006 821
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ABOUT USAID: RESILIM
USAID’s Resilience in the Limpopo River Basin (RESILIM) program addresses ongoing degradation in the
Limpopo River Basin in southern Africa, where people face water shortages, increased floods, and declines
in crop productivity as climate change further stresses an already water limited region.
There are two components to the program; one operating at a basin-scale (RESILIM-B, which isimplemented
by USA-based Chemonicsand addresses similar issues at thescale of the four SADC member states thatshare
the Limpopo Basin (South Africa, Botswana, Zimbabwe and Mozambique) and a catchment-scale project
(RESILIM-O)that It is being implemented by the Association for Water and Rural Development (AWARD).
Both projects share the same overall objectives. You can find out more information on the RESILIM projects
on www.usaid.gov website and www.award.org.za.
The USAID’s RESILIM-O focusses on the Olifants catchment. The program aims to reduce the vulnerability of
people and ecosystems inthe Olifants Catchment specifically, by improving how transboundary natural
resources are managed. By understanding the systemic causes of vulnerability, including climate
vulnerability, it is promoting new ways of thinking and acting to promote integrated water and biodiversity
management.
ABOUT AWARD
At AWARD, we recognize that the natural world’s resources are limited, and undergoing rapid depletion and
transformation. We know current practices of useand management are inadequate to deal with the changes
and challenges we are facing. We design practical interventions to address the vulnerability of people and
ecosystems, and merge considerations from both environmentaland social perspectives.Our approach
involves thinking across disciplines, boundaries and systems.
We are working with diverse people and institutions in the water and biodiversity sectors in the Olifants
River Catchment to understand the multiple vulnerabilities tochange, including climate change. Along with
quality scientific contributions, our engagement in the socio-political context of the Olifants River
Catchment allows us begin to begin to institutionalize integrated, resilience-based practices, providing a
foundation for robust development policy and practice in the in this river catchment, and beyond
1
.
The Olifants Catchment: An overview
The Olifants River Catchment falls within the Limpopo River Basin, which is part of an international drainage
basin that stretches across South Africa, Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Botswana. In fact, the Olifants River
contributes nearly 40% of the water thatflows in the Limpopo Rivermaking it an important catchment in
the system as a whole
2
.
1
AWARD: Annual Report.2016/2017 Financial Year. RESILIENCE IN THE LIMPOPO OLIFANTS.10/31/2017
2
As above
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AWARD, 2017.
At the heart of this catchment is the Olifants River, a vital artery that flows for 560 kilometres through
South Africa and into Mozambique, where it is known as the Rio dos Elefantes in Mozambique.
This mighty river originates in South Africa’sMpumalanga Highveld, flowing northwards before curving in an
easterly direction through the Kruger National Park and into Mozambique, finally finding rest in the salty
water of the Indian Ocean near Xai Xai, just north of Maputo.
The main tributaries of the Olifants River are the Wilge, Elands, Ga-Selati, Klein Olifants, Steelpoort, Blyde,
Klaserie and Timbavati Rivers.
Along with its tributaries, it isone of the six major Lowveld river systems, occupying an area just short of
55 000 square kilometres. It traverses three provinces in South Africa; Gauteng, Mpumalanga and Limpopo.
About 3.5 million people live on the South African side of the catchment. In Mozambique, it flows through
Gaza Province, which is home to about 700 000 people.
A system under change
Our catchment is the foundation of our livelihoods and development. Yet the river and associated natural
resources in the Olifants Catchment are under threat.
Unchecked pollution, inappropriate land resource use, weak and poorly enforced policies and regulations
and poor protection of habitats and biodiversity are degrading the Olifants at an alarming rate. What’s more,
the area is however under threat from factors such as mining for heavy metals, inappropriate land
management, rural sprawland unsustainable useof natural resources. This affects the levelof goods and
services provided by the ecosystem.
The diverse population groups living in the Olifants Catchment all have one thing in common; they rely on
the river and the catchment’s natural biodiversity for their livelihoods. This reliance can be direct or indirect.
Rural communities rely on it for things such as traditional medicine,grazing and browse, fuel, food and
housing materials. Somepeople in river-side communities harvest reeds, collect water from the river for
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washing and drinking and use it for recreational and spiritual practices. Subsistence farmers in Mozambique
rely heavily on the catchment’s flood plains. There are also large mines and associated industries, large
scale agriculture and the wildlife economy, which all rely on ahealthy, functioning river system. Often
people forget that what they do upstream affects people down stream, sometimes with dire consequences.
The catchment isour home and it is worth investing in its future. The work reported here is part of the
ongoing activities of the RESILIM- O project under the grant from USAID: Southern Africa.
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Project partners
Mahlatini Development Foundation (MDF) isa small public benefit non-profit organization consisting of rural
development practitioners who specialize in participatory learning and action processes, sustainable natural
resource management and low external input farmingsystems, including a focus on rain water harvesting,
conservation agriculture, intensive homestead food production, food security,climate change adaptation
micro finance and enterprise development.
MDF designs and implements rural development programmes and training processes providing learning
processes for adults all the way from semi- literate farmers topost graduate university level. We work in
partnership with government and non-government organisations alike. We are sensitive to and mainstream
where possible gender, disability and people living with HIV/AIDs
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Contents
Table of Contents
1 Executive Summary.........................................................................................................9
1.1 Progress for the reporting period...................................................................................9
2 Project Objectives.....................................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
2.1 Overview of RESILIM-O Project objectives....................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
2.2 Sub-grant Project Objectives...................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
3 Theory of Change.......................................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
4 Milestone Description ..................................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
4.1 Definition of milestone and purpose...........................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
5 Project management plan............................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
5.1 Summary of project implementation process................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
6 Monitoring, evaluation, learning and reporting (MERL) plan...................Error! Bookmark not defined.
6.1 Draft framework & indicators...................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
6.1.1 Baseline .........................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
6.1.2 Ongoing monitoring ............................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
6.1.3 Evaluation .......................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
7 Media and communications strategy................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
8 Sub-grant protocols and procedures ................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
9 Approach/ Process/ Activities.......................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
9.1 Summary of activities............................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
9.2 Progress and Results ..............................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
9.2.1 Learning and mentoring ......................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
9.2.2 Innovations and Experimentation ...........................Error! Bookmark not defined.
9.2.3 Work Plan for 2018. ...........................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
10 Appendices.............................................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
10.1 Appendix 1: Gannt Chart AgriSi 2018-2019..................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
10.2 Appendix 2:.......................................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
13.3 Appendix 3: Homestead assessment monitoring sheet (baseline)......Error! Bookmark not defined.
13.4 Appendix 4: Garden monitoring and individual experimentation plan. Error! Bookmark not defined.
13.5 Appendix 5: Attendance registers for CA demonstration workshops: December 2017- Turkey,
Mametje and Botshabelo. ............................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
13.6 Appendix 6: Establishment of CA trial or experimental sites............Error! Bookmark not defined.
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13.6.1 Trial size and layouts ........................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
13.6.2. Progress of Koko Maphori’s trial plots....................Error! Bookmark not defined.
13.6.3 Monitoring of CA trials .......................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
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1Executive Summary
1.1Progress for the reporting period
Continuation from reporting for Inception period of Phase II (Milestone 1):
Baseline for the new learning group in Sedawa-extension (Turkey)
Training workshops for 4 villages (Lepelle, Sedawa, Botshabelo, Turkey); in soil fertility
management, tunnel and drip kit constructions, cropping calendars and seed saving
Initiation of a relationship with Hoedspruit Hub: Local marketing of herbs and vegetables
Participatory Video training
Initiation of 2 local water committees and local action in water provision and management
Garden monitoring; Sedawa, Turkey.
During this period Betty Maimela, a local intern has been brought on board and Nozipho Zwane has
finalised her internship and leftMDF.
IMPLEMENTATION TEAM
MAHLATHINI: Erna Kruger, Sylvester Selala, Betty Maimela (intern)
AWARD: Cryton Zazu, Bigboy Mkhabela,
2Project Objectives
2.1Overview of RESILIM-O Project objectives
RESILIM-O is large multi-faceted, multi-stakeholder, cross-boundary programme to reduce vulnerability to
climate change through building improved transboundary water and biodiversity governance and
management of the Olifants Basin through the adoption of science-based strategies that enhance the
resilience of its people and ecosystems through systemic and social learning approaches. The programme
has been running for four years and is being implemented by AWARD (The Association for Water and Rural
Development) with funding from USAID.
The Agricultural Support Initiative (AgriSI) was initiated as a sub-grant process within the larger
programmed towards the end of 2016. This initiative works specifically with climate change adaptation
processes with smallholder communities in the lower Olifants River basin. It is being implemented jointly
by Mahlathini Development Foundation and AWARD.
The Agricultural Support Initiative (AgriSI) addresses two of the RESILIM-O programme objectives directly:
i.To institutionalize systemic, collaborative planning and action for resilience of ecosystems and
associated livelihoods through enhancing the capacity of stakeholders to sustainably manage natural
resources of the Olifants River Basin under different scenarios
ii.To reduce vulnerability to climate change and other factors by supporting collective action, informed
adaptation strategies and practices and tenable institutional arrangements.
2.2Sub-grant Project Objectives
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Sound agro-ecological practices for soil and water conservation (SWC) and the ability to self-organise and
act collectively are regarded as fundamental for building adaptive capacity and resilience to climate
change. Not only do agro-ecological farming approaches require minimum external inputs which may be
expensive and increase dependency if subsidised but they foster farmers’ sense that they can build
sustainable futures from local inputs and efforts. With knowledge about the potential impacts of climate
change included in the learning journey, farmers can make purposeful decisions around practices such as
seed and crop-type. This approach supports livelihood diversification also fundamental for increased
resilience through ‘value-added’ associated activities such as seedling production, tree nurseries and
bee-keeping.
The overall aim of the Agricultural Support Initiative is to enhance the resilience of the people and
ecosystems in selected villages (6-7) in the Lower Olifants River basin, using a systemic social learning
approach, exploring the question:What are you learning about the socio-economic and biophysical
characteristics of your environment and how these are changing and how are you able to respond to that?
The overarching objective of this work is to provide support for increased adaptive capacity and resilience
to the effects of climate change for households involved in agriculture in select communities of the
Olifants River Catchment through:
- Improved soil and water conservation and agro-ecological practices for increased food security
- Livelihood diversification and supplementation through alternative climate resistant production;
- Increased community empowerment as a result of self-organisation and collective action.
-
3Milestone Description
3.1Definition of milestone and purpose
Each milestone and progress report indicate activities under the broad themes of learning and mentoring,
introduction to innovations and experimentation, collaborative work and networking undertaken during
the reporting period.
The table below summarises these activities against the milestone and indicate achievement of these
milestones.
Table 1: Summary of deliverable completion under Milestone 1: 2 May 7 July 2018
Activities
planned
Completed?
Expected
outcomes
Completed?
Verification
documenta
tion
Completed?
Reference
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Learning &
Mentoring:
-Baseline new
learning group in
Turkey, Decision
support and
planning
-Learning
sessions; review
of S&WC and
CSA, for all
groups (1 day).
-LF training;
qualitative
quantitative
monitoring
C
-Baseline report for
Turkey
-Learning groups;
learning sessions
overview of practices
incl cropping
calendars, soil fertility
management, tunnels
and seed saving
-LF’s undertake garden
mentoring and
monitoring with
farmers (3-4 days
each), supported by
field team
C
C
C
Progress report on
outcomes
including the
following
documentation:
1. Photos & photo
diaries
2. Farmer work
plans
3. Garden
monitoring
4. Monthly
assessments
5. Cluster activity
records
6. Event
materials,
attendance
registers
C
1. Photos in
reports and All
photos saved in
directories and
kept by Erna
2.Farmer work
plans are
recorded in the
garden monitoring
forms
3. 44 Garden
monitoring forms
across six villages
4. In this report
5.Appended to
this report
6.Appended to
this report
-Individual
farmer
experimentation
- prioritized,
garden
monitoring.
Mentoring by
trainers and LFs’
C
- Garden monitoring
including trainers and
LFs- all participants
visited at least once by
LFs and a garden
monitoring form
completed
C
C
Networking;
Participatory
video
C
Participatory video
training for field staff
and local facilitators in
Lepelle and Sedawa
Initial theme of water
provision explored for
community level action
C
C
C
4Approach/ Process/ Activities
4.1Summary of activities
This section gives an indication of activities undertaken during the reporting period to achieve the
outcomes for this period, time spent and people involved.
Table 2: Summary of activities for the reporting period 2 May-7 July 2018.
DATE
DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITY
Time
WHO WAS
INVOLVED
Feb- March
2018
Tunnels and drip kits- construction Turkey,
Sekororo, Sedawa (8 tunnels). Bed Design Workshop;
Turkey, translation of handouts, report writing,
setting up E-survey on Pendragon, setting up
27 days
Sylvester
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Chameleon sensors (3 x 3 arrays) and VIA workshops,
gravimetric soil sample analysis
2018/03/12-16
DICLAD w/s 3 and write up of 3 workshops
6 days
Nozipho
2018/04/16
Agroecology workshop
1 day
Erna, Sylvester
2018/04/17
Intern interviews
3 days, 1 day
Erna, Sylvester
2018/04/18,19
Learning workshops Lepelle, Turkey water, seed
saving
2 days
Erna, Sylvester
2018/04/20-22
Monitoring, travel, reports
3 days
Erna, Sylvester
2018/05/03-/05
Preparation, Pendragon forms, travel
3 days
Sylvester
2018/05/08-
10,12
Planning, Turkey baseline homestead visits (20
participants)
4 days
Sylvester, Betty,
Nozipho
2018/05/11
Learning Workshop Cropping calendars and Seed
Saving; Sedawa
1 day
Sylvester, Nozipho,
Betty
2018/05/15
Baselines and garden monitoring forms Turkey
1 day
Betty, Sylvester
2018/05/16
Baselines and garden monitoring forms turkey
1 day
Betty, Sylvester
2018/05/17
Trip to Hinesburg (potatoes seed) + Baselines +
leadership workshop by Hoedspruit hub
1 day
Betty, Sylvester
2018/05/18
introducing Betty to communities and measurement
instruments
1 day
Betty, Sylvester
2018/05/19
Seasonal calendar +Seed saving workshop
(Botshabelo)
1 day
Betty, Sylvester
2018/05/21-31
Write up of baselines and monitoring
10 days
Betty, Nozipho
2018/06/04-08
Garden monitoring Sedawa, report writing,
Pendragon continuation,
5 days
Betty
2018/06/11-15
Captruing data, checking chameleons and tunnels in
Sedawa and Mabins
5 days
Betty
2018/06/18-22
PV training, Focus group discussion on water issues
Lepelle, Sedawa, water walks and plans
5 days
Erna, Betty, Sylvester,
Big Boy, Chris Stimie,
Neville Meyer
2018/06/25-29
Continuation with monitoring, case studies and
success story videoing Sedawa, Botshabelo, and re-
setting of instrumentation chameleons, weather
stations. Report writing and finalisation
5 days
Betty, Sylvester, Erna
2018/07/04-07
Milestone 2 writing and finalisation of reports
4 days
Erna
Sylvester:59 days, Erna:20days, Nozipho: 21 days, Betty: 40 days
4.2Progress and Results
4.2.1Learning and mentoring
Learning processes conducted are summarised in the table below
Table 3: Summary of learning sessions conducted: April-July 2018
Village
Date
Activity
No of
participants
Comments
Turkey,
(Sekororo)
2017/11/29,30
Climate Change
workshops (2 days)
74
CC impacts and local
adaptive measures
Turkey,
Sedawa
2017/12/06;
2018/12/07
CA workshop
38,22
Demonstration of CA, and
animal drawn planter, seed
distribution for
experimentation (Maize,
beans, cowpeas
Turkey,
Sedawa
2018/01/10,
2018/01/11
CA replanting
42,21
Replanting, incl cover crops
(millet, sunflower, Sunn
hemp, maize, beans)
Turkey
2018/03/05
Soil fertility training
(trenches, eco-circles,
31
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mixed cropping,
mulching)
Turkey
2018/03/08
Liquid manure and
natural pest and disease
control
49
Turkey,
(Sekororo)
2018/04/12,13
Tunnel construction (2
days); including drip kits,
re-cap on trench bed
packing and experiment-
planting inside and
outside tunnel
47
1 tunnel constructed, with
help from Sedawa
participants and 3 more done
by participants themselves
thereafter
Lepelle,
Turkey,
Sedawa,
Botshabelo
2018/04/18,
2018/04/19,
2018/05/10
2018/05/13
Planting calendars, seed
saving and seedling
production
16,48,26,6
Seed provided include
coriander, parsley, carrots,
rape, broccoli, beetroot,
spring onions and mustard
spinach. (small packets to all
participants)
Lepelle,
Sedawa
2018/06/19,21
2018/06/20,22
Water issues focus
groups, Part video,
collective action plans
27,6
20,6
Water committees have laid
out plans for water provision
to the groups, a water walk
has been conducted to the
respective sources and a
broad plan to be designed
for further action
Learning workshops are conducted as group discussions, starting with local practices and analysing the
potential benefits of the new ideas. Participants discuss their local practices, then compare those with
the new ideas introduced to assess potential strengths and weaknesses of the approach.
These are followed by practical demonstrations and an assessment by the learning group related to the
activity. The table below includes some of the comments made by participants.
Table 4: Comments from participants on new practices introduced in learning workshops
Practise/Activity
Comments by participants
Visuals
Trench beds
It is a lot of work (it takes someone
with the love for gardening to get the
courage to make a trench bed)
Even though the work is too much
during design or construction of the
trench bed, it looks like once it is
made one will have less work
It saves cost (we used the material
that was sourced locally at no cost)
even though some people pay so much
for manure in the areas
Contributes to cost saving on labour
(less weeding)
Easy to maintain
Could potentially improve crop quality
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Tower gardens
It is easier to make a tower garden
than it is to make a trench bed
The ability of a tower garden to
accommodate for planting a wide
variety of crops, is good for food
security
Increased plant population or
production per unit area
Less bending and easy to weed
We have improved the soil fertility in
this bed therefore, one would expect
to get high yields
Continuous production at low or cost
Might contribute significantly to water
savings (use of grey water with the
tower garden will make efficient use
of the limited water in the
homesteads)
Eco circle
It is very easy to make
Uses readily available meterial
Less digging
No cost
Can only accommodate a small
nuumber of plants
One can make a number of these
small beds easily
Liquid manure
Intersting
Initially thought we could use this
instead of other soil fertility methods
Could to be able to boost plant grwoth
during the season
Natural pest
control
Never heard of this before
Can help us deal with the increased
pests linked to the increases in
temperature
There is more damage due to pests in
the fields (Maize, pumpkins, cowpeas)
than in the vegetable gardens
The brews are easy to make, but it
seems approrpaite for gardens only.
Not sure this can be done for large
fields
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Good innovations that can be done at
low cost
Mixed cropping
Traditionally this was done in fields
In gardens having the same crops
together looks presentable and helps
with harvesting awa having enough
to sell
Companion planting sounds quite
complicated
We did not know that this can help
with pest control
Drip kits
It saves water (this became clear after
the system was tested)
It irrigates very well
Consistency (the soil is more likely to
always be at field capacity even
spread of water across the bed)
It is cheap, even though some still
think it is too expensive for them
The participants were very impressed
with the bucket filter and were happy
that they can now use grey water in
their gardens.
Tunnels
Participants are fascinated by the
thinking that went into designing a
drip kit and a tunnel. They have
always seen such structures as
something that was out of their reach
(something that could only be done be
large commercial farmers).
Participants inquired about the size of
the shade cloth (nets) and whether
sizes were standard from the shop-in
thinking about constructing more
tunnels for themselves
There process is easier than we
thought (If we are to build another
tunnel as a group we should be able to
remind each other of what we learnt
and should be able to complete the
construction)
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Seasonal
calendars and
seed saving
-Farmers are realizing that more
accurate / appropriate seasonal
calendars specific for their area will
have to be developed locally (and by
them)
-In some way the idea of using a
calendar is relatively new and foreign
to them (therefore making a habit to
use them is not going to be that easy)
-They are already making adjustments
to their planting dates and they are
also learning from these experiences
-In some way, they are running
experiments which are however not
documented (instilling the idea of
famer led experimentation could help
to monitor such changes closely)
-Farmers found the workshop to the
useful and the information shared was
just what they needed
-Use of the seasonal rainfall prediction
information (Weather Bureau) could
be useful in helping them making
decisions regarding planting dates
(especially for rainfed farming)
-Participants feel that they have
gained enough knowledge to allow
them to start saving vegetable seed
-Some are even thinking of saving seed
for selling, even though seed is not
one of the things they are used to
selling. They normally share it at no
cost.
Participants found the seed
selection procedure introduced in
the workshop very interesting and
as something they were not aware
of. They enjoyed an exercise where
they had toidentify the male and
female parts of a flower on
different flower types. This
process helped themrealize the
reason for butternuts and pumpkins
not forming in their gardens they
did not know cucurbits have male
and female flowers and thesehave
to be pollinated by bees.
4.2.2Innovations and Experimentation
Garden monitoring has continued in this quarter. Summaries have again been made of local innovations
and introduced innovations being practiced by
participants. The garden monitoring for Turkey
included 20 learning group members (results are
presented in the case study below) and garden
monitoring has also been conducted for a further 19
participants from Sedawa and Mabins.
The more and more desperate situation with water
has led to learning group members coming together
and collective action in water provision.
ALTERNATIVE SOURCES (Percentage of
households with access)
Jo-Jo tanks at household level
12 %
Buying 210l drums of water
80%
Springs (Nov-June)
8%
Wells (Nov-Dec)
36%
Municipal water (ave 1x /
week)
56%
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In Sedawa a water committee has been formed (informal) consisting mainly of members of the learning
group and those associated with them and have collectively raised around R 8000 for piping to bring water
from a spring in the mountains above the village. In Lepelle the Water committee has been formed to
renovate and maintain the existing water supply furrow, which was made in the 1920’s by members of the
community.
In both cases the groups have gained permission from their traditional authorities.
To support these processes AgriSI have run Focus group discussions with them to outline and clarify their
ideas and plans and also in bringing in an agricultural engineer to give them a technical assessment of
their suggested plans.
In addition this process has been linked to the participatory video training for staff, local facilitators and
community members as a way to create and amplify a voice for these people in their communities and
with relevant stakeholders and also as a way of documenting this success alongside their climate smart
Agriculture( CSA) success stories. Full reports are attached with this document.
Below is a visual summary of the processes.
Next steps include
Learning to edit videos and making a rough edit of the focus group discussions and presentations
Screening of this cut with the learning groups and water committees to further refine and edit the
clips
Decision with the learning group where to screen and or send this video for best effect. This can
include government and non government organisations, the broader community and the
municipality. Assist in arranging these meetings and screening sessions
Once the technical briefs are received form the engineer, meet to discuss the next steps in the
process, including exploring funding options for these initiatives.
FACILITATION OUTLINE FOR WATER FOCUS GROUP DISCUSSIONS
For local initiatives, municipal water supply and local sources e.g. rivers, and spring explore the
following:
1. Define the sources, what they are, where, how they are manged, who has access
2. What is working (enablers)
3. Challenges/barriers the communities are facing with the systems
4. Who are the role players, what are their responsibilities (got, civil society and local structures)
5. Community led action, ideas and the way forward.
6. What do you think participatory video (PV) can do to assist with awareness raising and lobbying
After the focus group discussion, divide the group into three smaller groups to focus onwater (summary
of main points from the discussion), map (the plan) and timeline. Then presentations,which will be
documented/filmed with the key statements 3/4 people.
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The focus group discussion on the water situation and the collective action planned by the learning group was
videoed as part of the participatory video learning process. A summary of the history of water provision in
the community was presented along with a time line and a map of the planned water provision strategy. This
was followed by a water walk where a group of participants and the facilitation team went to inspect the
source and discuss options
Sedawa
Lepelle
MILESTONE 2: PROGRESS REPORT NO 1
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4.2.3Networking
Two processes are underway:
1.Agroecology network
2.Hoedspruit Hub partnership
The first Agroecology networking process was attended on 16 April 2018 in Hoedspruit. Various
networking opportunities have arisen from this interaction, including the present collaboration with the
Hoedspruit Hub
4.2.3.1Partnership between the Hoedspruit Hub and Mahlathini for customised agroecology
training
A MoU has been signed between the Hub and Mahlathini for two processes in agro-ecology, namely a
marketing process for organic herbs (with 20 participants mainly from Sedawa and Botshabelo) and an
organic Mango production training course (for commercialisation of mango production in Lepelle, for 30
participants). Both processes will contribute to the diversifications of livelihoods for the participating
smallholder farmers. The first activity here has been to conduct a baseline survey to ascertain needs and
next steps. Below is a report of that process.
4.2.3.1.1Mahlathini site visit report (By: Nelson Ngoveni & Anri Manderson-22 June 2018)
In June 2018, Mahlathini and the Hoedspruit Hub signed an MOU to co-create customised agroecology
training for two groups supported by Mahlathini: Herb growers to access markets through the Hub; and
mango growers with skills to better and expand their production.
As part of the Hoedspruit Hub process, Nelson conducted site visits for a baseline study on the 19th and
20th of June 2018. These site visits included two workshops, which were held in Lepelle village and the
other at Sedawa village. This is a short report on the Hub’s findings.
Herb growers
On the 19th the day started with a few stops at the various gardens of the herb growers. It was evident
that these ladies had water challenges, but were really trying and committed to growing herbs and
veggies. After the few stops we drove to the workshop, which was held at one of the cluster leaders and
herb grower’s home. The leader had a very impressive garden with many types of vegetables and herbs.
MILESTONE 2: PROGRESS REPORT NO 1
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Above: Essinah Malepe’s trench beds planted with herbs and vegetables. Magdalena Malepe’s planting of spring
onions and coriander and vegetable planting in her tunnel. Christinah Thobejane’s trench beds planted to mixtures of
herbs and vegetables.
In addition, to kick start a more intensive process of growing herbs
Mahlathini has provided herb seedlings for sale to the participating
farmers (coriander, parsley, basil and thyme), given that progress with
planting from seed has been a little slow.
Right; Participant members buying their herb seedlings. The process is being
organised by the Local Facilitator- Christinah Thobejane
Questionnaires were completed with some of the participants and from
a summary of outcomes, the following can be said:
The herb growers are mostly female
The women are experienced vegetable growers, and new to
growing herbs
Most of the surplus vegetables is sold to the community
The farmers are keen to produce more surplus for market,
including herbs
They don’t keep records, thus making it difficult to determine amount of previous harvest
The garden layout and planting makes very difficult to determine quantities
The produce(all) is washed with borehole water
There is currently no solution to transporting produce halfway towards the Hub
Based on these few findings, HH suggestions include the following:
Conduct a one-day workshop with the herb growers to explain how the process would work,
co-developing a logistics solution to get herbs from their gardens into Hoedspruit.
Also include modules on garden layout and mapping, basic planning, planting schedules, and
record keeping. This will assist the Hoedspruit Hub to determine how much herbs they have, and
how much they plan to harvest, to organise collection periods more efficiently.
Timing: Early July 2018. The workshop was held on 9 July and record of the process is to be
included in the next Milestone report.
Mango growers
On the 20th we drove to Lepelle village where a workshop was scheduled with the community. From
coming into the village one could tell that almost every household had a couple of old mango trees. As the
workshop proceeded Nelson was
given a slot to introduce himself and
explain his reasons for the visit.
During the workshop he had another
chance to complete the
questionnaires with the various
mango growers.
Right: George Sebatane’s mango orchard,
where he has included basins and
improved furrows for irrigation
management of his trees.
After capturing the data from the
questionnaires, the following can be highlighted as key findings:
Almost everyone had a couple of mango trees around their homes
MILESTONE 2: PROGRESS REPORT NO 1
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Most of the mango trees have been in their families for a very long time, some even date back to
the 1970s. Some of these trees are still productive.
Apart from watering, the trees are not actively managed to improve yields
The trees are attacked by pests
The community has lots of water, but water is managed poorly
Most of the mangos they produce is sold in bulk to achar producers and or street vendors
Most of the participants have land and water to expand
Based on these few findings, HH’s suggestion include the following:
South Africa currently has no organic mango producers, which opens up the market for interested
candidates. The Bryanston Natural and Organic Market has indicated that they would take all
available organic mangoes from these producers, on condition that their practices are PGS-
endorsed.
We thus suggest a five-day workshop on how to improve current yields on the trees, using organic
methods. It’s important to note that this may take another cycle, as trees are already starting to
flower, which ultimately determines yields.
There may be some things to do now that could slightly improve yields, but ultimately the trees
would need to go through an entire well-managed cycle, and potentially even a few to reach
ultimate production.
The training will thus include the following: Organic practices for optimising mango yield, ideal tree
varieties for expansion, grafting, and an introduction to PGS and its’ required record keeping.
The diversity of ages within the group requires a programme that caters for people with low levels of
literacy.
Timing: Early August 2018.
4.2.4Other Activities
DICLAD module 3 with AgriSI stakeholders and participants in the Lower Olifants was carried out as a one
day workshop for the 7 villages involved (Botshabelo, Sedawa, Willows, Lepelle, Oaks, Turkey and Finale).
Attendance was as follows:
- Sedawa, Willows, Turkey; 33 participants
- Botshabelo;14 participants
- The Oaks, Willows and Finale; 15 participants
The overall purpose of these workshops wasto build climate change literacy among stakeholders and
participants with regards to climate change adaptation options related to small scale agriculture. As a
continuation of this aim, two themes were addressed for this purpose: 1) recapping work that was done in
previous workshops to reinforce learning; and 2) improving risk management and planning (namely, how to
make decisions in a dynamic context).
The ’Five Finger” principle was revisited alongside the impacts of climate change and potential adaptive
measures participants suggested as well as those they have tried or are trying already.
Then a number of different aspects were explored including; traditional signs of weather traditional
forecasting methods and what they use weather/climate information for. Then seasonal and daily weather
forecasts were explored looking also at sources of information (e.g. TV, cell phones, internet, radioetc)
and how that information is used. Participants also discussed their understanding of the reliability of these
forecasts.
Participants also discussed seasonal calendars and drew up cropping calendars for their villages. Below is a
combined seasonal calendar for the Lower Olifants- including information from all the workshops.
MILESTONE 2: PROGRESS REPORT NO 1
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Figure 1: Combined seasonal calendar for 7 villages in the Lower Olifants Basin.
A full report is attached (DICLAD Module 3 with AgriSI stakeholders in the Lower Olifants
14th 16th March 2018
Report)
4.3Success and Challenges in meeting milestone.
Lack of water is the primary concern in a number ofvillages and until headway is madewith water provision
for productive activities, it is unlikely that much progress will be made. Lepelle and Sedawa in particular
return to this topic repeatedly. Thus a process has been put in place with formation of water committees,
to manage the planning and implementation of local water actions in these villages. This process also is
central in the participatory video initiative as it is hoped these small videos will alert the local authorities
to the communities’ plight and initiate more constructive engagement.
Learning groups in Willows and The Oaks are mostly inactive. A slow process of garden monitoring with the
new intern is hoped to assist in understanding the issues to plan specific interventions in these areas.
In Finale, the learning group members are once again engaged in daylabour activities on the nearby fruit
estates. The meetings have now been moved to weekends to accommodate for this; although from last year
our experience has been that participantsdo not apply themselves to their gardening activities once their
seasonal farm works starts up.
Betty Maimela has been introduced to all communities and is takingtaxis to the villages todo her support
and monitoring work. She needs to give a concerted effort to practicing her driving skills before another
arrangement will be possible.
4.4MERL.
4.4.1Indicators: Assessment July 2018
Figures in the table reflect numbers for the period of reporting, in this case May-July 2018.
JanuaryFebruary March April MayJuneJulyAugustSeptemberOctober November
December
Mango Fruits
vegetables
Indigenousknowledge signs
rainfall
winter
summer
droughts
fliesAutumn
millipede Spring
StarsBirds
Autumn
Spring
SEASONAL CALENDER FOR LOWER OLIFANTS VILLAGES
Rainfall
Onion
Droughts
Rainfall
Winter
Summer
watermelonand melon
Green beans
Sugarcane
Banana
Maize
Butternut
Carrots
Cabbage
Tomatoes
Spinach
Dry beans
Cattle mate
Summer
morogo
sorghum
pumkin
watermelon
Groundnuts
Sweet potatoes
Beetroot
MILESTONE 2: PROGRESS REPORT NO 1
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A combined team meeting to review this assessment sheet was conducted on 18 June for this reporting
period and numbers have further been summarised from field reports and discussions with the field team.
Table 5: Summary of indicators assessments for the duration of the AgriSi project:April-July2018
Indicator
Overall target
Actual July 2018
No of participants in learning groups
120
98
DICLAD w/s 3 (63); Lepelle
(16), water. Turkey (48)
soil fertility, tunnels.
Botshabelo (6), Sedawa
(28), Turkey (48)
calendars and seed saving.
Lepelle (20) Sedawa (27) -
water focus groups
No of learning groups
6-7
6
No of local facilitators
6
4
Percentage of participants engaged in CC adaptation
responses
1-2 (45%)
2-3 (25%)
>3 (10-15%)
1-2 (67%)
2-3 (16%)
>3 (1%)
No of participants experimenting with new
innovations
-local
-co-designed
15%
45%
5%
43%
No of participants showing increased knowledge
35%
-
Percentage of participants engaged in collaborative
activities
35%
44%
Percentage of participants with improved livelihoods
-increased availability of food
-increased income
-increased diversity of activities and livelihoods
options
40%
5%
5%
38%
-
-
Qualitative assessments;
-stakeholder engagement
-Increased understanding and agency to act towards
achieving increased resilience
- Adaptation and innovations into local context
-Potential for increased resilience
-Social engagement
Stories, case
studies (5), CC
impact summaries
(4), best practices
booklet
Turkey (1)
Stakeholder engagement
MoU with Hoedspruit Hub for sale of herbs and
veg from 2 learning groups
Agro-ecology network
COMMENTS ON INDICATORS IN THE TABLE ABOVE
The indicators have been jointly compiled with the MERL team also to reflect and provide information for
the overall indicators for the ResilmO programme. Some are process indicators that can be assessed
continuously, some are assessed through the garden monitoring and yet others are more evaluative and
are assessed during review sessions and workshops.
The number of Local Facilitators have been reduced, as some of the village learning groups are
not very active and LF’s there have not been active themselves
The percentage of participants engaged in CC responses changes over time and is somewhat
different for each milestone, as it depends on the practices introduced and worked with in that
period and how active the participants involved are. For example, the uptake in villages such as
Turkey is higher than villages such as Lepelle. These different percentages are then averaged over
the period of the project to create a final percentage at the end.
In terms of local innovations, this has to do again with what is focussed on during the period of the
milestone and who was visited. The point of tracking local innovations is to understand how much
participants innovate in a certain field themselves and how we can enhance the impact of such
MILESTONE 2: PROGRESS REPORT NO 1
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practices by appropriate interventions. In this case an example could be small dams that are dug
in the yards- this is a local practice, implemented only by a small number of farmers; but is
significant and interesting for the process as a whole
Number of participants showing increased knowledge is an indicator that is assessed primarily
through review workshops and processes with the learning groups. This was thus not done during
the period of the present milestone.
4.4.2Turkey case study
4.4.2.1Implementation of new ideas in Turkey
The learning process is designed to start with the gardening practises known to participants and to build
on those and add new ideas and practices that participants can try out.
Learning activities in Turkey to date include: Climate change and adaptation, Conservation Agriculture
Soil fertility and bed design, grey water management (tower garden and drip kits), tunnel construction,
farmer experimentation, liquid manure, natural pest control, cropping calendars and seed saving
The table below gives an indication of which new ideas/innovations participants have been trying out in
Turkey after the learning sessions were conducted. 90% of participants have tried out at least one of the
new ideas introduced.
Table 6: Summary of new ides/interventions being tried out in Turkey: Jan-May 2018
From the above table and figure it can be seen that around 85% of participants are implementing the
trench beds, 65% have planted legumes, 55% have tried out the eco-circles and smaller number of
participants have followed through with the seedling production, diversified cropping, mixed cropping,
0 2 4 6 810 12 14 16 18
Cut off drains
Diversion ditches
Stone bunds
trench beds (ave 3)
eco-circles(1-2)
Diversified crops
Seed and seedlings
mulching
Contours, line levels
Liquid manure
Green manures, legumes
inter cropping
Nat P&D control
CA
Bucket filters
tower gardens
keyhole beds
Tunnel
RWH storage
Cut
off
drains
Diversi
on
ditche
s
Stone
bunds
trench
beds
(ave
3)
eco-
circles
(1-2)
Diversi
fied
crops
Seed
and
seedli
ngs
mulchi
ng
Conto
urs,
line
levels
Liquid
manur
e
Green
manur
es,
legum
es
inter
croppi
ng
Nat
P&D
contro
l
CA Bucket
filters
tower
garden
s
keyhol
e beds
Tunnel
RWH
storag
e
Series1 020 17 116 5 1 1 713 7 0 2 1 1 0 1 0
New interventions and innovations adoption Turkey - May 2018 (N=18)
MILESTONE 2: PROGRESS REPORT NO 1
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liquid manure and mulching. Some of the soil and water conservation practices such as contours, diversion
ditches and the like still need to be introduced. The number of participants who mentioned implementing
the Conservation Agriculture is small, due to the complete crop failure for these experiments, which were
abandoned mid-season. Also, thus far only a few tunnels with drip kits have been constructed- more as
pilots and demonstration sites, for the learning group to get an idea of how these work, prior to more
extensive implementation.
The garden monitoring process tracks both the local good practices and new innovations/ideas
implemented by participants. The idea is that each garden is monitored at least once a season to
ascertain progress overtime. In addition, an assessment is made of food security for the household
(showing no of different crops/ vegetables harvested on a weekly basis and how often the family can have
food form their garden.
The monitoring is undertaken jointly between the local facilitators for the area and the new local intern
that has been employed for this purpose. An e-survey format has recently been set up, so that these
monitoring processes can be done on tablets and the data uploaded for easier access and formatting into a
coherent database.
MILESTONE 2: PROGRESS REPORT NO 1
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Below are some photographs showing implementation in Turkey
Figure 6: A small dam dug in Ms Mogale’s yard- it holds water for
around 3 months/year
Figure 1: Magdeline Shai-Turkey 2 eco-circle with
mixed cropping including green beans, and spinach
Figure 2: Magedline Shai- seedling production
including newly received seeds of rape, mustard
spinach and beetroot
Figure 3: Shade netting structure put
up by Mafogo Maapule Turkey 1
Figure 4: Further small netting
structures for individual beds in
Mafogo’s garden
Figure 5: 3 trench mulched trench beds, one planted to
mustard spinach Magalangake Mgaale Turkey 1
MILESTONE 2: PROGRESS REPORT NO 1
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Figure 8: Spinach planted in a container and protected from heat and
browsing by netting. In Mabiletse’s yard.
Figure 7: 4 trench beds prepared by Mabiletse Mogofe- Turkey 1
Figure 11: Left: Hand dug well in Sarah Madire-
Madire’s homestead (turkey 2) and (Right) 3 of the 5
trench beds she has constructed.
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Figure 9:Dinah Masete’s 2 eco-circles planted to spinach, mustard spinach, rape and tomatoes and
mulched. (Turkey 1)
Figure 10: Sarah Mohlale’s tunnel and outside trenches- for her experiment, 3 drip kits and (Right) her mixed
cropping eco-circle (Turkey1)
Figure 13: Mothouane’s 2 eco-
circles (Turkey 1). Rest of garden
not that well developed
Figure 22: Tower garden for Nkurwane Shaai,
Turkey 2
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Figure 15: Interesting garden layout of furrows
and ridges that are on contour and includes
basins for rainwater harvesting Mtshego Shaai’s
garden, Turkey 2
4.4.2.2Farmer Experimentation
An integral part of the learning process is for participants to take on farmer level experimentation with
the new ideas and technologies introduced. They try out these new ideas alongside their normal practices,
to be able to observe and compare any differences in growth and production as a result of implementing
the new or improved practices.
The percentages of participants who are implementing a certain technique such as trench beds for
example differs form the percentage of participants actively “experimenting” with trench beds. For the
latter the participant consciously undertakes an experiment, with a control and observes and measures
the differences between their normal practice as the control and the new technique they are
experimenting with. In this way they can make informed decisions around the impact of the technique.
The figure below indicates the individuals who have taken on experiments and what they are trying out in
the Turkey Learning group to date (January-May 2018). Around 43% of participants are experimenting with
Figure 14: Left-Lydia and Phelicia Shaai’s garden in Turkey 2. They have focused on herb planting and
mixed cropping; incl lemon balm, rosemary, coriander, and spring onions. Right an eco circle with
mulching and mixed cropping
MILESTONE 2: PROGRESS REPORT NO 1
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trench beds, 24% with eco-circles, 16% with mixed cropping, and 3% respectively with furrows and
mulching. Around 11% of participants are not implementing farmer experiments.
Figure 3: farmer Experimentation; numbers of participants experimenting with a range of new ideas/innovations.
Turkey, May 2018
4.4.3Project Life Change Questions:
1.Do we have examples or stories of how we or others are in the process of adaptive management
related to CC? (adapt, reflect and respond to….) and examples of what this adaptive
management is?
Some of the stories shared at a workshop in Turkey relate to this question, for example:
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
43%
24%
16%
3% 3%
11%
Farmer experimentation with new ideas
Experimentation trench
Experimentation eco-circle
Experimentation mixed cropping
Experimentation mulching
Experimentation furrows
Experimentation None
Mr Shai is able to sell spinach worth R 100 a week
from the towergarden. He haspraised the tower
garden for its ability to save water and said the
soil fertility in the tower garden is very high. He
wants totry more of them and encourages others
to try it as well. Other members of the learning
group have passed by Mr Shai’s gardento see how
the spinach grows in a tower garden
MILESTONE 2: PROGRESS REPORT NO 1
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It is becoming clearer to participants that using the agroecological practices and or techniques introduced
work better if they are tried together. For example mulching on it’s own, without also looking at soil
fertility, water management and mixed cropping has limited benefits. They have also adapted mulching
processes by experimenting with different materials such as tree leaves and wood chips. Others have
found that mulching may attract termites and so have thought of using small pieces of shade netting to
protect their beds and eco-circles. The shade provided has a similar effect to mulch in terms of reducing
evaporation and decreasing temperature.
9.Do we have stories that show innovation or lack of innovation towards positive change? What
insights have we gained into how innovation can lead to positive change? (INCREASED RESILIENCE)
Isaac Malatje is impressed with how well trench beds are doing in Sedawa and he wants to try this on a
somewhat larger scale to see if he cannot use gardening as an income generating activity. Others are
following his lead, including Christina in Sedawa who is now making longer trench beds and this has
increased her production. During one the workshop held at her homestead she was able to sell spinach
worth R 230
10.
Above left to right: The large trench beds constructed by Isaac Malatjie in Turkey, which have been used now also by
Christina Thobetjane from Sedawa, having listened to his explanations. She has been selling spinach to the
community and is doing well with this activity
Mrs Mogadi was also amazed by the amount of
spinach she wasable to produce from a small eco-
circle (1 meter diameter). She mentioned that if
such easy to do techniques work, then tunnels
combined with drip kits will work even better. Mr
Malatji added toher story to say, these are the
simple things which we can all try.
MILESTONE 2: PROGRESS REPORT NO 1
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As facilitators we have noticed that certain innovations are taken up more easily than others. The initial
drivers here are short term benefits and ease of implementation and functionality. Some of the practices
are not that easy, such as trench beds for example and with these people have now seen others succeed
and have noted the benefits through word of mouth. This then creates a situation where people adopt
these practices themselves.
11.Do we have stories that show evidence of, or an interest in self organisation towards collective
action? What insights have we gained into how self organisation can lead to collective action?
In Turkey learning group participants mentioned that it is possible to invite other stakeholders (Landcare,
the Department of Agriculture and the municipality) to these meetings (it looks like your (MDF’s) process
is focusing more on educating us, but we might need support (financial) in implementing some of the
things you introduce/ what you might introduce in the future). They followed on by inviting the extension
officer to the learning workshops.
Two water committees have been set up (Lepelle and Sedawa) to organise participants to take action in
local water provision schemes. In both cases participants are collecting monies for the purposes (for
buying cement and piping) and have asked for technical assistance with the design of the system.
4.Do we have stories to show that learning together is happening or that there is an interest in
learning together? What insights have we gained about how to learn together?
People learn the most when they share their experiences with each other. Through the workshops, having
people from different places/villages helps with this. It has become more common for members of the
Sedawa group to join workshops in Turkey and vice versa. These forums are providing platforms for people
to share
5.Do we have stories of how we and or others are able to think systemically? What insights have we
gained?
Regarding water management we are now seeing farmers starting to integrate knowledge and play that to
their situations. Some individuals have designed their own catchment areas in their gardens for harvesting
rainwater working with some of the principles that were introduced in the learning workshops. They are
starting to appreciate that soil holds the most water or holds water like a reservoir and that promoting
infiltration and water holding improves this process. They are using different water sources and are
becoming more comfortable with use of greywater as they start to experience the possibilities of cleaning
this water for re-use.
6.Do we have stories of how we and or others are able to be inclusive and democratic? What insights
have we gained about how this can be achieved? (STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT).
Through the agroecology learning network set up earlier in the year a working relationship has been built
with the Hoedspruit Hub to collaborate in efforts around capacity building in the community and in starting
a small organic herb marketing scheme. In this way the community can be better supported through these
joint efforts, while the organisations focus on their core activities; complementing each other.
More and more government officials (agricultural extension officers), councillors and indunas are becoming
involved at the learning group level, asthey are joining in on workshops and participating in community led
actions for improvement. This process is working a lot better than the more formal invitations that were
provided to these stakeholders to join past workshops.
MILESTONE 2: PROGRESS REPORT NO 1
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4.4.4Work Plan for next period (7 July-10 October 2018).
1.Learning sessions; review of S&WC and CSA, for all groups (1 day), Seed saving and seed banks,
crop calendars training- continued for Finale, Oks and Willows. Start on Poultry production
training in Botshabelo, Turkey, Sedawa).
2.Group editing of the participatory videos in water management and success stories for initial
community level screenings and planning for interventions with service providers and other
stakeholders.
3.Individual farmer experimentation - prioritized, garden monitoring.
4.N initial group of 20 participants (Sedawa, Botshabelo) are planting their first round of herbs
(parsley coriander, basil, thyme to provide a test run for the organic herb marketing process in
conjunction with the Hoedspruit Hub. Thee farmers will be provided with ongoing support and
further planning sessions are to be held regarding supply, quality, pricing and logistics
5.Tunnel construction continued in Turkey, Sedawa, Finale
6.Cluster network session; Impacts of activities
7.Agroecology network- sessions on a CoP for best practices in CSA
8.Continuation of garden monitoring and support for Local Facilitators and learning groups (now
using the e-survey format)
9.Finalise and run fruit production training in conjunction with Hoedspruit Hub
10.Use of participatory video as a tool to build agency in the villages for CCA activities and
communicate successes and issues with relevant stakeholders
5Overall Progress of Project
5.1 Integration of milestone status.
The table below indicates overall completion of activities according to milestones.
Table 7: Milestone target completion May-July 2018
MILESTONE 2: PROGRESS REPORT NO 1
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5.2 Project risk and mitigation summary.
5.2.1Implementation risks and mitigation
Implementation is proceeding well at this stage, with no further risks identified. Risks that exist and are
being managed include:
Lack of water which hampers participants ability to do any gardening or farming. This has
reduced the number of active participants as the situation is slowly and markedly worsening.
There are some internal conflicts regarding traditional councils and chieftainship in the Mametje
area, where two chiefs are conflicting over who is in control in those villages (Sedawa,
Botshabelo, Mametje). This has caused some individuals to withdraw from the learning groups
MAHLATHINI
MILESTONE COMPLETION: Completion to date % (in black)
Key activities /
Milestones
MILES
TONE
1
MILESTONE
2
MILESTONE
3
MILESTONE
4
MILESTONE 5
MILESTONE
6
MILESTONE
7
Inception report
100% /
Setting the scene
50%
New villages,
baselines, visioning
scenarios
Turkey, CCA
workshops,
visioning
and baseline
New village,
CCA
workshops,
visioning and
baseline
Learning and
mentoring
25%
Learning sessions x 3-5
for ea learning group,
value adding activities,
mentoring LFs (24
sessions total)
Turkey (3
sessions)
Sedawa,
Botshabelo,
Lepelle (1
session)
Experimentation &
intro to innovations
20%
Individual
experimentation
New innovations seed
saving, fodder
production etc
2 villages
(Turkey,
Sedawa)
6 villages
6 villages
6 villages
6 villages
6 villages
Collaborative work
20%
Joint experimentation
on new ideas
Collective action
RWH, erosion control
activities
3 villages
(Turkey,
Sedawa,
Lepelle)
Networking and cross
visits
15%
Community level cross
visits
Stakeholder engagement
-Agroecology
network
-Hoedspruit
hub
MILESTONE 2: PROGRESS REPORT NO 1
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The demand for implementation of tunnels is much higher than the project can provide. A set of
criteria have been put in place to prioritise participants to receive support in this aspect. These
include women headed and poorer households
5.2.2Financial risks and mitigation
The project is on track and is being managed within the budget confines set out.