Milestone 4 Progress Report 3

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1
RESILIM-O:
Resilience intheLimpopo Basin
ProgramOlifants
MILESTONE 4: ProgressReport #3:
February-March 2017
under the
Lower Olifants catchment
Agricultural Support Initiative (AgriSI)
Implemented by
2
Table of Contents
............................................................................................................................................. 3
Outline .................................................................................................................................. 4
1. Activity record for the period........................................................................................... 5
2. Progress ........................................................................................................................ 6
Milestone 4: February-March 2017: Progress according to deliverables............................ 6
3. Summary of baseline and implementation progress per village.................................... 10
4. Individual Experimentation........................................................................................... 10
5. Summary of milestone implementation across villages................................................ 12
6. Monthly team assessment........................................................................................... 13
Indicators: Assessment March 2017:............................................................................... 13
Project Life Change Questions:....................................................................................... 14
7. Work Plans for the coming two months........................................................................ 15
Attachment 1: Detailed upcoming milestone (Milestone 5) activity plans (April-May 2017).16
3
4
Outline
In the inception meeting an implementation strategy that would bring all 6 communities on
board at the same time and include some baseline and visioning discussions at community
level as well as some theoretical inputs and practical training, was agreed to. This was done
to accommodate for the fact that people are anxious to start agricultural activities now in the
Spring and Summer season and for us as the facilitators to provide a commitment to the
communities to action.
This meant that activities planned under later milestones (particularly Module 3 ‘Introduction
to Innovations & Experimentation’) were brought forwardand added to originally planned
activities (Module 1 ‘Setting the Scene’ and Module 2 ‘Learning & Mentoring’); whilst
accommodating 6 villages. Now towards the end of Milestone 4, a balance has been
reached with implementation of all the modules.
Individual/household interviews and baseline assessments, to augment thebaseline reports
have now been conducted for a selection of participants acrossall 6 villages (33 in total to
date).
Visioning, planning and development of indicators forthe 5 fingers assessment framework
(principles for good farming practices) has been undertaken for all 6 villages in a joint
workshop. Individual and group sessions will be held to finalise and operationalise the
framework in each of the villagesin the coming months.
5 Learning groups have beenestablished: Botshabelo, Sedawa, Finale&Oaks, Willows and
Lepelle. Local facilitators have come tothe forein all five learning groups. The formalisation
of the process has been finalised for all 5groups andinduction and trainingwill continue
under Milestone 5.
Learning in the groups has continued and focused on soil fertility management, including
liquid manures with some input also on natural pest and disease control options.Mentoring
and monitoring at household level has been conducted in 2villages.
New ideas have been introduced through demonstration and implementation workshops:
1Workshop for The Oaks, Finala, Lepelle,Botshabelo and Sedawain construction
of a 4mx6m shade cloth structure/tunnel, construction and packing of 3 1mx6m
trench beds inside the tunnel and setting up of a drip irrigation system for the tunnel.
(22 participants)
Learningand innovation group workshops were held for Sedawa(27), Oaks and
Finala(9).Learning content includes ,soil fertility options, manure, liquid manures,
compost and shallow trenches. Mulching of CA plots and basin plantings was also
included.
PARTICIPANTSTHIS PERIOD
SEEDS OF LIGHT, Trygive Nxumalo
MAHLATHINI: Erna Kruger, Sylvester Selala, Chris Stimie
AWARD: Richard Hatfield, BigboyMkhabela,
CONTENTS
5
This report contains the following sections:
1. Activity record for the period
2. Progress
3. Summary of baseline and implementation progress per village
4. Individual experimentation
5. Summary of milestone implementation across villages
6. Monthly team review summary and assessment of indicators
7. Work plan for coming period
This report contains the following attachments:
1. Annexures:
a) Group session minutes: Learning and innovation workshop-Sedawa_20170206
b) Group session minutes: Learning and innovation workshop-the Oaks and Finala -
20170208
c)Group session minutes: Lepelle Water walk and fruit production case study
_20170202
d) Homestead assessments_ Local and New innovations_20170310
e) Cluster activity record: Principles for good farming practices workshop_20170315-16
f) Cluster activity record: Demonstration workshop for construction of tunnel, trench
beds and drip kit system_20170318,20
g) Monitoring_ Implementation of innovations_ Botshabelo and Sedawa_20170313-14
h) AWARD-AgSI_Selection of Local facilitators_20170323
1. Activity record for the period
This is an additional section now being included in the progress reports to outline
activities undertaken in the reporting period.This section gives an indication of activities
undertaken to achieve the outcomes for this period, time spent and people involved.
DATE
DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITY
WHO WAS
INVOLVED
2016/02/01
Learning and mentoring: CCA criteria and
models workshop: AWARD and MDF staff
8hrs
Taryn Ancoise,
Richard, BB, Seeds of
Light and Erna,
Sylvester
2016/02/02
Learning and mentoring: Water walk and
homestead based assessments: Lepelle
10hrs
Erna, Sylvester,
Trygive, BB, Lepelle (7
homesteads)
2016/02/03
Learning and mentoring: Homestead based
assessments: The Oaks, Finale 6hrs
Erna, BB, Sylvester,
The Oaks andfFnale
(6 homesteads)
2016/02/04
Office; report writing, consolidation of photos
and attendance registers, preparation for
following week’s workshops – buying of hay
bales and collection of manure 6hrs
Erna, Sylvester
2016/02/06
Innovations and experimentation: Sedawe: Soil
fertility workshop 7hrs
Sylvester, BB, Trygive
6
2016/02/07
Innovations and experimentation:Workshop
continuation plus homestead assessments 8
hrs
Sylvester, BB, intern
2016/02/08
Learning and mentoring: Homestead
assessments in Willows 5hrs
Collection of bales and manure3hrs
Sylvester, BB
2016/02/09
Innovations and experimentation: The Oaks,
Finale soil fertility learning workshop and
homestead assessments-8 hrs
Sylvester, Trygive BB,
Intern
2016/02/10
Office admin; B2O report 5hrs
Sylvester, BB, Richard
2017/03/13,14
Learning and mentoring, collaborative work:
Homestead visits for mentoring and monitoring,
start set up of tunnel workshop in Oaks;
Botshabelo, Sedawe
Planning meeting
Sylvester, Christine
and 12 participants,
Erna
2017/03/15-
16
Networking, Visioning and 5 fingers w/s for all 6
villages
Full AWARD team,
Mahlathini, Ukuvuna,
all 6 villages
2017/03/17
Networking and collaborative work: Preparation
for workshop;
Office; finalisation of deliverables review and
changes, design of 5 fingers assessment forms,
garden monitoring forms
Sylvester, Chris, Erna
richard
2017/03/18
Networking and collaborative work: OAKS:
Trench bed, tunnel construction and drip kit
demonstration and implementation
(Oaks, Finale, Lepelle,
Botshabelo, Sedawa
Erna, Sylvester, Chris,
Trygive
2017/03/19
Admin and planning
Erna, Sylvester, Chris
2017/03/20
Networking and collaborative work: OAKS:
Trench bed, tunnel construction and drip kit
demonstration and implementation ;
continuation of construction of tunnel and drip
kit
(Oaks, Finale, Lepelle,
Botshabelo, Sedawa
Erna, Sylvester, Chris,
trygive
2017/03/22,23
Networking: LF election and induction,
household monitoring visits
Progress report writing
Sylvester, Trygive
Oaks, Botshabelo,
Willows, Erna
2. Progress
Milestone 4: February-March 2017: Progress according to deliverables
1. Setting the scene
This deliverable was originally to be concluded under milestone 3. A few activities
have been continued under Milestone 4.
Activities
planned
Activities
actual
% completion
to date (target
/ actual)
Verification
Submitted
7
Setting
the
scene
2 villages
x 3 days
ea
6villages
x 1 day ea
100% / 75% -
LF’s chosen for
4 of 6 villages
Attendance
registers
Group
session
minutes
Cluster
activity report
Yes
100% /50% -
Group session
and cluster
workshop of 3
days run by
AWARD for
development of
vision and 5
fingers criteria
for beast
practice_ all
villages
100% -
100%Individual
homestead
assessments for
33 participants
across all
villages
completed
Homestead
assessments,
photo diaries
Yes
In progress
Local facilitator criteriadeveloped and used in 4 of 6 villages to select local
facilitators.-Report attached: Learning and innovation workshop -
Sedawa_20170206, Learning and innovation workshop
Botshabelo_20170322
Water walk and homestead assessments Lepelle-Report attached.
A combined workshop for all villages to compile a broad vision for each area,
principles for good farming practices and a 5 fingers monitoring assessment
framework for each village_Report attached: Principles for good farming
practices _20170315,16
2. Introduction to innovations and experimentation
Activities
planned
Activities
actual
Outputs
% completion
Verification
Submitte
d
Introduc-
tion
to
innovation
and
experimen-
tation
4 villages
x 2days
ea
5 villages
x 2 days
ea,
3villages
x 1day ea
Understan
d current
practices,
introduce
new ideas
100% / 110%
(Tunnel,bucket
drip kits
Learning
materials
Yes- EK
Demonstrations
Photographic
records
Individual
farm
experimen
tal design,
homestea
d food
production
monitoring
100% -ongoing
process of
individual
household
assessment and
planning
Homestead
assessment
forms (Oaks
(5), Lepelle (7),
Finale (5),
Sedawe (3),
Botshabelo (4),
Willows (9)
Yes- EK
Demonstration of new ideas in the form of community based workshops for
construction of a tunnel (Shade cloth structure 4mx5m called a tall crop
8
tunnel), bucket drip kits for greywater use and building of trench beds for
planting of seed and seedlings for The Oaks, Finale, Lepelle, Botshabelo and
Sedawa.
Homestead based assessments for present implementation in gardening
(including farmer work plans and individual experimentation0 conducted for
33 participants across all 6 villages._Report attached_Homesated
assessments -Local and new innovations _20170310
Initial assessments for potential for underground RWH storage structures at
household level done for 1-2 households in Botshabelo.
3. Learning and mentoring
Activities
planned
Activities
actual
Outputs
% completion
to date (target
/ actual)
Verification
Submitted
Learning
and
mentoring
4 villages
x 3 days
ea
6 villages
x 2 days
ea
New
practice
training:
Soil fertility
100%/ 50%Soil
fertility:
Conducted for 3
villages The
Oaks, Finale and
Sedawa. Further
training under
milestone 5.
Training
manual
Yes-
attendance
registers,
Yes-
collected-
Sylvester
photos,
Yes
collected-
with EK
farmer work
plans,
Yes See
Homestead
assessments
report
garden
monitoring
Yes-See
Homestead
assessments
report
Local
facilitators
/
champions
training
and
mentoring
100% / 65%
PROGRESS
REPORT
Yes-
Farmer
monitoring
50% / 45% -
garden level
monitoring of
implementation
and
experimentation
See
Homestead
assessment
forms and
report
Yes-
Clusters;
self
mentoring
100% -See
Principles for
good farming
practices w/s
report
Visioning
and 5 fingers
for all 6
villages
Yes
Learning workshops were conducted in soil fertility management. This included the
following topics:
oLocal understanding of soil fertility, use of kraal manure, current practises
used to improve soil fertility.
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oIntroduction to soil fertility (local understanding of signs of nutrient deficiency
on the crops, discussing signs of nutrient deficiency, nitrogen (N),
Phosphorus (P), Potassium (K))
oMethods or waysto improve soil fertility (liquid manure, use of fertilizers)
oUse of mulch (hay and Lucerne in CA plots) and
oNatural pestcontrol (e.g. aphids)
Mentoring and monitoring was conducted through the homestead based
assessments and also through a village based assessment of individual
experimentation in Botshabelo and Sedawe, that included the newly elected local
facilitators.
4. Collaborative activities
Joint workshops on principles for good farming practices for all 6 villages and
trench beds, tunnel and drip kit construction for 5 villages. See no’s 2 and 3
above and the attached reports.
5. Networking
Discussions with Ukuvuna re their implementation process and practices in
Sekukune
10
3. Summary of baseline and implementation progress per village
This table provides an overview and summary of all activities undertaken on a village by village level. It is not always possible to keep the
agendas in all the villages synchronised over time and so some of the activities will have been undertaken in some of the villages and not
others. This summary allows the team to track where the process is in each village.
4. Individual Experimentation
Here a summary is provided of the individual experimentation undertaken in each of the villages. This will be updated in all future reports.
Mar-17
VILLAGE
Current
practices
CC mapping
Baseline
w/s 2
(Cropping
practices
Visioning
and
scenarios
Champions/
Local
facilitators
New
practice
training
Farmer
experiment
ation
Individual farm
experiment
designs
Tunnel
construction
Drip kit
construction
RWH and erosion
control
assessments
Five Fingers
Vision and
scenarios
SelectionTraining Contours
Diversion
ditches,
trench beds
greywater
bucket filter
Keyhole
beds
Tower
gardens
Soil
properties
Soil fertility (manure,
compostliquid manure,
fertilizers)
Planting
seed and
seedlings
CA
Sedawa √√√√ √ √ √√ √√ √ √ √√√√
Botshabelo √ √ √√√ √ √ √√ √ √ √√√√
Willows √ √ √√ √ √ √√ √ √√√
Oaks √ √ √√√ √ √ √√ √ √√ √ √√√
Finala √ √ √√ √ √ √√ √ √√ √ √√√
Lepelle √ √ √√ √ √ √√√ √√√√
Introductiontoinnovationsandexperimentation
Learningandmentoring
Baseline
AWARD baseline and implementation per village: 2016-2017
11
INDIVIDUAL EXPERIMENTATION
Mar-17
Date
Village
Description of experiment
No of
participants
Name of participants
Nov-16
Sedawa, Lepelle,
Oaks, Finala,
Willows, Botshabelo
Diversion ditches, contours (using line levels), trench beds, planting
seeds and seedlings greywater filtration for irrigation,
See attendance registers
Dec-16
Sedawa, lepelle,
Oaks, Finala, Willows
Conservation Agriculture plots : 10mx10m tramline intercropping of
maize and sugar beans and maize and cowpeas. Planted in basins
and rows.
50
See attendance registers
Feb-17
Sedawa, Oaks and
Finala
Liquid manure, shallow trenches
27
See attendance registers
2017/01/31
The Oaks
Diversion ditches, trench beds, CA
4
Mr Makudu, Janet Lewelle,
Florence Lewelle, Betty
Ncgogo,
2017/01/31
Finala
Tower garden, CA, drip kits
27
Sarah Nyathi
2017/02/01
Sedawa
Tunnel: vs normal production experiments
1
Christina
2017/02/01
Lepelle
CA, diversion ditches, trench beds
4 (8)
George Sebatane, Jane
Kobeni, Sias Sebuyane,
Londi Tsilwane
2017/02/06
Sedawa
Basin planting: Control is the normal way 30cmx30cm basins 50cm
apart, Trial is inclusion of manure nad lucerne hay in the basin prior
to planting and mulching between basins
1
Mrs Matene
2017/02/06
Sedawa
Planting a selection of vegetable seeds: Butternut, onion, rosemary,
coriander, chilli, green pepper, squash, lazy house wife (beans),
Swiss chard, chinese cabbage, carrot, okra, parsley, spring onion,
turnip (2 types (white and red), egg plant, tomatoes
19
See Learning and
Innovations report -Sedawa
2017/02/28
Okas, Finala,Sedawa
Mulching CA plots
27
See attendance registers
2017/03/13-
14
Botshabelo, Sedawa
Stone bunds (2), Diversion ditches (2), ridges and furrows (5),
mulching (3) trench beds (5), CA (7), millet and sorghum (5), line
levels (1), seedling beds (5), medicinal plants (1), banana basins (1)
9
See monitoring report; Maria
Malepe, Miriam Malepe,
Dibonanna Mokghoto, Flora
Nthlamo, Meaisy Mokwena,
Mosebu Nthlamo, Rebone
Malepe, Ludia Malepe, Alex
Mogopa.
12
5. Summary of milestone implementation across villages.
MAHLATHINI
MILESTONE COMPLETION: target completion to date % (in black) vs actual (in red)
Key activities /
Milestones
MILESTONE 1
MILESTONE 2
MILESTONE 3
MILESTONE 4
MILESTONE 5
MILESTONE 6
MILESTONE 7
Inception report
100% / 100%
Setting the scene
67% / 65%
100% / 80%
100% / 90%
100% / 100%
Comment:
less coverage,
more villages
visioning + final
LFs outstanding
Some visioning
+ 2 LFs
outstanding
LF selection and training
complete. Additional
visioning in Lepelle
Learning and
mentoring
10% / 15%
30%/ 40%
50%/65%
70%/85%
90%
100%
Comment:
6 villages not 4
6 villages Some
garden mon +
LF outstanding
6 villages;
continuation with
learning schedule;
LFs elected in 3
villages
6 villages; continuation with
learning schedule; soil
fertility and P&d control.
Mentoring and garden
monitoring by LFs
Experimentation &
intro to innovations
25%
25% / 50%
50%/75%
75%/85%
90%
100%
Comment:
for all 6 villages
6 villages not 4
6 villages
For all 6 villages
Collaborative work
Comment:
25%/40%
6 villages:
Introduction to
drip kits and
tunnels; 3 villages
RWH and erosion
control options
50%/65%
6 villages; tunnels, drip kits,
greywater management,
RWH and erosion control
options
75%
100%
Networking and cross
visits
25%/25%
cluster based
workshop in good
farming practices
50%/50%
Open day: cross visit of all
learning groups. World
biodiversity day workshop
75%
100%
Comment:
13
6. Monthly team assessment
Indicators: Assessment March 2017:
Indicator
Overall
target
Actual_Nov
2016
Actual_March
2017
No of participants in learning
groups
100
108
55 (Homestead
assessments, five
fingers w/s and
tunnel w/s)
No of learning groups
5
5
5
No of local facilitators
5
5
Percentage of participants
engaged in CC adaptation
responses
1-2 (45%)
2-3 (25%)
>3 (10-15%)
1-2 (10%)
1-2 (85%)
2-3 (10%)for
this time period
OVERALL:
1-2 (50%)
2-3(15%)
No of participants
experimenting with new
innovations
-local
-co-designed
15
45
5
5
50
No of participants showing
increased knowledge
80
28 (att reg 5
fingers workshop),
22 att reg tunnel
w/s)
Percentage of participants
engaged in collaborative
activities
45%
-
-(25%) building
of tunnel and drip
kit
Percentage of participants with
improved livelihoods
-increased availability of food
-increased income
-increased diversity of
activities and livelihoods
options
40%
5%
5%
-
-
-
-
-
-
Qualitative assessments;
-stakeholder engagement
-Increased understanding and
agency to act towards
increased resilience
-Adaptation and innovations
into local context
-Potential for increased
resilience
-Social engagement
Stories, case
studies,
photos, cluster
activity
records, group
session
minutes,
Stories:
-Making of trench
beds, building
tunnel and drip kit
Oaks, Finale,
Lepelle,
Botashabelo,
Sedawe
-Rainwater
harvesting storage
assessments for
Botshabelo
14
-Mulching of
Conservation
Agriculture plots,
planting cover
crops
-Implementation
of innovations
Understanding:
Examples of people
showing an increased
understanding of CCA
adaptation
Future dated question; explicit vs implicit? What qualifies as
CCA vs good practises?
-Expression of knowledgeand learning in five fingers
workshop (15-16 March) for5 of the 6 villageswas
very impressive. Participants talked about soil and
water conservation, keeping the soil cool with plant
cover and mulching, mixed cropping strategies
conservation agriculture and grey water
management.
Actions:
Examples of people
showing an increased
agency towards increasing
their resilience
-Experience with diversion ditches and trench beds
show individual’s’ learning regarding the importance
of waterand soil conservation strategies. Planting in
the tunnel in Sedawe has clearly shown the
advantages of climate control options
Examples of increased
potential towards
resilience
-Tunnel trench beds, diversion ditches, conservation
agriculture, grey water management and use,….
Project Life Change Questions:
1. Do we have examples or stories of how weor others are in the processof adaptive
management related to CC? (adapt, reflect and respond to….) and examples of
what this adaptive managementis?
2. Do we have stories that show innovation or lack of innovationtowards positive
change? What insights have we gained into how innovation can lead to positive
change?(INCREASED RESILIENCE)
About 50% of participants have tried outsome of the new innovations introduced and
are able to clearly articulate the potential benefits of these practices.
3. Do we have stories that show evidence of, or an interest in self organisation towards
collective action? What insights have we gained into how self organisationcan lead
to collective action?
Requests for meetings by the learning groups within their membership to discuss
local issues have been made as has insistence on a transparent and community
based process forelection of local facilitators.
15
4. Do we have stories to show that learning together is happening or that there is an
interest in learning together? What insights have we gained about how to learn
together?
New individuals join the learning groups throughout the process. Learning groups
have requestedto have meetings among themselves to discuss some of their local
issues. Learning groups have insisted on group meetings to ensure transparency and
accountabilitywithin the group.Election of local facilitators (LFs) is seen as an
important step for the groups who have all taken this process seriously and insisted
on LFs being neutral politically but representative of the group members.
5. Do we have stories of how we and or others are able to think systemically? What
insights have wegained?
Participants arestarting to see the value of and links between the different
innovations introduced-such as diversion ditches, trench beds, mulching, tunnel drip
irrigation and grey watermanagement. Somehave used furrows and ditches as
planting methods within their conservation agriculture trials, as well as mulching and
planting in of a diverse range of crops, including drought tolerant crops such as millet
and sorghum. Others have designed their diversion furrows to feed trench beds. A
few have worked in the tunnel and used grey water and furrows as management
practices within the tunnel. l.
6. Do we have stories of how we and or others are able to be inclusive and democratic?
What insights have we gained about how this can be achieved? (STAKEHOLDER
ENGAGEMENT).
…..
7. Work Plans for the coming two months.
(See the attachedcalendar April2017)
1. Electionand initial training of Local Facilitators for each siteis to becontinued.
They will continue to join the garden assessment and monitoring process, to get
used to the kindsof questions asked of people and gain an understanding of each
individualin their learning group. The garden monitoring form (based on the 5
fingers assessments0 is to be translated into seSotho for easy use byLFs and
Sylvester and Trygive are to provide on the ground mentoring support.
2. Learning will include Soil fertilityfor the villages where this has as yet not been
conducted ( Botshabelo, Willows and Lepelle); looking at nutrients, fertilizers, uses
and combinations of manure, improved kraal manure,compost and liquid manures.
A demonstration of liquid manures will be done as well as how to construct a
shallow trench. Mulching will be prioritised as an important activity for all farmers.
3. Learning will also include: Mixed cropping and natural pest anddisease control;
inter-cropping, multipurpose plants and home-made pest control brews.
4. Garden monitoring will be initiated to assess implementation of new ideas and a
gardening and experimentation plan for eachhouseholderwill be completed. This
will be started in the villages where LF’s arenow present; Sedawe, Botshabelo and
The Oaks.
16
Attachment 1: Detailed upcoming milestone (Milestone 5) activity plans (April-May 2017)
2017
April
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
27
28
29
30
31
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
WRC initiation
WRC initiation
WRC initiation
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
AWARD; Tzaneen
- procurement
plants, seedlings
AWARD: Veg
production training
village 1
AWARD: Veg
production training 2
AWARD: Office,
planning, photos,
reports
AWARD; 1
vehicle
AWARD; 1 vehicle,
refreshments for w/s
AWARD; 1 vehicle,
refreshments for w/s
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
AWARD: team planning
meeting
AWARD; LF training and
cross visit
AWARD: report
writing
consolidation
AWARD: Veg
production training
village 3
AWARD: Veg
production training
village 4
AWARD; 2 vehicles,
refreshments for w/s
AWARD; 1 vehicle,
refreshments for w/s
AWARD; 1 vehicle,
refreshments for w/s
01
02
Notes:
17
2017
May
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
AWARD Training and
monitoring
AWARD Training and
monitoring
AWARD Training
and monitoring
AWARD Training
and monitoring
AWARD: Office and
planning meeting
29
30
31
01
02
03
04
AWARD: Monthly
assessment and planning
AWARD Training and
monitoring
AWARD Training
and monitoring
AWARD Training
and monitoring
AWARD: Office and
planning meeting
05
06
Notes: