Milestone 3 Training and Innovation Report

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RESILIM-O:
Resilience in theLimpopoBasin
Program– Olifants
MILESTONE3:PROGRESS REPORT#2:
December 2016 -January2017
under the
Lower Olifants catchment
Agricultural Support Initiative (AgriSI)
Implemented by
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Table of Contents
Overall Summary .................................................................................................................. 4
Report Contents.................................................................................................................... 5
1.ProgressSummary ........................................................................................................ 5
2.Summaryof baseline and implementation progress per village .................................... 10
3.AgriSI team meeting minutes_2017/01/30, 2017/02/01 ................................................ 12
Monthly assessment ........................................................................................................ 13
Planning: Local facilitator criteria ..................................................................................... 13
Five fingers facilitation.....................................................................................................14
Training: Soil fertility input and demonstrations ................................................................ 14
Individual interviews ........................................................................................................ 15
Media and communications ............................................................................................. 15
Discussionon climate change adaptation (CCA) criteria and monitoring process ............ 16
4.Monthly team assessment ...........................................................................................18
Indicators: Assessment January 2017: Baseline and Conservation Agriculture...............18
Project Life Change Questions: .......................................................................................19
5.Plans for the coming two months. ................................................................................ 20
Attachment 1: Detailed upcoming milestone (Milestones 3 and 4) activity plans (January-
March 2017) ........................................................................................................................ 22
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4
Overall Summary
In the inception meeting an implementation strategy that would bring all6 communities on
board at the same timeand include some baseline and visioning discussions at community
level as well as some theoretical inputs and practical training, was agreed to. This was done
to accommodate the fact that people are anxious to start agricultural activities now in the
Spring and Summer season and for us as the facilitators to provide a commitment to the
communities to action.
This meant that activities planned under later milestones (particularly Module 3 ‘Introduction
to Innovations & Experimentation’) were brought forward and added to originally planned
activities (Module 1 ‘Setting the Scene’ and Module 2 ‘Learning & Mentoring’); whilst
accommodating 6 villages rather than the initial plan of 4 with 2 being brought on board later.
Thus the project isrunning well ahead in terms of both breadth of coverage and Module 3, at
the expense of Module 1 (baseline was completed under this milestone rather than last
milestone; and visioning & scenarios component still to be completed) and Module 2 (5
fingers training needs further reinforcement). At the same time, the Christmas season
disrupted progress. However, overall, the program is running slightly ahead of plan in terms
of implementation (seeSection 2 below).
Two baselineand learning workshops (3 days/ community) have been completed in all 6
villages (Botshabelo, Sedawe, Willows, Oaks, Finale and Lepelle).
The intended process to augment these baselines through individual/household interviews
and baseline assessments has not yet startedas planned, but will be initiated in February
2017; as will the visioning, planning and development of indicators for each. Given the
difficulties of implementing over the Christmas season and re-starting in the new year- there
has not been enough time for this work.
Five learning groups havebeen established across the 6 targeted villages. The original
intention was to have 1 group per village, however, Oaks and Finale decided to combine
their groups due to lower numbers andthe fact they are close neighbours. Local facilitators
(LFs) have come to the fore in all 5 learning groups. The formalisation of the LF selection
process will continue into February and March 2017.
To date learning for eachof the groupshas consisted of water flowand in field rainwater
harvesting, making and using line levels to measure contours and slope, construction of
diversionfurrows, levelling of planting furrows, greywater bucket filters, constructing trench
beds, soil properties,planting of seedsand seedlings in seedling beds, tower gardens and
ConservationAgriculture for field crops.
New ideas have been introduced through demonstration and implementation workshops:
1 Workshop for Botshabelo, Sedawe and Willows in construction of a 4mx6m shade
cloth structure/tunnel (39 participants).
Learning group workshops for Botshabelo, Willows, Oaks, Lepelle and Finale were
held. Baseline information for dryland cropping was gathered and the five fingers
concepts for assessing adaptation practices were introduced. Conservation
Agriculture and farmer experimentation were introduced for all five areas (50
participants). Bucket drip kits and tower gardens were introducedin Oaks and Finale
(27 participants).
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Participants this period
SEEDS OF LIGHT: Nick Vorono, Trygive Nxumalo
MAHLATHINI: Erna Kruger, Sylvester Selala, Chris Stimie
AWARD: Richard Hatfield, Bigboy Mkhabela,
Report Contents
This report contains the following sections:
1. Progress Summary.
2. Summary of baseline and implementation progress per village.
3. AgriSi team meeting minutes – 2016/11/28-29.
4. Monthly team review summary and assessment of indicators.
This report contains the following Annexes:
1. Work calendar; January - March 2017.
2. Location map and community names.
In addition, the following are relevant support documents held in separate project folders:
a) Baseline Workshop 1 reports; Lepelle (last remaining report; the others were
submitted under the last milestone).
b) Baselineworkshop 2 reports; Botshabelo, Oaks & Finale and Willows (2 remaining
report to be submitted under Milestone 4).
c) Community walks for erosion control and rainwater harvesting storage.
d) Tall crop tunnel demonstration workshop.
e) Proposal for RWH storage support.
1.Progress Summary
A.Progress according to Verifiables
The following table summarises the various required documentation of the Expected
Outcomes under this milestone, and the submission status of each. Progress on each
Expected Outcome can be found in sub-sections B and C below.
Verifiable
Relevant activity set
Status
Location
1. Progress reporton
outcomes and
documentation
including:
General Submitted This Progress Report
1.1 Learning
materials,
photographic
records
Activity Set 2
(Innovations &
Experimentation
Activity Set 3
(Learning &
Mentoring)
Submitted Separate project folders
for (a) learning materials
(b) photos
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1.2 Attendance
registers and
photos
All activity sets Submitted Separate project folder
1.3 Garden monitoring
Activity Set 3
(Learning &
Mentoring)
Submitted Separate project folder
contained within
Homestead Assessment
& Monitoring Forms
1.4 Monthly
assessment
Over-all Submitted Progress Report section
3
1.5 Baseline reports
Activity Set 1
(Setting the
Scene)
Submitted Separate projectReports
folder
1.6 Location map and
names
General Submitted Annex F
1.7 Community maps
Activity Set 1
(Setting the
Scene)
Submitted Within community
BaselineReports
(separate project folder)
B.Progress according to Expected Outcomes
ACTIVITY SET 1: Setting the Scene
Activities
planned
Activities
actual
Expected
Outcomes
%
completion
to date
(target /
actual)
Verification
documentation
Submitted
Setting
the
scene
2 villages
x 3 days
ea
Completed
under
Milestone
2
Baseline
data
100% /
100%
Baseline reportsYes: one
Report per
village
Completed
under
Milestone
2
Community
climate
mapping
(CC time
lines,
current
practices,
local
innovations)
100% /
100%
Community maps
Yes:
contained
within
Baseline
Reports
Learning
groups
established
100% /
100% - Oaks
and Finale
have been
combined
into one
learning
group and
Botshabelo
and Sedawe
have been
separated
into two – so
5 in total
Attendance
registers
Yes
7
Local
facilitators
process
100% / 25%
- process
agreed with
groups,
criteria and
selection still
to be
finalised
Attendance
registers
Remaining report for Baseline Round 1 (Lepelle, 2 days/village) completed - Report
attached.
Round 2 (1 day) baseline workshops conducted in Botshabelo, Willows, Oaks &
Finale and Lepelle - Reports attached, one each per village.
Under the Round 2 baseline workshops we considered current practices in dryland
farming. Most communities no longer practicedryland farming in their larger fields, but
only in their homestead plots. They have a general practice of ploughing andthen
planting in maizeseed by hand. Other crops include jugo beans, beans, butternuts,
morogo etc. A few areas can irrigate these crops.
Attendance: Botshabelo (24), Willows (26), Oaks (10), Finale (24), Lepelle (24)See
Attendance Registers.
ACTIVITY SET 2: Introduction to Innovations & Experimentation
Activities
planned
Activities
actual
Expected
Outcomes
% completion
to date (target
/ actual)
Verification
documenta
tion
Submitted
Introduc-
tion
to
innovation
and
experimen-
tation
4 villages
x 3 days
ea
5 villages
x 1 day ea
+3 villages
x 1day ea
Understand
current
practices,
introduce
new
options,
practice with
new options
100% / 110%
(Tunnel, bucket
drip kits, to be
continued under
Milestone 4 + a
rain water
harvesting
component has
been added)
Learning
materials
Learning
Materials:
Yes
includes
Training
Manual.
Registers:
Yes
Photos: Yes
Attendance
registers
Photographic
records
Tall crop tunnel demonstration and construction workshop (shade-cloth structure of
4mx5m) for Botshabelo, Sedawe and Willows- Report attached.
Demonstration of new ideas in the form of community basedworkshops for bucket
drip kits for greywater use and efficient irrigation andtower gardens for intensive
production of vegetables ina smallspace using greywater – See Training Materials.
Household visits were conducted to complete the HomesteadAssessment &
Monitoring Forms and discuss implementation and progress with individual farmers.
This includes assessment of current experimentationby thehouseholder. 12 of these
were conducted across 4 communities – See Homestead Assessment &
Monitoring Forms.
f) Initial assessments for potential for underground RWHstorage structures at
household level (team workshop with Kevin Mitchell and Chris Stimie);2 x household
assessments in Sedawe and Willows respectively. One householder Salphina
Moongaale from Boshabelo has volunteered to have a tank ather homestead. She
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has offered to source inputs and build thetank as long as the team assists with the
technical design aspects – See Annex E Proposal for RWH storage support.
ACTIVITY SET 3: Learning and Mentoring
Activities
planned
Activities
actual
Expected
Outcomes
% completion
to date
(target /
actual)
Verification
documentation
Submitted
Learning
and
mentoring
4 villages
x 3 days
ea
6 villages
x 2 days
ea
New practice
training:
Conservation
Agriculture
techniques;
farmer
experimentation
100%/ 85%
farmer
Experimentation
still to be
coherently
introduced in
Lepelle. CA
introduced in all
villages. Further
training under
milestone 4.
Learning
materials
Yes:
includes
learning
material &
training
manual
Attendance
registers
Yes
Photos Yes
Garden
monitoring
Yes:
Homestead
assessment
forms
(Oaks (3),
Lepelle (7),
Finale (1),
Sedawe (1)
Farmer
monitoring
initiated
50% / 45% -
Homestead
assessment
forms (Oaks (3),
Lepelle (7),
Finale (1),
Sedawe (1)
N/A
Further input, discussion and learning on dryland cropping practices, as follow-up
from the Round 2 baselines discussion on practices. Past, present and changes have
been made due to more extreme weather patterns. These include:
Dryland cropping only in backyard plots where potential for some irrigation is
possible. Ploughing and then planting seed by hand afterwards to ensure better
germination
Re-planting of seed later if germination is poor using broadcasting and a branch to
cover seeds.
Either not planting traditional crops such as millet and sorghum anymore(in some
areas- due to bird damage), or focusing on thesecrops (finger millet, pearl millet
and sorghum) in the back yard plots as these are much more drought tolerant
than maize.
Planting and irrigating maize in the fields in preference to the more traditional
sorghum and millet as even theseare not drought tolerant enough - and are
susceptible to birddamage.
Planting seed without addition of fertilizer as it is expensive or manure - as it is
becoming scarcer and people are now charging for it.
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Keeping seed for planting.
Community walks for assessment of erosion control and rain water harvesting storage
needs and options – Sedawe and Willows - Report attached.
Household visits were conducted to pilot the Homestead Assessment & Monitoring
Forms and discuss implementation and progress with individual farmers. This
includes doing a garden drawing with planning for further actions by the householder.
12 of these were conducted across 4 communities – See Homestead Assessment &
Monitoring Forms. .
We also introduced the concept of the Five Fingers framework to assess land use and
good practices with regard to Climate change, water management, soil erosion, soil
health and crop management – See Training Materials.
MISCELLANEOUS ACTIVITIES
Collaborative activities
Started initial assessments and “walkabouts” with community members in Sedawe
and Willows to check on erosion issues impacting on households (2 days).
Networking
K2C coordinator contacted for joint activities (individual household interviews,
collaborative activities around erosion control)
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C.Summary of baseline and implementation progress per village
VILLAGE
Current
practices
CC mapping
Visioning
and
scenarios
Champions/
Local
facilitators
New
practice
training
Farmer
experiment
ation
Individual farm
experiment
designs
Tunnel
construction
Drip kit
construction
RWH and erosion
control
assessments
FiveFingers
Vision and
scenarios
Selection
Training
Contours
Diversion
ditches,
trench beds
greywater
bucket filter
Keyhole
beds
Tower
gardens
Soil
properties
Soil fertility (manure,
compost liquid manure,
fertilizers)
Planting
seed and
seedlings
CA
Sedawe
√√√√√√√√ √
Botshabelo
√√√√√√√√ √
Willows
√√√√√√√√√ √√
Oaks
√√√√√√ √√√√√√
Finale
√√√√√√ √√√√√√
Lepelle
√√ √ √ √√√ √√
Introductiontoinnovationsandexperimentation
Learningand mentoring
Baseline
AWARDbaseline and implementation pervillage:2016-2017
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MAHLATHINI MILESTONE COMPLETION: target completion to date % (in black) vs actual (in red)
Key activities /
Milestones MILESTONE 1 MILESTONE 2 MILESTONE 3 MILESTONE 4 MILESTONE 5 MILESTONE 6 MILESTONE 7
Inception report
100% /
100%
Setting the scene
67% /
65%
100% /
80%
Comment:
less coverage,
more villages
visioning + final
LFs outstanding
Learning and
mentoring
10% /
15%
30% /
40%
50%
70%
90%
100%
Comment:
6 villages not 4
6 villages not 4.
Some garden
mon + LF ment
outstanding
Experimentation &
introduction to
innovations
25%
25% /
50%
50%
75%
90%
100%
Comment:
brought
forward for all 6
villages
6 villages not 4
Collaborative work
25%
50%
75%
100%
Comment:
Networking and cross
visits
25%
50%
75%
100%
Comment:
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2.AgriSI team meeting minutes_2017/01/30, 2017/02/01
Two sessions were held;one for review and planning with team members and one including
other AWARD team members to engage in a discussion around CCA criteria and
implementation.
AGENDA -2017/01/30
oMonthly assessment form for December 2016 – January 2017
oPlanning next round of workshops
Local facilitators- criteria, election
Five fingers- discuss themes, decide on good practices jointly under
each theme and think through ways to monitor (what, how, who)
Training input - Soil fertility
oMedia and communications- session with Fidelus
oIndividual baseline interviews- pilot and plan process
oHousehold visits for CA implementation from December training, as wellas
RWH harvesting assessment in one or twomore villages
oCCA workshop - Wed 1 February
Summary action items
BB, Trygive: DKAvisit to Botshabelo and Sedawe (and include Trygive- either
a visit and or to talk about his tank and RWH implementation
BB: Living Land interviews in Botshabelo, Willows
BB, Sylvester: Consolidate all attendance registers and photos by 10 Feb
BB, Sylvester: LM involvement – Phone LED person re a field visit and or
meeting – liaise with Tebogo. Liaise with Silus form Limato find out their LM
involvement and how AWARD and Lima could work together on this
Monthly assessment form continuation Friday 10 February
Sylvester: Get an SD card for the AWARD camera
Sylvester to consolidate photos on the last day of each trip
Trygiveto send pictures through Whatsapp to Erna
BB, Sylvester: Tweet a few good photos to Fidelus on last Friday of the
session for # Our Olifants
Sylvester; to contact Lyndseyjones rom K2C re her app for mapping areas and
participants using Google Maps
ACTION: BB, Sylvester to finalise translation of five finger summaryand hand
into SiPedi for distribution at the workshops. Copy up
Sylvester: Preparation for trainings:
oGet 6x50kg bags of manure for each training workshop
oFind bales of grassand or Lucerne for the training workshops
oBuy Lucerneseed
oCheck on availability of horse manure
oSet up for Mid March- trees- Moringa, banana circles _order banana
seedlings for pick up in Tzaneen
Richard: to send Taryn and team the Milestone and baseline reports for Lower
Olifants
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Taryn; review these reports and provide feedback to the team re dealing with
CCA reporting in monthly reports and assessments
Taryn and team to join one of the visioning and Five fingers workshops to
provide support in facilitation
Sylvester to connect with Hugo re water quality information and what can be
gleaned for communitylevel information provision
Monthly assessment
We started on this form, but found that some more thought was needed for the indicator
percentages. It was decided to postpone this discussion to 10 February.
Photos on drop boxhas not really worked – AWARD staff are not familiar with it. It was
decided to change this process to the following:
a. The photos will be organised into folders accordingto area and date and will
be copied to be available on two laptops (Erna and Sylvester)
b. Still need to find a way to put captions on specific photographs of interest.
Having to put captions on allthe photos is an activity that is presently too time
consuming. The suggestion is to set up a gallery for each roundof the
intervention and send this around to field staff to add specific captions
c. Photos that need to be taken include: whenworkshops and learning sessions
are being held, for household interviews and visits and innovations people are
trying (local and project based. The latter still needs to be given some
attention.
d. Good photos can be put aside to be tweeted to Fidelus for the #Our Olifant’s
site
Lyndsey Jones works with K2C contracts into the Bioshpere project. She works with a real-
time app in terms of mapping places of implementation – working through Google maps. It
could be a good idea for us to findout what this entails and whether we can work with this
app as well.
Ground Truth have developed an app that mapsriver health interventions. It was labour and
resource intensive to set up. We donot havethe resources under this project to allow for
something like that.
Planning: Local facilitator criteria
The local facilitator (LF) is the local support person who visits all farmers, monitors their
implementation (fills in the garden monitoring forms) and helps them with trying out some of
the new ideas – providing support for implementation. They alsoprovide a linkage point for
AWARD and Mahlathini to interact with the learning group. They will support the individual
interview baseline process.
They volunteer and are nominated by community members and are chosen to fulfil the
criteria. This is not a formal election process with voting as suchbut rather broad agreement
from the learning group members present on the day of selection. Their appointment is
performance based, meaning that they will fill in timesheets and are provided a stipend that
covers their time and expenses (transport, refreshments etc.) for their working days. It is a
part time position and not a “job”.
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Selection Criteria:
Active farmers
Literate (preferably in English)
Well known and liked inthe community
Prepared to share information and assist others
Not shy
No overt political agendas
Local and well settled
Attendance of all training– interested inlearning and experimentation
Five fingers facilitation
For our AgriSi programme we will use the following Five Fingers Framework. It has been
slightly adapted fromthe version used previouslyfor wetland management interventions
within AWARD.
Water management (Water conservation, infiltration, rainwater harvesting)
Soil management (soil erosion control soil conservation, soil fertility, soil health)
Crop management (diversity, crop mixes and varieties, growth, natural pest and
disease control)
Natural diversity (trees, multipurpose plants)
Livestock (integration, fodder and grazing management)
Hand/palmWorking together (collaboration, local action, self-organisation)
The visioning and Five Finger discussion in community is to follow the following facilitation
process:
Discuss a broad based vision for improved natural resource management and
farming in the community – what would people like to see and be able to do.
Discuss resources and practices that could lead to the outcomes proposed in the
vision.
Introduce our five finger andhand idea as a way to analyse the situation and
implementation
Elicit ideas from learning groups as to what would be good practice under each from
their own experience and some of the innovations introduced already, augmented by
discussions and ideas added by facilitation team
Then discuss activities for each of the good practices
And finallyadd ways to monitor progress- (traffic light idea)
Training: Soil fertility input and demonstrations
The training content for thissession is to include the following topics and discussions:
Input on soil nutrients; include the macro-nutrients ie N,P,K and briefly talk about
micro-nutrients. Use of fertilizers (emphasise this is not a whole food, just nutrients
for plants to grow). Further emphasise that fertilizers are ineffective in hot dry
weather as they need rain to be washed into the rooting zone for uptake. They can
also be washed out in heavy rain – so there is cost but not guarantee.
Manure; types and improved manure (composted manure), compost, green manures
and agroforestry
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Liquid manures; animal, plant, foliar spray, improved liquid manure (with sugar, milk,
lime, bone meal)
Shallow trenches- demonstration -as an ‘improvedpractice” under furrow planting
Individual interviews
The homesteadassessment form was piloted in Finale on Tuesday 31 January. Overallthe
questionnaire works well, but enumerators need to understand the intervention to write
meaningful comments in the comments column. It is possible to unbundle the questionnaire
a bit as some questions are a bit dense
Schedule for individualinterviews
Date Place Interviewers No
2017/02/07 Sedawe Sylvester, BB,
Trygive, Intern,
Local facilitator (LF)
10
2017/02/09 Willows Sylvester, BB,
Trygive, Intern, LF
10
2017/02/15 Botshabelo Trygive, BB, Intern
LF
8
2017/02/16 Sedawe Trygive, BB, Intern
LF
8
2017/02/17 Willows Interns x 2, Richard,
LF
6
2017/03/01 Finale Trygive, BB, Interns
x 2, LF
10
2017/03/02 Oaks Trygive, BB, Interns
x 2, LF
10
2017/03/03 Willows or Sedawe
or Botshabelo
Richard, internsx 2,
LF
8
2017/03/08 Lepelle Trygive, BB, Interns
x 2, LF
10
2017/03/09 Lepelle Trygive, BB, Interns
x 2, LF
10
2017/03/10 Finalisation of
outstanding
interviews- Oaks,
Finale
Richard, internsx 2,
LF
8
Media and communications
A short meeting with Fidelus was held. Here it was discussed that each sub grant would
need to provide information for development of a profile and brochure as well as a 1-3min
explainer video. The media team will communicate their needs in due time.
We were requested to provide regular descriptive photos to tweet #Our Olifants, by emailing
what we wouldlike to put in to Fidelus – a picture with a caption.
It was suggested that if events are being held the media and communications team could do
press releases.
16
Fidelus then discussed the programming and interview schedule for the Living Land TV
episode showcasing AWARD’s work and also another session for People’s Weather. Here
interviews would focus on CC impacts on smallholder farmers.
Discussion on climate change adaptation (CCA) criteria and monitoring process
1st February 2017
AGENDA:
Theme: Climate change adaptation (CCA) criteria
oWhat is considered CCA and what isn't?
oIPCC definition? Literature? AWARD’s definition?
oWhat kind of criteria are, or could be used?
Theme: Climate Change Dialogues as an approach
oHow will KRA4team engage with Richard and Mahlathini? What role each
would play?
oHow does Climate Change Dialogues work?
oHow would Climate Change Dialogues integrate with the Mahlathini’s
workplan?
oWhat is the latest understanding of Mahlathini’s workplan for 2017? (This
includes a summary of work that has been done that is relevant for discussion
on CCA and Climate Change Dialogues.
Theme: Climate change impacts and the five-finger framework
oWhat do we know about the potential CCimpacts are for each element of the
five-finger framework?
1. Water conservation
2. Soil management
3. Soil health
4. Crop types
5. Maintaining indigenous plants
What CCA options may Mahlathini support with regards to these potential
impacts?
What support would Mahlathini need from the KRA4 team for these CCA
options?
Monitoring framework; What MERL process would Mahlathini need to follow?
Climate change adaptation criteria: Definitions
Transformation is a change in the fundamental attributes of a system, often based on altered
paradigms, goals or values. Transformation can occur in technological or biological systems,
financial structures, and regularity, legislativeor administrative regimes.
A coping mechanism is the use of available skills, resources and opportunities to address,
manage and overcome adverse conditions with the aim of achieving basic functioning of
people, institutions,organisations and systems in the short and medium term.
Comment: In terms of AgriSI, there is not much chance in the short term to be working in the
transformative realm. In many ways we are not yet even“coping”. So the aim would be to
work towards something in between coping and transformation.
17
IPCC USAID AgriSI
Adaptation is the process of
adjustment to actual or
expected climate andits
effects. In human systems
adaptation seeks to
moderate harm or exploit
beneficial opportunities. In
natural systems human
intervention may facilitate
adjustment to expected
climate effects
.. Increasing the resilience
of people, places and
livelihoods to the impacts of
climate change through
improved access to
information, planning and
action
Community members have
a conception of what climate
change is and some people
will follow specific practices
to deal with this. If the
person is consciously doing
something and changing
their practice to deal with
the issues of climate change
then it is considered an
adaptation.
It is possible for a local
practice to follow some
aspects of CCA and some
good practices andlocal
innovations could have
elements embedded that
are a good climate change
response. This canbe
explored to become a
conscious change process.
Discussions initiallycentred arounda potential definition appropriate for the AgriSI team.
There was some questionas to the need to suggest that CCA had to be a conscious
intervention by the farmer to be counted as adaptation. As there are already a number of
examples of Climate change adaptation responses; both negative and positive, in the
villages, it was argued that these need to be included, considered and worked with.
Adaptation does notneed to be pro-active – adaptation as evolution. That would fit into the
idea of supporting local innovations.
It was stressed that with the process of participatory innovation development a systemic
view is possible as well as inclusion of experimentation withCCA responses andideas to
increase knowledge, understanding and collective action. A potential drawback of using this
methodology for CCA adaptation is that the acceptance of innovations at community level
imply a “wow” effect. Thesuggested alternatives need to have an immediate beneficial effect
to be considered animprovement over what is presently being done. It is accepted however
that a number of natural resource management erosion control and soil health improvement
practices may take some time to show positive outcomes
PROMPTS:
Increased temperature
Rainfall events are more extreme (drought, flooding, storms, hail etc.)
Look at combinations of practices to arrive at sustainability through different configurations.
Sub grants are to identifyad hoc needs for specialist inputs, which can be provided; for
example, new crop options and rainwater harvesting. 3-4 CCA workshops will be held for
each of the sub grants per year. This will include some assistance and support in facilitation
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training and how to facilitate CC dialogues. It will also consider learning about CC impacts,
technical aspects planning and institutions.
Monthly reports are important to draw together key discussions that have shaped CCA.
3.Monthly team assessment
Indicators: Assessment January 2017: Baseline and Conservation Agriculture
Indicator
Overall
target
Actual_Nov
2016
Actual_Jan
2017
No of participants in learning
groups
100 108 50
No of learning groups 5 5 5
No of local facilitators5
Percentage of participants
engaged in CC adaptation
responses
1-2 (45%)
2-3 (25%)
>3 (10-15%)
1-2 (10%) 1-2 (85%) – for
this time period
OVERALL:
1-2 (25%)
2-3(10%)
No of participants
experimenting with new
innovations
-local
-co-designed
15
45
5
5
21
No of participants showing
increased knowledge
80 10
Percentage of participants
engaged in collaborative
activities
45% - -(5%) – joint
planting activities
Percentage of participants with
improved livelihoods
-increased availability of food
-increased income
-increased diversity of
activities and livelihoods
options
40%
5%
5%
-
-
-
-
-
-
Qualitative assessments;
-stakeholder engagement
-Increased understanding and
agency to act towards
increased resilience
- Adaptation and innovations
into local context
-Potential for increased
resilience
-Social engagement
Stories, case
studies, photo
diaries,
collaborative
work catalogue
Stories:
-Building of a Tall
Crop Tunnel in
Sedawe
-Erosion control
and rainwater
harvesting storage
assessments for
Sedawe and
Willows
- Rain Water
Harvesting
proposal for
19
piloting
implementation
through DKA
U
nderstanding
:
Examples of people
showing an increased
understanding of CCA
adaptation
Future dated question; explicit vs implicit? What qualifies as
CCA vs good practises?
Actions
:
Examples of people
showing an increased
agency towards increasing
their resilience
Examples of increased
potential towards
resilience
Project Life Change Questions:
1. Do we have examples or stories of how we or others are in the process of adaptive
management related to CC? (adapt, reflect and respond to….) and examples of
what this adaptive management is?
Some of the introduced innovations are also being worked with through other
stakeholders.
Drip irrigation: in the Oaks and Willows the DoA have provided drip irrigation
to the cooperatives in the area. So there are a few people already
knowledgeable on this
Erosion control: K2C is working with partners and CWP to implementerosion
control along road verges andsome of the dongas and badly eroded fields in
Willows for example.
Soil sampling: Has been undertaken by the university of Limpopo – but this
has caused someconfusion as they have not come with the results but with
suggestions as to what people should plant. There is a private laboratory in
Tzaneen where we cantake soil samples to work with a more conscious
learning process around reading results and increasing soil fertility.
Local innovations in field cropping include;
Planting seed by handafter ploughing to ensure that seed is not planted too
deep. Community members have noticed that planting with conventional
planters places the seed too deep in the soil and they do not germinate.
Replanting when seed does not germinate by broadcasting and then allowing
cattle to trample the seed into the ground.
ConservationAgriculture has been introduced. We have focused on organic versions
of the system with basin planting for water conservation, as well as intercropping with
beans and cowpeas. In addition bird resistant sorghum and millet has been provided
20
for people to tryout. Cover crops will also be introduced to look a extending soil
cover and providing fodder sources of livestock
2. Do we have stories that show innovation or lack of innovation towards positive
change? What insights have we gained into how innovation can lead to positive
change?(INCREASED RESILIENCE)
Continued exploration of community based water provision systems is underway:
Lepelle has a canal bringing water from the stream (perennial) which provides both
household and agricultural water to around 60 households in the village. There is a
local management process inplace for this system.
3. Do we have stories that show evidence of, or an interest in self organisation towards
collective action? Whatinsights have we gained into how self organisation can lead
to collective action?
Generally self organisation is very low – mostly with water management and
provision each person must sort themselves out. A few individuals in the community
may show initiative to transport and ‘sell” water for example or lay pipes that others
may haveaccess to at a price. This is accepted as a practice.
Boreholes are personal resources- there is little understanding the boreholes tap
underground water and what the effect of this could be. Ground water recharge is not
known or considered.
People do not really practice good water management once they do have access.
For some of thecommunity based systems each pipe is open ended- water flows
continuallyand there are no valves or taps to regulate flow(Lepelle and Sedawe). In
the Oaks where municipal taps are available hose pipes are left to run for the entire
period when water is available. People have access for 3-4 days every week or two.
4. Do we have stories to show that learning together is happening or that there is an
interest in learning together? What insights have we gained about how to learn
together?
The learning groups havebeen accepted in the villages and in all cases other
interested individuals have been allowed to join.
5. Do we have stories ofhow we and or others are able to think systemically? What
insights have wegained?
Baseline: little evidence- Participants are focussed on their day to day needs and
survival.
6. Do we have stories ofhow we and or others are able to beinclusive and democratic?
What insights have we gained about how this can be achieved? (STAKEHOLDER
ENGAGEMENT).
4.Plans for the coming two months.
(See the attached calendar January- March 2017)
21
1. Run the demonstration workshops for buildingof a shade cloth tunnel and drip kits
for Lepelle, Oaks & Finale at a pre-selected site in Oaks -choosing a site to be a
good demonstration within the community, that is easily accessible, where people
could work together and where the ‘ownership’ of the tunnel would not be in
question.
2. Run the 3rdd day for the baseline workshops in all five sites:Now chosen as
Botshabelo, Sedawe, Oaks +Finale, Willows and Lepelle. Content will be Visioning
and ‘Five finger’ discussions and choice of indicators for each group
3. Election and initial training of Local Facilitators for each site. They will join the
homestead based assessments- individual interviews, to get used to the kinds of
questions asked of people and gain an understanding of each individual in their
learning group. The idea is not that they do the interviewing as the questionnaire is
a little too complicated.
4. Learning willincludeSoil fertility; looking at nutrients, fertilizers, uses and
combinations of manure, improved kraal manure, compost and liquid manures. A
demonstration of liquid manureswill be done as well as how to construct a shallow
trench. Mulching will be prioritised as an important activity for all farmers.
5. Garden monitoring will be initiated to assess implementation of new ideas and a
gardening and experimentation plan for each householder
22
Attachment 1: Detailed upcoming milestone (Milestones 3 and 4) activity plans (January-March 2017)
2017 January
MONDAYTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY SUNDAY
262728293031 01
020304050607 08
091011121314 15
161718192021 22
232425262728 29
30 31
AWARD TEAMPLANNING
MEETING AM: Erna,Richard,
Sylvester, BB, SOL; INDIVIDUAL
INTERVIEW Set up:PM
AWARD Individual interivews
pilot- Botshabelo(Erna,BB,
Trygive, Sylvester +++++
AWARD vehicles:1x double cab -
Notes:
We may need a venue for Wednesday's CCA workshopif the meeting room at AWARDis notavaialble.
23
2017 February
MONDAYTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY SUNDAY
30 3101020304 05
Individualinterivews:Oaks nad
Finale: Erna, BB,Sylvester
AWARDOFFICE: CCA
criteria andmodels
workshop: Richard, BB,
Sylvester,SOL, Taryn
Kong ,+++(LMreps?)
Individual interivews nad
community asedwater
schemeexploration:
Lepelle: Erna,Trygive,
Sylvers,BB
Adimandpreparation.
Planning meeintgs;
Erna,Richard,
Sylvester,BB
AWARDvehicles:1x
double cab - Combining
ofgroups fortraining
.Catering
AWRDvehicles:1x
double cab -
060708091011 12
AWARD: COMMUNITY w/s - LF
criteria, Fivefingers, garden
training: Botshabelo .
Sylvester, BB, Trygive
AWARDIndividualinterviews-
Botshabelo. Sylvester, BB,
Trygive
AWARD: COMMUNITY
w/s - LF criteria, Five
fingers, garden training:
Willows. Sylvester, BB
AWARDIndividaul
interviews-Willows.
Sylvester, BB
Report writing and
consolidation.MONTHL
Y REVIEW SESSION:
Sylvester, BB,Trygive,
Richard
AWARDvehicles:1x double
cab - Combining of groups for
training .Catering
AWRD vehicles: 1x doublecab - AWARD vehicles: 1x
double cab-Combining
of groups fortraining
.Catering
AWARDvehicles:1x
double cab - Combining
ofgroups fortraining
.Catering
131415161718 19
202122232425 26
27 2801020304 05
06 07
Notes:
24
2017 March
MONDAYTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY SUNDAY
27 2801020304 05
060708091011 12
131415161718 19
Office: Preparation and admin; Sylvester, BB
Finalisation fo individula
interviews, Soil fertility training,
check on drip kit construction;
Sylvester, BB
AWARD: COMMUNITY
w/s - 3 villages: CCA and
5 fingers -Sharon,Erna,
Sylvester, BB, Trygive,
Nick
AWARD: COMMUNITY
w/s - 3 villages: CCA and
5 fingers - Sharon, Erna,
Sylvester, BB, Trygive,
Nick
AWARD: Planning, for 2nd round
of Tunnels anddrip
irrigation;Erna,Sylvester, BB,
Trygive,Nick
AWARDvehicles: 1x double cab -
AWARDvehicles: 2 x
doublecabs -
Combining of groups for
training .Catering
AWARDvehicles: 2 x
double cabs - Combining
of groups for training
.Catering
AWARDvehicles: 1x double cab -
Combining of groups for training
.Catering
202122232425 26
RWH assessments (Chris, Erna,
Sylvester,BB
2nd Tunnelconstruction
workshop; Chris,Erna,
Sylvester, BB, Trygive, Nick
RWH assessments (Chris,
Erna, Sylvester, BB
drip kit construction
workshop ; Chris,
Sylvester, BB, Trygive,
Nick
AWARD; Officeadmin, reporting,
monthly assessment
AWARDvehicles: 1x double
cab - Combining of groups for
training .Catering
AWARDvehicles: 1x double cab -
AWARDvehicles: 1x
doublecab - Combining
of groups for training
.Catering
AWARDvehicles: 1x
double cab -
272829 303101 02
03 04
Notes: