Milestone 5 Progress Report 4

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RESILIM-O:
Resilience intheLimpopo Basin
ProgramOlifants
MILESTONE 5: ProgressReport #4:
April- June2017
Under the
Lower Olifants catchment
Agricultural Support Initiative (AgriSI)
Implemented by
2
Table of Contents
Summary .............................................................................................................................. 4
2. Activity record for the period........................................................................................... 5
3. Progress ........................................................................................................................ 7
Milestone 5: April-June 2017: Progress according to deliverables.................................... 7
3.1Description of progress to date............................................................................... 8
4. Summary of baseline and implementation progress per village.................................... 13
5. Individual Experimentation........................................................................................... 14
6. Summary of milestone implementation across villages................................................ 16
7. Monthly team assessment........................................................................................... 17
Indicators: Assessment June 2017.................................................................................. 17
Project Life Change Questions:....................................................................................... 18
7. Work Plans for the coming three months...................................................................... 20
Attachment 1: Invitation to Farmers’ Open day for the AgriSI programme ....................... 21
Attachment 2: Programme for the Farmers’ Open day in Sedawa, 25 April 2017 ............ 22
Attachment 3: Programme for World Biodiversity Day workshop in Sedawa.................... 23
Attachment4: Programme for CC dialogues at community level..................................... 24
DICLAD Module 1 outline of dialogue topics.................................................................... 24
Activity: Systemic look at risks, vulnerability and potential adaptation actions Instruction
sheet for facilitators............................................................................................................. 28
Attachment 5: Agenda for Commuity based Visioining Exercise in Lepelle_1 June 201731
Attachment 6: Detailed upcoming milestone (Milestone 6) activity plans (July-September
2017) .................................................................................................................................. 32
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4
Summary
During this quarter water shortages have once more come to the fore as the most severe
constraint in production. In both the Oaks, and Sedawa the municipal water provision
systems failed completely; thus joining the Willows and Botshabelo in their plight.
Householders buy water at R30-R35/210l drum. Flourishing gardens have shrivelled to sand
and little winter vegetable planting has been undertaken.
Afurther visioning process was conducted in Lepelle, including also AWARD staff and the
INR team focussing on value adding and non-farm small business development under the
Resilim O programme. A strong focus of this process was the development of opportunities
for youth in the area.
Other networking and stakeholder interactions included a community event for World
Biodiversity Day(held at Sedawa community hall) and the AgriSI Open Day in Sedawa,
showcasing the climate smart agriculture practices and processes being implemented to the
broader community and role players, including theMunicipalities, officials from the
Department of Agriculture and participants from Lima RDF and Ukuvuna.The event included
participants from all 6 villages linked to this programme and introduced the newly elected
local facilitators.
This quarter has seen a focus on monitoring processes:
Garden monitoring was commenced using the newly designed form and local
facilitators were provided with training for their work and their monitoring
responsibilities. A total of 24 garden monitoring interviews have been conducted.
An open day was held in Sedawa, including all the learning groups and community
members, reviewing the learning to date as well as monitoring the implementation to
date through a communityreview (five fingers) process.
Learning and innovationworkshops and sessions continued apace. Learning in the groups
has continued and focused on soil fertility management, including liquid manures with some
input also on natural pest and disease control options.A range of multipurpose plants, trees
and herbs were introduced in these sessions for participants to plant in their gardens-
serving as windbreaks, pest repellent plants, medicinal plants, culinary plants, indigenous
fruit and shade plants. Learning workshops have now been held in Botshabelo (11),Sedawa
the Willows (9), Oaks and Finale (13).And Lepelle(33).
Ten learning group participants across Botshabelo, Sedawa and the Oaks have been
provided with the materials for construction of tunnels and drip kits. These participants
fulfilled the criteria of digging and packing 3x6m trenches for their tunnels. This was put
forward in group meetings and agreed to as a process for support. The participants are to
work as small subgroups in their villages constructing the tunnels by themselves, with some
initial support from the field team if still required.
Learning group participants volunteered for construction of underground RWH storage
structures in their years (24m3). The understanding is that the householders will provide
sand for construction and all labour required for construction of the tanks, to be eligible to
receive the materials. Further criteria were set at a village level, with assistance from local
facilitators and included need-both in terms of water shortages and finances (poor woman
headed households have been prioritised) and level of gardening activity. Each plot was
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assessed for technical viability and the required tank type (ferro cement or geofabric &
bitumen). With financial assistance from DKA, throughAWARD, 4 underground RWH
storage tanks have been sited, the holes dug and are in the process of construction.
PARTICIPANTSTHIS PERIOD
SEEDS OF LIGHT:Trygive Nxumalo
MAHLATHINI: Erna Kruger, Sylvester Selala, Chris Stimie
AWARD: Richard Hatfield, BigboyMkhabela,
This report contains the following annexures:
Attendance registers
1. Annexure 1 _Open day _ Joint community based review of learnings to date and Local
Facilitator training_Sedawa_20170425
2. Annexure 2_ Cluster activity record_Learning Workshop_ Soil fertility and natural pest
and disease control_Sedawa-20170419-20
3. Annexure 3_ Cluster activity record_Learning Workshop_Natural pest and disease
control_ Willows_20170430
4. Annexure 4_ Cluster activity record_Learning Workshop_Soil fertility and natural pest
and disease control_Botshabelo_20170530
5. Annexure 5_ Cluster activity record_ Learning Workshop_ Soil fertility and natural pest
and disease control_Finale_20170621
Annexure 5.1_Learning materials
6. Annexure 6monitoring forms_GARDEN MONITORING AND INDIVIDUAL
EXPERIMENTATION PLAN
7. Annexure 7_Local Facilitators Training Workshop_Sedawa_20170607-09 Annexure 7:
Learning materials_ Workshop pics_20170314
8. Annexure 8_Collaborative work_RWH storage tanks progressreport_July 2017
9. Annexure 9_Compilation of B2Os for the reporting period.
10. Annexure 10:Examples of garden monitoring forms filled in by local facilitators-end June
2017
2. Activity record for the period
This section gives an indication of activities undertakenduring the reporting period.to
achieve the outcomes for this period, time spent and people involved.
DATE
DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITY
WHO WAS
INVOLVED
2017/03/27-29
Writing up field reports and doing Milestone 4
documentation -3 days respectively
Erna, Sylvester
2017/04/12-13
Translation of garden monitoring form into
Pedi and liaison with Trygive for monitoring (1
day), Designing Open dayprogramme and
sending out invitations (1 day), Monitoring in
Mametja (2 days)
Sylvester,
Trygive, Christina
Thobejane
2017/04/12
Review of verifiables, rework of Milestone 4
report and documentation 6 hours
Erna
2017/04/17
Preparation for AWARD weeks and travel to
Tzaneen (12hours)
Sylvester
6
2017/04/18
Tzaneen; procurement of plants and trees
from various nurseries andtravel on to
Hoedspruit (8hours)
Sylvester
2017/04/19
P&D control training in Sedawa (8hours)
Sylvester, Trygive,
Christina
2017/04/20-21
Continuation with preparation for Open day,
monitoring in Oaks, Mametja, Botshabelo-
trench beds for tunnels (16hours)
Sylvester
2017/04/24-25
Preparation for and running open day in
Sedawa (20hours ea for E and S), (8 hours-
BB and Try
Erna, Sylvester,
Trygive, BB,
2017/04/26
P&D control training in Willows (10hrs)
Erna, Sylvester,
Trygive
2017/04/27-28
Household monitoring (16 hours ea), return
travel
Erna, Sylvester
2017/05/15-17
Write up garden monitoring forms (2 days)
Erna
2017/05/18,19,20
Bank details, year end financials DKA
proposal rework, ordering of more tunnels,
arrangement for tank construction, (3 days)
Erna
2017/05/21
Travel to Tzaneen
Sylvester
2017/05/22
Tzaneen; procurement of plants and trees
from various nurseries and travel on to
Hoedspruit (8hours)
Skype meeting; DICLAD and visioning, with
prep (2,5hrs)
Erna, Sylvester
2017/05/23-26
Training of LF’s and garden monitoring(3
days)
Sylvester, Trygive
2017/05/29
Planning of visioning, office admin(1 day)
Sylvester, Richard
2017/05/30
Garden monitoring, checking for RWH
storage tank sites(1 day)
Sylvester
2017/05/31
World biodiversity day; Sedawa Community
Hall(1 day)
Sylvester, Trygive, BB
2017/06/01
Lepelle visioning workshop(1day)
Sylvester, Trygive,
Richard, INR
2017/06/02
Botshabelo Soil fertility learning and
innovation workshop(1 day)
Sylvester
2017/06/06-08
Summarising homestead assessment
information in excel format (3 days)
Erna
2017/06/08-09
Field reports (2,5 days)
Sylvester
2017/06/10
Bookings and logistical arrangements-next
field visit (4hrs)
Erna
2017/06/13
Travel to Hoedspruit office admin (1 day)
Sylvester
2017/06/14-15
Garden monitoring, checking RWH sites for
preparation to build. Tunnel sites checking of
trench packing (3 days)
Sylvester
2017/06/17
Field reports (1,5days)
Sylvester
2017/06/18-21
Travel, deliver tunnel materials and get work
team going on tunnel construction x10. Do
underground RWH tanks construction training
for 2 sites (ferro cement and geofabric &
bitumen (5 days)
Erna, Sylvester, Chris
7
2017/06/22-23
Continuation with construction of tunnel in
Botshabelo and initiation of construction in
Mametje
Sylvester, Trygive,
Lenkie
2017/06/26-28
Milestone 5 report and documentation
Erna, Sylvester
Sylvester: 40 days, Erna: 27days
3. Progress
Milestone 5: April- June 2017: Progress according to deliverables
Below is the summary table of all activities and outcomes undertaken during this reporting
period.
Table 1:Summaryofdeliverable completionunderMilestone 5: April- June2017
Activities
planned
Completed?
Completed?
Verification
documentati
on
Completed?
Reference
Learning &
Mentoring:
In all 6
communitie
s each 2
days
Learning &
Mentoring:
Local
Facilitator
training
Local
Facilitator
mentoring of
new practices
Farmer
ongoing self-
monitoring, -
assessment
and learning
C
C
C
C
Progress report on
outcomes including
the following
documentation:
1. Photos & photo
diaries
2. Farmer work
plans
3. Garden
monitoring
4. Monthly
assessments
5. Monitoring forms
6. Cluster activity
records
7. Event materials,
attendance
registers
8. Vision and
scenarios record
C
1. Photos in reports
andAll photos
saved in directories
and kept by Erna
and Lenkie
2.Farmer work
plans are recorded
in the garden
monitoring forms
3.24 forms across
four villages
4. In this report
5. 24 garden
monitoring forms
6.Appended to this
report
7.Appended to this
report
8.Written up by
AWARD team.
Intro to
innovations
and
experimenta
tion: In all 6
communitie
s each 2
days
Mentoring by
trainers and
LFs’
C
C
C
Collaborativ
e work: In
all 6
Site
assessments
and
C
C
C
8
communitie
s each 2
days
community
contributions
to
infrastructure
support;
tunnels, drip
kits and RWH
storage tanks
Networking:
Villages 1 &
2
(Botchabelo
& Sedawe)
open day
(each 1 day)
Exchange
visit 1 to
Sekhukhune
(35 farmers)
Local
Facilitators
networking:
with
Sekhukhune
Open day for
implementatio
n review
No activity
planned-
under
milestone 5
C
N
C
C
C
3.1Description of progress to date
NETWORKING
An open day was held in Sedawa for participants from all six villages to showcase
implementation and practices introduced for the 2016-2017 summer growing season.
See attachment 1 and 2 for the invitation and programme for the day.Stakeholders
(NGOs, Department of Agriculture, Local Municipal Officials) were also invited to the
workshop.
oAround 66 community participants attended. The workshop provided a
platform for review of practices,by farmer participants themselves and also
for learning and building understanding of different practices fit together to
build a more sustainable and resilient gardening system.
oLocal facilitators for all six villages were formally introduced to farmer
participants. These facilitators ran the thematic information ‘stations’ for the
day including soil and water conservation, intensive homestead vegetable
production, production in a shade house/tunnel, using drip kits and greywater,
multipurpose trees and shrubs and nursery management and conservation
agriculture.
oInstitutional stakeholders promised to come, but were conspicuous in their
absence.
oThree extension officers from the Venda office joined the workshop. They
were extremely enthusiastic and complimentary and wanted to set up a
working relationship and a cross visit to their area.
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oField staff and local facilitators from Lima RDF joined they were given the
opportunity to introduce the food security programme –“Arelemeng” that they
are implementing in the area. An agreement was made to synergise activities
and training across this programme and the AgriSI initiative.
A community workshop was run for World Biodiversityday in Sedawa. This was led
by the Department of Economic Development and Tourism. Stakeholders presented
their programmes and implementation approaches. Community members were given
an opportunity to discuss issues and suggestions. This workshop helped to raise the
awareness of theimportance of conserving biodiversity in the community and
additionally provided some ideas for projects and small business development
around biodiversity conservation and promotion.
Follow-ups were made with LimaRDF staff to ensure that thetwo gardening based
programmes implemented bythem and AgriSi do not cause trouble for each other.
A visioning exercise was held in Lepelle which included the AgriSi team as well as
the INR who are working with alternative livelihoods and micro-enterprise
development. The agenda for the visioning workshop is outlined in Attachment 5. The
aim was produce a broader community level vision and action plan for activities that
potentially include the AgriSi climate smart agricultural practices, but include also
broader aspects such as enterprise development and social and institutional change
options.
LEARNING AND MENTORING
Learning workshops were continued and soil fertility sessions and sessions on
natural pest and disease control have now been conducted for all six villages(See
Annexures 2-5). See Annexure 5.1 for learning materials used.
The process included an introduction into multipurpose plants, that included
indigenous trees and shrubs as well as herbs and medicinal plants. Plants that have
a significant roleto play in pest control were also introduced. Samples of plants were
procured from Tzaneen nurseries and also from Trygive Nuxamlo through his
nurserying work in his home area. Some examplesof trees supplied include Moringa,
Maruals, Dikgogomo and Umthungulu. The herbs include lemon balm, chives,
comfrey, lavender, rosemary, thyme, wild basil, mint, pennyroyal, coriander, parsley
and fennel.
Different planting arrangements were agreed to in the different villages by the
learning group participants. In some cases, the suggestion was made that the local
facilitators plant all the herbs as a demonstration; in other cases the plants were
distributed between participants.
Vegetable seed was also distributed in theseworkshops to provide for diversified
production in the participants’ winter gardens. Seed included; Chinese cabbage,
mustard spinach, kale, broccoli, cauliflower spring onions, celery, parsley, coriander,
leeks and spring onions.
INTRODUCTION TO INNOVATIONS AND EXPERIMENTATION
10
A training sessionwas held for all Local Facilitators to go through theirjob
descriptions, filling in of timesheets and also useof the garden monitoring forms.
See annexures 6for the monitoring forms and 6 for the LFtraining workshop report.
LF’s are expected to visit gardeners in their village on a monthly basis and to
complete at least one garden monitoring form for each of the learning group
participants. To this end the form was translatedinto isiPedi. Two days were spent in
the field working with sub groups of the LFsto ensure their ability to confidently work
with these forms and fill them in. The LFs were then asked to continue visiting
learning group participants and complete forms by themselves. On average 8-10
visits were conducted by the LFs during the month of May 2017. A sample of garden
monitoring forms filled in by local facilitators is shown in Annexure 10.
An arrangement will be put in place for the new intern for AgriSI to support the LFs in
garden monitoring. They are finding the filling in for the monitoring forms somewhat
onerous. They also need to plan for mini workshops where some of their participants
are still unclear on the implementation of some of the intensivehomestead food
production techniques introduced through the learning process.
Garden monitoring was conducted for a number of participants by the AgriSi
facilitation team as well, prior to handing over this responsibility to the LFs. These
have been compiled as
Some preparation was made for running the CC dialogues in the 6 villages in the
Lower Olifants. Discussions were held by the team and an outline or process was
jointly designed. See attachment 4. Unfortunately,the days chosen for running these
sessions in two of the communitiesoverlapped with an urgent processrelated to the
RWH underground storage structures and the workshops have beenpostponed for
July-August.
COLLABORATIVE WORK
A process was set up for individual participants who want to implement the
construction of tunnels/ shade houses in their homesteads. Volunteers are required
to dig three 6x1m trenches and pack these to be eligible for receiving the materials
for the tunnel. They are expected to construct the tunnels themselves, with some
assistance form the facilitation team. A list of volunteers was generated at the open
day and further additions were made by the Local Facilitators. Household visits were
conducted for those volunteers who had completed their trenches.
The team was surprised bythe large number of volunteers who made their trenches
around 18 in total spread across Sedawa, Mametje, Botshabelo and the Oaks. Due
to limited budget availability 10 volunteerswere prioritised for the initial supply of
tunnels. This was based on the following criteria, which had been discussed and
ratified by the Local Facilitators:
-Women headed households are to be prioritised
-Households who have little or no access to municipal water supply.
-Poor households
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-Active and enthusiastic gardeners
10 Tunnel kits have now been delivered and work parties have been put together to
construct the tunnels over the next month or two.The joint construction of one of the
tunnels in Botshabelo has been started.
Village
Name
Description
Botshabelo
Miriam Malepe
Trenches dug, partiallyfilled. Still collecting
manure and organic matter
Mosebu Ntlamo
Trenches dug-tins and green organic matter
collected. She still need to collect manure and
finalise packing of her trenches
Gogo Mogotho
Trenches dug, packed and ready for the tunnel
Mametje
Matibeng
Morema
Trenches finalised and planted. She has in
addition built a small fence around her gardening
plot.
Norah Mahlaku
Trenches finalised and planted, along with a
number of other trench beds and shallow
trenches in her garden
Dronah Marepe
Trenches finalised. Seedlings planted and ready
for transplanting into the tunnel
Sedawa
Magdalene
Molepe
Trenches finalised, planted and mulched, along
with a number of other trenches and beds in her
garden.
Norah Malepe
Trenches dug andpacked-ready for tunnel.
The Oaks
Betty Mokgobo
Trenches dug andpacked-ready for tunnel
Florence Lewele
Trenches dug andpacked-ready for tunnel
Right and far right Matibeng
Morema’s trenches at the
end of April-in process of
being dug by family
members and endJune-
packed and planted to
seedlings-ready for the
tunnel. In addition she
constructed a fence around
her small gardenwhich
she started after the AgriSi
learning workshops
12
Right: Norah Mahlaku’s
trenches planted to seed
and watered. She has also
started a garden since her
involvement in the learning
groups as has
Far Right: Magdalene
Marepe.Here she planted
and mulched her trench
beds for the tunnel. She
has a beautiful garden
alongside these trenches.
In addition,the support from DKA for piloting the construction of 4 undergroundRWH
storage tanks was finalised. 4 Volunteers were chosen on the basis of a number of
carefully chosen criteria, they were visited and siting for their tanks and water inflow
and outflow paths was done. They started on the digging of their holes. These have
now been inspected and some of the materials required for construction have been
delivered to the volunteers. They are Miriam Malepe and Gogo Nthlamo in
Botshabelo and Norah Malepe and Christina Thobejane in Sedawa.See Annexure 8
for a report on implementation progress.
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4. Summary of baseline and implementation progress per village
This table provides an overview and summary of all activities undertaken on a village by village level. It is not always possible to keep the
agendas in all the villages synchronised over time and so some of the activities will have been undertaken in some of the villages and not
others. This summary allows the team to track where the process is in each village.
Jun-17
VILLAGE
Current
practices
CC
mapping
Baseline
w/s 2
(Cropping
practices
Visioning
and
scenarios
Champion
s/ Local
facilitators
New
practice
training
Farmer
experime
ntation
Individual
farm
experiment
designs
Tunnel
constru
ction
Drip kit
construc
tion
RWH and
erosion
control
assessments
Five
Fingers
Vision and
scenarios
SelectionTraining Contours
Diversio
n
ditches,
Mulching
trench
beds
Shallow
trenches
greywater
bucket filter
Keyhol
e beds
Tower
garden
s
Soil
properties
Soil fertility (manure,
compost liquid manure,
fertilizers)
Planting
seed and
seedlings
CA Ecocircles
Natural pest
and disease
control
Sedawa √√√√√√√√√√ √√√√√√√√√√√ √
Botshabelo √√√√√√√√√√√√√√ √√√√√√√
Willows √√√√√√√√√√√√√ √√√√√√√
Oaks √√√√√√√√√√√ √√√√√√√
Finala √√√√√√√√√√√ √√√√√√√
Lepelle √√√√√√√√√√√√√√√ √√
Introductiontoinnovations and
Learningandmentoring
Baseline
AWARD baseline and implementationpervillage: 2016-2017
14
5. Individual Experimentation
Here a summary is provided of the individual experimentation undertaken in each of the villages. This will be updated in all future reports.
INDIVIDUAL EXPERIMENTATION
Jun-17
Date
Village
Description of experiment
No of
participants
Name of participants
Nov-16
Sedawa, Lepelle,
Oaks, Finala, Willows,
Botshabelo
Diversion ditches, contours (using line levels), trench
beds, planting seeds and seedlings, greywater filtration
for irrigation,
See attendance registers
Dec-16
Sedawa, lepelle,
Oaks, Finala, Willows
Conservation Agriculture plot : 10mx10m tramline
intercropping of maize and sugar beans and maize and
cowpeas. Planted in basins and rows.
50
See attendance registers
Feb-17
Sedawa, Oaks and
Finala
Liquid manure, shallow trenches
27
See attendance registers
2017/01/31
The Oaks
Diversion ditches, trench beds, CA
4
Mr Makudu, Janet Lewelle,
Florence Lewelle, Betty Ncgogo,
2017/01/31
Finala
Tower garden, CA, drip kits
27
Sarah Nyathi
2017/02/01
Sedawa
Tunnel: vs normal production experiments
1
Christina
2017/02/01
Lepelle
CA, diversion ditches, trench beds
4 (8)
George Sebatane, Jane Kobeni,
Sias Sebuyane, Londi Tsilwane
2017/02/06
Sedawa
Basin planting: Control is the normal way 30cmx30cm
basins 50cm apart, Trial is inclusion of manure nad
lucerne hay in the basin prior to planting and mulching
between basins
1
Mrs Matene
15
2017/02/06
Sedawa
Planting a selection of vegetable seeds: Butternut, onion,
rosemary, coriander, chilli, green pepper, squash, lazy
house wife (beans), Swiss chard, chinese cabbage, carrot,
okra, parsley, spring onion, turnip (2 types (white and
red), egg plant, tomatoes
19
See Learning and Innovations
report -Sedawa
2017/02/28
Oaks, Finala,Sedawa
Mulching CA plots
27
See attendance registers
2017/04/19,26
Sedawa, Willows
Pest and disease control brews, planting of herbs and
indigenous trees
24
See attendance registers
2017/03/14
Sedawa
CA, trench beds, diversified cropping
Maria Malepe
2017/04/19-
2017/06/02
Botshabelo, Sedawa,
Willows,
Natural pest and disease control brews, planting of
indigenous and multipurpose plants
47
See attendance registers
2017/06/19
Botshabelo,
Mametje, Sedawa,
the Oaks
Individaul homestead based tunnel construction, with
three 6x1m trenchbeds
10
See Milestone 5 report
2017/06/19
Botshabelo, Sedawa,
Willows,
Household implementation of underground RWH storage
tanks
4
See Milestone 5 report
2017/06/20
Sedawa
Trench beds and shallow trenches used extensively in
their gardens
4
Alex Mokgopa, Norah Mahlaku,
Christina Thobejane, Magdalene
Molepe
16
6. Summary of milestone implementation across villages.
MAHLATHINI
MILESTONE COMPLETION: target completion to date % (in black) vs actual (in red)
Key activities /
Milestones
MILESTONE 1
MILESTONE 2
MILESTONE 3
MILESTONE 4
MILESTONE 5
MILESTONE 6
MILESTONE 7
Inception report
100% / 100%
Setting the scene
67% / 65%
100% / 80%
100% / 90%
100% / 100%
Comment:
less coverage,
more villages
visioning + final
LFs outstanding
Some visioning
+ 2 LFs
outstanding
LF selection and training
complete. Additional
visioning in Lepelle
Learning and
mentoring
10% / 15%
30%/ 40%
50%/65%
70%/85%
90%
100%
Comment:
6 villages not 4
6 villages Some
garden mon +
LF outstanding
6 villages;
continuation with
learning schedule;
LFs elected in 3
villages
6 villages; continuation with
learning schedule; soil
fertility and P&d control.
Mentoring and garden
monitoring by LFs
Experimentation &
intro to innovations
25%
25% / 50%
50%/75%
75%/85%
90%
100%
Comment:
for all 6 villages
6 villages not 4
6 villages
For all 6 villages
Collaborative work
Comment:
25%/40%
6 villages:
Introduction to
drip kits and
tunnels; 3 villages
RWH and erosion
control options
50%/65%
6 villages; tunnels, drip kits,
greywater management,
RWH and erosion control
options
75%
100%
Networking and cross
visits
25%/25%
cluster based
workshop in good
farming practices
50%/50%
Open day: cross visit of all
learning groups. World
biodiversity day workshop
75%
100%
Comment:
17
7. Monthly team assessment
Indicators: Assessment June 2017
Figures in the table reflect numbers for the period of reporting, in this case April-June2017.
A combined team meeting to review this assessment sheet has not been conducted in the
reporting period. Figures have been summarised from field reports and discussions with the
field team.
Indicator
Overall
target
Actual_Nov
2016
Actual_June
2017
No of participants in learning
groups
100
108
73 (Open day, Soil
fertility and natural
P&D control
workshops)
No of learning groups
5
5
5
No of local facilitators
5
7
Percentage of participants
engaged in CC adaptation
responses
1-2 (45%)
2-3 (25%)
>3 (10-15%)
1-2 (10%)
1-2 (67%)
2-3 (15%) for
this time period
OVERALL:
1-2 (60%)
2-3(15%)
No of participants
experimenting with new
innovations
-local
-co-designed
15
45
5
5
50
No of participants showing
increased knowledge
80
73
Percentage of participants
engaged in collaborative
activities
45%
-
14%-individual
implementation of
tunnels and drip
kits- 10
Underground
RWH tanks -4
Percentage of participants with
improved livelihoods
-increased availability of food
-increased income
-increased diversity of
activities and livelihoods
options
40%
5%
5%
-
-
-
(summarised from
garden monitoring
-15%
-
-
Qualitative assessments;
-stakeholder engagement
-Increased understanding and
agency to act towards
increased resilience
-Adaptation and innovations
into local context
Stories, case
studies,
photos, cluster
activity
records, group
session
minutes,
Stories:
-Open day
-Underground
storage tanks
implementation
-garden
monitoring
18
-Potential for increased
resilience
-Social engagement
Understanding:
Examples of people
showing an increased
understanding of CCA
adaptation
-For many participants, the value of the open day was
the realisation of how the different practices
introduced work together to create a more robust
gardening system. They mentioned repeatedly how
they initially thought we were playing, but now they
could see how the different elements fit together .
Actions:
Examples of people
showing an increased
agency towards increasing
their resilience
-For the winter planting season a substantialnumber
of participants have initiated their intensive
homestead food gardens under difficult conditions
and with very little water available. Participants have
made trench beds, planted seedlings, used mulching,
implemented mixed cropping, planted herbs and
multipurpose trees and shrubs, made liquid manure,
used pest control brews and constructed diversion
ditches and stone bunds.
-MiriamMalepe has commented thatshe only needs
to water every3rd day with the organic matter and
mulching in her trench beds.This has given her time
to embark on other activities, such as making grass
brooms that she sells at the local pension pay-out
point.
-Patricia Ngobeni from Lepelle mentioned that
mulching surpasses weed growth and that she now
has more time to stay by theside of the road and sell
her produce-as her weeding time is substantially
reduced.
Examples of increased
potential towards
resilience
-Tunnel,trench beds, diversion ditches, conservation
agriculture, grey water management and use,
rainwater harvesting and storage
Project Life Change Questions:
1. Do we have examples or stories of how we or others are in the process of adaptive
management relatedto CC? (adapt, reflectand respond to….) and examples of
what this adaptivemanagement is?
This is evident in a number of small changes and improvements made by participants
in the gardening practices:
The traditional practices of using furrows and ridges for planting have been
combined with the introduced shallow trenches by at least 5 participants.
Shallow trenches provide for incorporation of organic matter intothe soil and
improve fertility and water holding
Trench beds are being used for production of seedlings and have been
expanded substantially by a number of participants. A few have now
constructed as manyas 10-14 of these beds-in different shapes andsizes
Participants have been cutting grass and collecting leaves for mulching their
gardens
Participants have used the diversion ditches to plant sweet potatoes and
other crops on theridges and fruit trees and other plants in the ditches
19
themselves. Additionally, a few have mulched the ditches and ridges to good
effect.
A number of participants have put contours in their gardens and made stone
lines, swales and terraces to reducerun-off form their plots.
Small nurseries are being implemented by a selection of the more
enthusiastic gardeners prorogation of fruit trees, indigenous fruit and
moringa is common.
A few participants have used diversion ditches to lead water to specific
sections of their gardens
Mixed cropping within the vegetable beds is no consciously being practiced.
Surplus production is being offered to creches and vulnerable people in the
community.
2. Do we have stories that show innovation or lack of innovation towards positive
change? What insights have we gained into how innovation can lead to positive
change?(INCREASED RESILIENCE)
About 65% of participants have tried out some of the new innovations introduced and
are able to clearly articulate the potential benefits of these practices.
3. Do we have stories that show evidence of, or an interest in self organisation towards
collective action? Whatinsights have we gained into how self organisationcan lead
to collective action?
Local facilitators are alreadyplaying an important role in bringing people together and
providing for collective action, albeit on the level of working in the gardens. They are
dealing with conflict in the groups and supporting individuals in their implementation.
They are coordinating some collective action in the villages.
4. Do we have stories to show that learning together is happening or that there is an
interest in learning together? What insights have we gainedabout how to learn
together?
5. Do we have stories of how we and or others are ableto think systemically? What
insights have we gained?
6. Do we have stories of how we and or others are able to be inclusive and democratic?
What insights have we gained about how this can be achieved?(STAKEHOLDER
ENGAGEMENT).
Stakeholder engagement has been somewhat difficult to achieve. Mostly
stakeholders become involved to ensure that others are supporting theiragenda and
to further particular projects or programmes of their own. There is little appreciation of
the concept of sharing.
20
7. Work Plans for the coming three months.
See the attached calendar (Attachment 6) for July-September2017-Specific activities have
not been included for August -September as these will be dependent on progress made in
the July-August session)
The focus for the coming three months will be consolidation of [practicesand activities
introduced, garden monitoring and finalisation of construction of tunnels and RWH tanks. In
addition, cross visits are to be arranged for local facilitators and participant farmers. The CC
dialogues process is to be implemented and supported in all six villages.Below is a more
detailed list of planned activities.
1. Continuation of garden monitoring and support for Local Facilitators in this process
is planned. In addition, local facilitators are to be supported to run mini workshops
on practices with gardeners who are still unclear or were not involved in those
learning workshops.
2. Collaborative work around construction of the 10 individual tunnels in Botshabelo,
Mametje and Sedawa is to continue. Participants have undertaken to build these
tunnels together
3. The construction of the 4 underground rainwater storage structures is to be
continued and supported by bringing in an experienced building team to assist.
These two gentlemen will work with the householders and stay in Sedawa for 1-2
weeks during July and August
4. Collaborative work on erosion control in andaround homesteads will be initiated if
possible.
5. A cross visit to Ukuvuna or another appropriate site is to be planned for farmer
participants
6. Small cross visits for the Local Facilitators to neighbouring villages will be
important, for them to see different examples of good gardening practices and how
they can support such initiatives in their own areas
7. The DICLAD CCdialogues are to be set up and run in the area
8. Learning processes around nutrition and value adding as well as fruit production
will be introduced asappropriate.
21
Attachment 1: Invitation to Farmers’ Open day for the AgriSI programme
Invitation to attend farmers cross visit organised by Mahlathini Development Foundation in
collaboration with AWARD under the AgriSI project
To whom it may concern
You arecordially invited to the smallholder farmers cross visit (farmers day) meeting of the
agricultural support initiative (AgriSI) in Sedawa village on the 25thof April 2017. AgriSI isa
sub programme of the resilience in the Olifants River basin cross country programme funded
by USAID and managed by Association for water and rural development (AWARD). The AgriSI
provides a systematic exploration of climate change impacts in 6 villages (Botshabelo, Sedawa,
The Oaks, The Willows, Fenale and Lepelle) along the Olifants River in the Hoedspruit area of
Limpopo.
In partnership with AWARD and Seeds of Light (SOL), Mahlathini development foundation
(MDF) has been implementing various innovations and experimentation with the 6 villages in
the Hoedspruit area. These innovations include design of trench beds, design of water
diversion channels, construction of tunnels, conservation agriculture,making liquid manure
and making natural pest control mixtures.
The aim of the cross visit is to bring farmers from the 6 villages and the stakeholders interested
in agricultural development in the areatogether to share information regarding the
innovations and providing a platform for building networks for farmers.
The cross visit will be held at Sedawa village on the 25thof April 2017 at09: 00 AM. The theme
of the day will be around experimentation with current local farming practises and newly
introduced farming innovations. Farmers will be sharing results of their experimentation with
the innovations they have been introduced to and how their involvement in the AgriSI project
has contributed to their knowledge in farming.
Kindly find directions bellow and RSVP tothe following people:
Mahlathini Development foundation
Mr Sylvester Selala
Snr Researher and Facilitator
071 596 5866
Or
Association for Water and Rural Development
Mr Bigboy Mkhabela
Community Facilitator
082 305 7760
22
Attachment 2: Programme for the Farmers’ Open day in Sedawa, 25 April 2017
Sedawa Farmers Cross Visit Day
THEME: Experimentation with current local farming
practises and newly introduced farming innovations
Date:25 April 2017
Time: 09:00 AM
Venue: Sedawa village
Program Director: Sylvester Selala
ITEM
RESPONSIBILITY
Opening prayer
Tomson Motseo
Welcoming of guests
Erna Kruger
Stakeholder Introductions
Bigboy Mkhabela
1. Introduction to innovation
Sylvester Selala
Demonstration of innovations
1. Water movement and design of
diversion channels
Orbet Motseo (Willows)
2. Conservation agriculture
Kgasudi Lema and Meisi
3. Liquid manure
Esinah Malepe
4. Trench beds
Alex Mogopa and Florence Lewele
5. Planting in tunnel vs. outside the tunnel
Christina Thobejane
General (introduction to otherprojects in the
area)
Lima, Department of Agriculture, K2C, LED
office
Vote of thanks
George Sebatana
8. Closing Prayer
Tomson Motseo
LUNCH
23
Attachment 3: Programme for World Biodiversity Day workshop in Sedawa
24
Attachment 4: Programme for CC dialogues at community level.
DICLAD Module 1 outline of dialogue topics
Participants are broken up into small groups (no more than 8 in each). There is a facilitator
per group.
1. Facilitator asks,
What does climate change (CC) mean for you?
[Each participant uses small cards to write down whatever they think CC mean for them.] 2.
Facilitator asks,
What do you thinkCC means for your area (referring to a geographical area)?
[Again, each participant uses small cards to write down their thoughts. One thought per
card.]
3. Facilitator asks eachparticipant to take turn to explain their cards from the first question.
4. Facilitator asks eachparticipant to take turn to explain their cards from the first question.
5. Temperature and rainfall exercise (refer to the table below).
Process & facilitation questions
1. Participants break out into four small groups, according to a common geographical area where
participants work.
2. The facilitator opens the conversation by asking each participant:
Where do you work/live?
Go around the group, giving each participant an opportunity to answer.
25
3. emperature chart for a typical year
3.1.The facilitator draws an y and x axis on a blank flipchart, and asks the participants:
How many months are there in the year?
Can you please write down the months evenly spaced along this line (indicating the x
axis)?
3.2.The facilitator begins to discuss temperatures by asking the following:
In this area where you work/live, which month is typically the hottest month?
Which month is typically the coldest month?
3.3.The facilitator asks participants to use the sticks to represent the temperature, using a
short stick to indicate the coldest month and a long stick to indicate the hottest month.
3.4.Continue with the process by guiding participants to put in sticks to represent the
temperatures of the other months. For example, ask:
Is January hotter than February but cooler than December? If so, then January will have a
longer stick than February, but a shorter stick than December, correct?
4. Temperature chart under climate change
4.1.The facilitator introduces climate change by adding length with a koki to all the
temperature sticks, demonstrating how the temperature increases for all the months (i.e.
it gets hotter). Note that the approach is that of “show-and-tell” instead of asking
prompting questions.
26
5. Rainfall chart for a typical year
5.1.As with temperatures, the facilitator draws the y and x axis of the chart, and asks a
participant to add the months.
5.2.The facilitator begins to discuss rainfall by asking the following:
In this area where you work/live, which month typically gets the most rain? Which one is
the wettest?
Which month do you get the least amount of rain? Which month is the driest?
Please use these sticks to represent the rain, using a short stick indicate least amount of
rain and a long stick to indicate the most rain.
5.3.The facilitator asks participants to use the sticks to represent rain, using a short stick to
indicate the least amount of rain and a long stick to indicate the most rain.
5.4.Continue with the process by guiding participants to put in sticks to represent the rainfall
of the other months. For example, ask:
Is January wetter than February but drier than December?
6. Rainfall chart under climate change
6.1.The facilitator introduces climate change by giving the following explanation:
Climate change can mean various changes to the rainfall. One possible change is the timing of
rainfall being shifted later. For example, some of the rain in October/November may only come
in December…
[While explaining this, facilitator takes the stick for October/November and breaks a small
piece off to add to December]
…and the rainy season may end earlier.
[While explaining this, facilitator takes the stick for May and breaks a small piece off to add to
January.]
6.2.The facilitator asks the following question:
How do these changes affect the pattern of rainfall?
27
6.3.The Facilitator explains further:
The rainfall amount for the year may stay the same, but it is concentrated in fewer months.
6.4.The facilitator asks:
Can you think of any way that rainfall can change? Can you show it with the sticks or draw it
with the koki?
6.5.The facilitator wraps-up this part of the activity by stating:
With rainfall, there are multiple ways that it can change. This presents a special challenge.
Why? Because we have to consider multiple scenarios instead of one. For example, we need to
address both dry periods and flooding.
7. Plenary discussion
As groups finish their charts, these are pasted onto the wall for all to see.
When all groups have completed their temperature and rainfall charts, participants regroup
for a plenary discussion around the following:
We’ve talked about what climate change could look like, how it can change what we now see
as a “typical year” regarding temperature and rainfall. Reflecting on this, how do you think will
this change impact you and your work?
The main facilitator of this session will lead this discussion with support from the other
facilitators.
8. Closing
The main facilitator of this session wraps-up the process, stating how this exercise will feed
into the next Indaba Cycle where we will be looking in more depth at the impacts and what
can be done about them.
6. Facilitator uses the photographs (i.e. of increasing temperature, flood and drought) as
three separate entry-points, and asks each participant to choose five top impacts (may be
framed as concerns) that he/shehas for each of the entry-points.
7. Based on what participants say, facilitator helps them to think of the relationship between
these different impacts of CC by prompting how the different cards relate to each other
and the entry-point.
8. Facilitator helps the group to look at the completed concept mapsand prepare a
designated rapporteur to report back in plenary.
9. Plenary. Each group reports back.
28
10. At the plenary, someone from the KRA4 can add any additional impacts that may not
have been discussed. This is to enrich the group’s understanding about CC impacts.
Activity: Systemic look at risks, vulnerability and potential adaptation
actions Instruction sheet for facilitators
There would be 3 groups, randomly composed. Each group would have a facilitator to
following the same steps below.
1. Setting up theconcept map
At each group, there will be a partially constructed concept map (CM). Each facilitator
explains to the group:
This is a CM done by the AgriSI group in the last DICLAD training. The yellow cards capture
what increasing temperature and changing rainfall mean for smallscale farming in the Lower
Olifants.
Each facilitator walks his/her group through the yellow cards on the CM, explaining the
linkages. Then, facilitator explains,
We have thought of some additional impacts of increasing temperature and changing
rainfall. These are represented by blue cards. Where would these cards fit in the CM?
Facilitator prompts the group to place the newcards, and explain the relationship between
them and the entry-points and other cards on the CM.
NB: At the end of the process, the new cards are added to the CM with linkages
drawn.
2. Stating the objective for the next few steps.
Facilitator explains,
Now we will do anexercise with you to address the question of whether this sub-system of
smallscale farming in the Lower Olifants is at risk.
29
3. Exploring threats
Facilitator explains,
If a threat is something that could cause harm, then where doyou see threats in this CM?
Facilitator may use an analogy of “a knife in a kitchen” to further explain the concept of
threat if the participants struggle with the earlier explanation.
If participants confuse threats with impacts, then ask participants,
Is this a consequenceof a threat, or something that can cause harm?
Facilitator may acknowledge that it can be difficult sometimes to tease apart the
consequences and threats.
Facilitator asks participants to mark “T” on the cards that are threats.
3. Exploring vulnerability & resilience
Facilitator explains,
If vulnerability refers to either how likely for something to be affected by a threat, or how well
can something/someone cope/adapt to a threat, then where do you see vulnerability in the
CM?
Facilitator may use the analogy of an adult’s vs a toddler’s vulnerability to a knife in the
kitchen.
To help participants to think through this, the facilitator can prompt,
How is this a vulnerability?
Facilitator asks participants to mark “V” on the cards that arevulnerability.
Facilitator explains,
If we are referring to resilience as the opposite of vulnerability, then where do you see
resilience in the CM?
To help participants to think through this, the facilitator can prompt,
How does this give resilience?
Facilitator asks participants to mark “R” on the cards that are resilience.
Tying it together…
Facilitator summarizes the threats and vulnerabilities on the CM. Then, facilitator asks,
Is this sub-system at risk?
30
3. Potential adaptation
Facilitator asks,
Can you think of potential ways to adapt to these threats and vulnerabilities?
Facilitator prompts further discussion by asking,
What do you mean by this adaptation? How does this idea work?
Facilitator can purposely suggest some untenableadaptation options.
NB: Participants write the adaptation on small cards in a different colour than those
already on the flipchart.
4. Ranking
Facilitator asks the participants to vote on the potential adaptation options.
If you were to choose three most tenable adaptation options by that we mean socially
appropriate and financiallyfeasible as well which one would you pick? You can use the
sticker to indicate your vote.
Facilitator asks participants on each of the chosen options,
Why did you choose this option?
5. Action planning, relating to other Res-O projects
Facilitator wraps upthe exercise by explaining that the adaptation options that would
emerge from the CC dialogue should eventually be embedded in the activities supported by
other Res-O projects. The step that would follow is action planning, which wouldnot be done
in this session.
31
Attachment 5: Agenda for Commuity based Visioining Exercise in Lepelle_1 June
2017
PROPOSED VISIONING EXERCISE LELPELLE MDF/AWARD -MAY 2017
Draft May 12 2017 R Hatfield
Note: the following is anoutline for comment, rather than describing a full
methodology.
It is based on a methodology that I have used quite extensively and successfully in
East Africa.
OBJECTIVES:
1. To provide context for a proposed or current project’s activities (AgriSI, INR
CbE, etc).
2. To facilitate action planningfor a proposed or current project.
Note: this exercise compliments the VSTEEP process.
Component 1: Looking Back
Self-assessment reviewing past, present, future including drivers of change.
Self-assessment of drivers (desired, undesired; level of influence over them).
Component 2: Looking Forwards
Future visioning consisting of 3 main parts:
A. Quality of Life (value-based) = how life needs to BE
B. Future Resource Base = what is needed to support A = HAVE
C. Forms of Production = what needs to put in place or created = DO
(note: A is a ‘blue-sky’ vision which B & C help channel into more concrete terms)
Component 3: Strategic Planning
Prioritizing priority areas emerging from C.
(preceded by): Decision-making criteria for priority areas(social-
environmental-livelihood basic set if criteria).
Component 4: Action Planning
Identifying and prioritizing project action / activities in the context of
Component 3.
Work planning detail: what, who, when, how.
32
Attachment 6: Detailed upcoming milestone (Milestone 6) activity plans (July-September 2017)
AWARD AgriSi calendar-Mahlathini
July-September 2017
CALENDAR
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Feb-17
27
28
1
2
3
4
5
Jul
2017
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Sylvester, building
team
25
Sylvester,
building team
26
Sylvester,
Erna, Chris
27
Sylvester,
Erna, Chris
28
Sylvester,
Erna, Chris
29
Sylvester,
Erna, Chris
30
RWH tanks, garden
monitoring
RWH tanks, garden
monitoring
RWH tanks ,DICLAD -
Botshabelo
RWH tanks, garden
monitoring
RWH tanks, garden
monitoring
RWH tanks, DICLAD-
Fenala, Oaks
31
Sylvester, Trygive
1
Sylvester, Trygive
2
Sylvester, Trygive
3
Sylvester,
Trygive
4
Sylvester,
Trygive
5
6
garden monitoring
LF cross visit
LF cross visit
garden monitoring
garden monitoring
Aug
2017
7
8
9
National
Women's Day
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
1
2
3
33
Sep
2017
4
8
9
10
11
12
AWARD
13
AWARD
14
AWARD
15
AWARD
16
17
partners meeting
partners meeting
18
AWARD
19
AWARD
20
AWARD
21
AWARD
22
AWARD
23
24
Heritage
Day
25
26
27
28
29
30
1