Milestone 2 Progress Report

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RESILIM-O:
Resilience intheLimpopo Basin
ProgramOlifants
MILESTONE 2: PROGRESSREPORT#1:
October-November2016
under the
Lower Olifants catchment
Agricultural Support Initiative (AgriSI)
Implemented by
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Table of Contents
1. PROGRESS .................................................................................................................. 5
October-November 2016: Progress according to deliverables........................................... 5
Success stories (positives)................................................................................................ 7
What is Community level climate change adaptation..................................................... 7
Some issues……........................................................................................................... 8
Miriam Marepe (Mabins B)local innovations................................................................ 8
Tsietsi Nkwana (Lepelle) Local Innovations................................................................ 9
Plans for the coming month............................................................................................. 10
2. AGRISI TEAM MEETING MINUTES; November 2016................................................. 11
Agenda -2016/11/28-29 ............................................................................................... 11
Progress and planning..................................................................................................... 11
Individual interviews..................................................................................................... 11
Baseline and learning workshops................................................................................. 12
Local facilitators........................................................................................................... 12
Baselines, Visioning and learning.................................................................................... 12
3. TEAM ASSESSMENT.................................................................................................. 13
Implementation suggestions re homesteads to demonstrate improved infrastructure...... 13
Individual baseline assessments planning....................................................................... 13
Field process review........................................................................................................ 13
Miscellaneous action points............................................................................................. 14
Indicators: Assessment November 2016......................................................................... 14
Project Life Change Questions:....................................................................................... 15
Attachment 1: Detailed upcoming milestone detailed activity plans (Nov-Dec 2016).......... 17
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Outline
In the inception meeting an implementation strategy that would bring all 6 communities on
board at the same time and include some baseline and visioning discussions at community
level as well as some theoretical inputs and practical training, was agreed to. This was done
to accommodate for the fact that people are anxious to start agricultural activities now in the
Spring and Summer season and for us as the facilitators to provide a commitment to the
communities to action.
Thus, the first baseline and learning workshops of 2 days/ community for Mabins A, B,
Sedawe, Willows, Oaks, Finale and Lepelle were held. Reports have been writtenfor each
community. Once this process has been finalised in February 2017 a consolidated baseline
report for all 6 communities will be produced.
The intended process of individual/household interviews and baseline assessments has not
yet started as planned, but will be initiated early in the new year; as will the visioning,
planning and development of indicators for each group.
To date learning for each of the groups has consisted of water flow and in field rainwater
harvesting, making and using line levels to measure contours and slope, construction of
diversion furrows, levelling of planting furrows, greywater bucket filters, constructing trench
beds, soil properties and planting of seeds and seedlings in seedling beds.
A combined demonstrationworkshop is being planned for 3 of the 6 groups in construction
of a 4mx6m shade cloth structure/tunnel as well as a learning session in construction of a
bucket drip kit and also management of greywater.
Participants
SEEDS OF LIGHT: Nick Vorono, Trygive Nxumalo
MAHLATHINI: Erna Kruger, Sylvester Selala
AWARD: Richard Hatfield, BigboyMkhabela, Kevin Pollard
Contents
This report contains the following sections:
1. Progress
2. AgriSi team meeting minutes 2016/11/28-29
3. Monthly team review summary and assessment of indicators
This report contains the following attachments:
1. Work calendar; November 2016-February 2017
And annexures:
Baseline reports; Mabins+Sedawe, Willows, Finale and Oaks.
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1. PROGRESS
October-November 2016: Progress according to deliverables
1. Setting the scene
Activities
planned
Activities
actual
Outputs
% completion
Verification
4 villages x
3 days ea
6 villages x
2 day ea
Baseline data
50%
Baseline
reports (per
community)
Community
climate
mapping
100% (CC time lines,
current practices, local
innovations)
Learning groups
established
65% -decision re
formalisation still
outstanding
Attendance
registers
Local facilitators
process
25% -discussed with
groups, criteria to be
finalised
Attendance
registers
Visioning and
scenario
development
25% -group process
outstanding practices
discussed and
suggestions for
innovations made by
groups
Baseline
reports
Round 1 (2 days) of group baselines conducted in Mabins, A, B, Sedawe,
Willows, Oaks, Finale and Lepelle (2 days/village).-Five baseline reports
attached (Mabins, Willows, Finale)
Attendance: Mabins,a,B sedawe (24), Willows (26), Oaks (10), Finale (24),
Lepelle (24) -Attendance registers in a file with BB
Understanding of CC in communities explored as well as community
responses and issues in the face of this. We considered past, present and
future land use practices and changes in resources and availability. We
prioritized issues in the community. Generally the community level
understanding of Climate change is a lot deeper than we may have expected.
There are already indications of adaptations and local innovations responding
to the changes people are facing. Community members are somewhat bleak
about the future if current trends of drought, heat and resource depletion
continue. They do not feel they will be able to survive in the villages where
they live now and know that there is not much in the line of work opportunities
in towns.
Current practices and local innovations were explored. Interesting practices
and innovations included for example, planting and irrigation furrows, planting
basins for bananas, which include a rain water harvesting system, irrigated
fodder production for goats.
AgriSI programme introduced; household experimentation demonstration of
CC technologies (small dams/ tanks, shade cloth tunnels and micro drip kits)
and collaborative activities for the learning groups (which could include
erosion control layout and planning of yards for RWH, ….)
2. Learning and mentoring
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Activities
planned
Activities
actual
Outputs
% completion
Verification
4 villages x
3 days ea
6 villages x
2days ea
New practice
training
25% -still to do
greywater, garden layout
and design, organic
gardening, nutrition, fruit
production and
conservation agriculture
Training
manuals,
attendance
registers,
photos, farmer
work plans,
garden
monitoring
Local facilitators
training and
mentoring
No yet chosen
Input and discussionson water flow and in field rainwater harvesting,
principles of water management (start at the top, slow it down, spread it out,
sink it in,…)
Practicals 1. Measuring contours and slope using line levels. Household
assessment of water flow and options of using RWH, constructing a diversion
ditch to lead rainwater to the garden, doing a cut off drain at the top of the
garden,
Practicals-2. constructing a trench bed. Planting seed and seedlings and
mulching.
Demonstration: bucket greywater filtration system for cleaning water for
irrigation. This same bucket filtration system is used for the propose drip
irrigation kits to be used with greywater.
3. Experimentation and introduction to innovations
Initial discussion held around potential innovations that people would like to
have introduced in their areas; included grey water management and use,
cleaning of water, water storage options, small dams, shade cloth structures,
drip irrigation, introduction of new crops, planting trees to reduceheat,
different methods of watering, mechanical pumps (hand and foot pumps) to et
borehole water to the garden, beekeeping, agroforestry etc -that can deal
with issues
Initial assessments for potential for underground RWH storage structures at
householdlevel (team workshop with Kevin Pollard and Chris Stimie); 2 x
household assessments in Sedawe and Willows respectively. One
householder Salphina Moongaale from Mabins B has volunteered to have a
tank at her homestead. She has offered to source inputs andbuild the tank as
long as the team assists with the technical design aspects.
4. Collaborative activities
Started initial assessments and “walkabouts” with community members in
Sedawe and Willows to check on erosion issues impacting on households ( 2
days)
5. Networking
K2C coordinator contacted for join activities (individual household interviews,
collaborative activities around erosion control)
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Success stories (positives)
Climate Change Adaptation debate:the team has come across many interesting
examples ofcommunity members adapting to their changing environment in a more or less
conscious way. This has led us to want to consider in more detail aspects of innovation and
adaptation and whether there is a difference.
To start we have defined the processes as follows with some examples:
What is Community level climate change adaptation
Discussed terms used in the field:
Current practice: this is a practice or activity that most people in a locality are doing.
Examples in ORB:
oPlanting furrows for furrow irrigation
oIrrigation basins for fruit trees such as mangoes and bananas
Good practice:this is a practice from a locality or elsewhere that is considered to be
positive in that context in terms of criteria that include sustainability and improvement
in environmental, agro-ecological, social and economic criteria
Examples inORB
oEnsuring that planting furrows are on contour and level. Planting into the
sides of the bunds and in the bottom of the furrow instead of only on top of
bunds as is the local practice
oWell designed planting basins -with planting holes that are deep and contain
a lot of organic matter and are designed to create a stepped water flow route
for excess runoff water during rainfall events.
oContour lines in garden that include rock lines, planting of perennial erosion
control species on these contours such as vetiver, lemongrass, sugarcane…
Local innovation:An adaptation to a normal or current practice in a community or
locality that can be considered a good practice
Examples inORB
oWater harvesting in banana basins
oAsh for treating grey water prior to use
oPlanting and irrigating rye grass for fodder for goats
oPipes for gravity feeding of irrigation water from sources quite far away
(usually springs in dried river beds)
oPlanting of garlic to repel snakes and for medicinal purposes (this is an
adaptation from working with indigenous and wild garlic species)
Climate change adaptation:Community members have a conception of what
climate change is and some people will follow specific practices to deal with this.If
the person is consciously doing something and changing their practice to deal with
the issues of climate change then it is considered an adaptation.
It is possible for a local practice to follow some aspects of CCA and some good
practices and local innovations could have elements embedded that are a good
climate change response. This can be explored to become a conscious change
process.
CCA is not really just responding to the environment in making decisions nod taking
action it needs to include some form of recognition of the process and conscious
change. Not all responses to CC have
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Examples inORB
oChanging field cropping patterns no longer planting dryland sorghum and
millet (too dry and too much bird damage), but planting ofirrigated maize in
stead
oPlanting at different times; traditionally for example jugo beans have to be
planted in December and it is considered that not following the traditions in
these cases have exacerbated climate change. Some community members
believethe CC is punishment for not respecting the traditional ways. Jugo
beans are planted by some community members either earlier or later in the
season when it is too dry in December
oIrrigation practices such as gravity fed pipe-lines for irrigation and drip
irrigation.
‘Non local’ innovations: these are introduced for demonstration and exploration
purposes to localities and communities form elsewhere where they would be
considered good practice in climate change adaptation
Examples inORB
oSoil and water conservation techniques
oAppropriate tech pumps; hand pumps, foot pumps, solar pumps
oSmall dams and underground RWH structures
oShade netting structures tunnels
oHousehold level bucket drip irrigation kits
oWorking with commercially produced fruit trees and increased knowledge on
implications of local practice of planting from seed-especially in Lepelle
where fruit is grown specifically for sale…..
Some issues……
Potentially almost everything can be considered climate change adaptation as people
respond to situations when they make decisions.
Are we making any kind of judgement on what is good CCA practiceand what is not and
what are we basing this on… and issues of sustainability.
Below are two small case studies of local innovations we found.
Miriam Marepe (Mabins B)local innovations
Water harvesting: In field zig zag ditches/ furrows to carry excess water in rain storms and
distribute evenly and safely in the garden.
Water sits in them and sinks in
It stops erosion in the garden
Banana basins:Basins are dug in a series for filling up and overflowing and bananas
planted in these. Basins are filled with grass, and are mulched after planting the bananas
Basins are dug knee deep and grass placed with manure to anchor bananas
She observed how water runs and then saw that the water fills up the first one and
then overflows into the next. This gave her the idea to make the ‘series’ of basins
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She also designed the size of the basin by filling up a basin with water the day before
and then coming the next day to see if all the water has sunk in. This means that her
basins are much larger than the ‘normal’ banana basins seen in the area.
Basins are square, rather than circular.
To design the over flow she has an initial idea-then when it rains she goes out and
looks to see what the water is doing and corrects the basin walls and overflow routes
to suite.
This leads to increased water holding capacity for that area of her garden. Bananas
grow a lot better and produce much bigger bananas.
Mulch is important-as it is moist and cool underneath.
Above left: The banana basins in June 2016 when there was still water and Above right: the
basins in November 2016 water no longer available. Garden empty except for bananas
and other fruit trees.
Tsietsi Nkwana (Lepelle) Local Innovations
One young man in the group has a very interesting garden, with a number of interesting
innovations.
He has built stone bundsand check dams to regulate the flow of the running water in his
garden. He grows paw-paws from seed and has recently propagated avocadosso that he
can add these to his orchard.
He has planted fodder grass(rye) for his goats as they are being harassed by the baboons
in the area and will expand his garden for more fodder species.
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Above: Goat fodder, the orchard (with an avocado tree in the foreground) and paw-paw
seedlings
Above left: Bunds and cross ties of stones are used to manage water flow in the orchard and
to irrigate the trees.Above right:A large stone bund is used to anchor bananas and provide
good seepage of water for continued moisture
Plans for the coming month.
(See the attached calendar December 2016-January 2017)
1. Run the demonstration workshops for building of a shade cloth tunnel and drip
kits for Mabins A, B, Sedawe and Willows at a pre-selectedsite in Sedawe -
Christina’s “group” chose the presently unused plot of her mother for the site as a
good demonstration within the community, that is easily accessible, where people
could work together and where the ‘ownership’ of the tunnel would not be in
question.
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The 2nd workshop of this nature will be held for Finale, Oaks and Lepelle together
in Feb-March 2017.
2. Run the 3rddday for the baseline workshops in all five sites: Now chosen as
Mabins A+B, Sedawe, Oaks +Finale, Willows and Lepelle.Content will be
Visioning and ‘Five finger’ discussions and choice of indicators for each group
3. Learning will include the bucket drip irrigation system linked to the bucket filter
already introduced and working with greywater; including building tower gardens
and keyhole beds.
4. Introduction of conservation agriculture trials in three of the communities where
field cropping was prioritized; namely Mabins B, Willows and Finale. Set out
intercropped plots using planting basins and rows for planting maize, (sorghum-
bird resistant variety), cowpeas and beans.
2. AGRISI TEAM MEETING MINUTES; NOVEMBER 2016
Agenda -2016/11/28-29
Finalise compilation of baseline info to date; attendance registers, photos, B2O’s,
written notes, newsprints
Individual interviews; progress, issues…
PLANNING
oLocal facilitators; criteria, process
oLearning group members; formal/ informal…
oExperimentation: Sites for tunnels, drip kits… arrangements
oAssessments for RWH potential in homesteads
oAssessments for needs forcollaborative work; K2C monitoring involvement?
oGroup baseline continuation…Five fingers
oIndividual interviews continuation
Discussions
oGood practise vs climate change adaptation practices
oUnderground tank designs, options, potential implementation…
Training:
oReview of progress for each village
oNext steps
oFarmer experimentation, tower gardens, keyhole beds
Fields- CA
oWhere with whom and when….
Progress and planning
Individual interviews
Planned process of individual interviewing for completion of the baseline not yet started. This
has complicated this present exercise of household level assessments for RWH storage
implementation, collaborative erosion control work and siting of community level
demonstrations such as the tunnels and household level drip irrigation systems.
Availability of interns to assist with the household interviews was not a guaranteed as
assumed and needs to be more carefully negotiated and planned. BB has spoken to the
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K2C coordinator and it would be possible to work with the mentors at village level to be the
enumerators. It is however important for the field work team to be involved as this process is
crucial to getting to understand and know the participants and pick out nuances in
understanding and implementation at household level that have relevance to this
programme. We do not want to send out the enumerators by themselves.
DECISION: Leave the individual household interviews over for January-February and adapt
to also be a process of checking progress as wellas a baseline interview. Negotiate a proper
schedule for working with interns and or the K2C mentors
Baseline and learning workshops
Doing all five workshops consecutively in one week places too much pressure on the team in
terms of logistical arrangements and reporting as there then in reality is no time for either.
DECISION: Richard to motivate for 2 interns to assist in the next two weeks (1st 2 weeks of
December). Their role would be logistical support, recording of workshops and writing up,
collecting of data and hopefully practising a few of the individual homestead questionnaires.
Local facilitators
A decision was made not to push the identification and election process as yet, but to
continue working with the groups to identify individuals emerging from the group who
demonstrate the attitudes and skills that would be required. There are already primary
contact persons in each area who are assisting the facilitation team in setting up meetings
and informing community members regarding processes andworkshops.
Baselines, Visioning and learning
Some changes have been made to the implementation plan put forward in the proposal
through team discussions in the inception planning process to accommodate both for the
seasonal need for action (we started abit later than anticipated and November-January is
the planting season). If we miss this, many of the activities cannot happen at all given that
the programme is only 13 months long.
Thus a mixed process of combining some of the elements of the baseline and visioning with
learning and practical implementation has been adopted. This has implications for the
deliverable timelines and milestone reports as well as invoicing and payment.
In addition AWARD has stipulated a need for combined implementation in 6 villages, as
opposed to the staggered approach of starting in 2-3 villages and bringing another 2-3
villages on board 6 months into the process as was initially proposed.
This has meant an incredibly tight schedule.
Practice and vision; over time you need to revisit and evaluate the practices related to the
vision (financially, socially and environmentally). Scoring it in terms of the Vision.
For this process we are starting with the doing and will need to get to the overall Visioning
process a little later as part of the discussion of trying out new ideas and things… linked into
a process of validation of the experimentation.
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3. TEAM ASSESSMENT
It has been planned to conduct monthly team planning meetings as well as monthly team
reviews summarised in the assessment template developed. The first of these was
conducted in November 2016.
Two document templates (from the M&E annex of the inception report) were completed: (1)
the ‘monthly assessment’ table and (2) ‘project change questions’.
We referred mainly to BB/Trygive’s written notes and experiences, with additional input from
Penelope and Nick from the sessions they attended.
Implementation suggestions re homesteads to demonstrate improved
infrastructure
The improvements include small dams, underground tanks, drip-kits and tunnels. Two
points emerged: first, there was high level of interest expressed amongst participants of
Round 1 (early November) to experiment with new techniques; second, the actual individuals
are not known yet, or even if known, they need to be vetted for suitability.
Meanwhile there is a technical discussion happening involving MDF, consultant Chris Stimie,
and AWARD re appropriate tank design; and Nick Vorono and recent contacts re solar
pumps.
Re: local facilitators, there are potential candidates but they also need to be vetted in greater
detail before making any decisions. It was recommended by BB and Try that criteria should
be gathered from boththe project and the community, but that the project should lead with
its criteria.
Individual baseline assessmentsplanning
The group agreed that these should be conducted after Round 2 (ends December 9).
It was discussed and agreed that the project approach K2C (Kruger to Canyon project) to
see if their EMs (Environmental Monitors) can be used to carry out the baselines, since they
are local and locally based. They would require some training in order to conduct the
assessments. If K2C is agreeable, it wold be good to begin the individual assessments in
the first week of December whilst the team is still present to assist. Otherwise Try is
available to supervise the EMs and provide quality control under that option.
Field process review
A. A team of 4 is ideal for smooth field operations: 1 person facilitating; 1 taking notes; 1
doing logistics (tea, fetching people, registers, photos etc); and 1 setting up experiments.
Plus this number is useful / needed when dealing with several sub-groups for group work
(3 sites have up to 40 people participating).
B. Combining Mabins A & B is sub-optimal but is adequate for now, in terms of assisting
wider spread in the start-up phase. The suitability of the arrangement can be reviewed
in January Round 3 as implementationtakes hold.
C. Vehicle needs were discussed in light of demand on AWARD vehicles. The
arrangement for upcoming Round 2, where two AWARD vehicles will be used on certain
days, was explained; whilst the arrangement will be reviewed afterwards.
D. Otherwise the process was felt to be continuing well, overall.
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Miscellaneous action points
BB and Try will spend this week typing up their notes from 2 weeks of work, for better
reference. Otherwise their general guideline is: ½ day to type 2-day sessions.
BB will take charge of labelling photos, dividing into site folders, and loading to Drop Box.
Try will confirm his availability dates for Round 2, whilst trying for maximum number in
view of its focus on innovations.
RH to ask Erna about the plan for first 2 fielddays of upcoming Round 2, so that basic
planning can be done (next week following the planning is too late).
BB to explore whether K2C EMs are available with Mina, their supervisor.
Indicators: Assessment November 2016
Indicator
Overall target
Actual_November
2016
No of participants in learning groups
100
108
No of learning groups
5
5
No of local facilitators
5
Percentage of participants engaged in CC
adaptation responses
1-2 (45%)
2-3 (25%)
>3 (10-15%)
1-2 (10%)
No of participants experimenting with new
innovations
-local
-co-designed
15
45
5
No of participants showing increased
knowledge
80
Percentage of participants engaged in
collaborative activities
45%
Percentage of participants with improved
livelihoods
-increased availability of food
-increased income
-increased diversity of activities and
livelihoods options
40%
5%
5%
Qualitative assessments;
-stakeholder engagement
-Increased understanding and agency to
act towards increased resilience
-Adaptation and innovations into local
context
-Potential for increased resilience
-Social engagement
Stories, case
studies, photo
diaries, collaborative
work catalogue
2 small case
studiesIncluded
above in section 1.
Also;
-The Willows;
banana circle
-Lepelle; Mr Tsietsi
Shai uses rocks and
banana trees to slow
erosion, planted
grass for his goats
watered by a pipe
that leads from the
tunnel waterfall.
(previous foraging
no longer available)
-Most villages use
ash to purify grey
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water for watering
gardens.
-The Oaks; Using
government
supplied drip
irrigation
-Mabins A; Onions
being planted
between other crops
to support other
plants and fully
utilise space
-Mabins A:
Christine Thobejane
pumps from a small
stream to her
garden (100m)
Understanding:
Examples of people
showing an increased
understanding of CCA
adaptation
Future dated question; explicit vs implicit? What qualifies as
CCA vs good practises?
(i)The communities already have knowledge of Climate
Change although causal reasonsare diverse (log per
learning group).
Rain patterns have shifted.
Traditional farming methods no longer followed. Rains comes
later, are heavier and lasts longer into the year.
Now the weather is hotter than it used to be 10 years ago;
extreme weathertemperature (heat not cold) and rainfall.
Actions:
Examples of people
showing an increased
agency towards increasing
their resilience
Planting of grass for animals for fodder drought response
(Mr Shai).
Shifting planting to match rains.
[also see above for practice examples].
Examples of increased
potential towards
resilience
Willingness to learn / experiment: The general majority of
people who attended Round 1 have stated that they want to
try the modalities shared. The availability of water is seen as
a potential barrier.
Note: because of extreme conditions of the past 2 years,
most peoples’ progress has been going backwards, hence
difficult to talk / think in terms of improvement.
Project Life Change Questions:
1. Do we have examples or storiesof how we or others are in the process of adaptive
management related to CC? (adapt, reflect and respond to….) and examples of
what this adaptive management is?
Examples above.
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2. Do we have stories that show innovation or lack of innovation towards positive
change? What insights have we gained into how innovation can lead to positive
change?(INCREASED RESILIENCE)
Future date? Otherwise existing stories:
Botshabelo piping to mountainsource (6 kms) for community water to 120
users. Users paid R 600 upfront + R20/mth for usage. Reason: lack of
existing / unreliable sources. Cost-sharing effort.
Willows priced water from private boreholes (drinking + other). R30 per 210
ltrs.
Oaks payment for river water (drinking + other) mainly collection
transport/effort.
Lepelle Mr Shai bought pipe (approx. R3000) foraccess from stream
behind tunnel.
3. Do we have stories that show evidence of, or an interest in self organisation towards
collective action? What insights have we gained into how self organisation can lead
to collective action?
Past story: Mabins A cost-sharing water development. Driven by Mr.
Leshike’s (more self taught professional farmer) son enthusiastic about
working with the community (rather than self-centric).
Willows: Mr. Motseo is a champion in organising people to attend meetings,
and making sure they attend.
Willows: requested TA be exempted from participating due to fear of
undermining process / organisation / action.
4. Do we have stories to show that learning together is happening or that there is an
interest in learning together? What insights have we gained about how to learn
together?
Mabins A: Have a potential site where they want collective garden/field (4 ladies),
based on developing a collective water supply from the river (800m).
[Future date stories]
5. Do we have stories of how we and or others are able to think systemically? What
insights have we gained?
Baseline: little evidence-Participants are focussed on their day to day needs and
survival.
6. Do we have stories of how we and or others are able to be inclusive and democratic?
What insights have we gained about how this can be achieved? (STAKEHOLDER
ENGAGEMENT).
Mabins water dev: eg of inclusiveness & democratic vs eg Mr Shai in Lepelle who is
individualistic.
All villages: participation in Round 1 inclusive, open two-way exchange.
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Attachment 1: Detailed upcoming milestone detailed activity plans (Nov-Dec 2016)
2016 November AWARD
MONDAYTUESDAYWEDNESDAY THURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAY
31 0102030405 06
AWARD Baselineand
training grp1
AWARD Baselineand
training grp1
AWARD Baselineand
training grp2
AWARD Baselineand
training grp2
AWARD Baselineand
training grp3
070809101112 13
AWARD Baselineand
training grp3
AWARD Baselineand
training grp4
AWARD Baselineand
training grp4
AWARD Baselineand
training grp5
AWARD OFFICE:TEAM
MEETING: Richard, BB,
Sylvester, SOL
141516171819 20
AWARD TEAMPLANNING:
Forin interviews:
Richard, interns,BB,
Trygive
AWARD: Ind interviews:Try,
BB, interns
AWARD: Ind interviews:
Try,BB, interns
AWARD: Ind
interviews:SOL, BB,
interns
AWARD: Ind
interviews:SOL, BB,
interns
NOTE: SOL to decide on
4 days in one week, 3
days and oneday or 2
days ea week
212223242526 27
AWARD: Ind
interviews:SOL, BB,
interns
AWARD: Ind interviews:SOL,
BB, interns
AWARD: Ind
interviews:SOL, BB,
interns
AWARD OFFICE:TEAM
MEETING: Richard, BB,
Trygive, SOL
282930 010203 04
AWARD TEAMPLANNING
MEETING: Erna, Richard,
Chris, Sylvester, BB, Nick
AWARD Collaborativework
assessment grp 1,2,
baselineday2, grp 5..
AWARD Collaborative
work assessmentgrp3,4
DEMONSTRATION DAY: All
groups - MABINS A and B-
tunnels
DEMONSTRATION DAY: All
groups -FINALE;drip kits
NOTE: Assuming that
Nick could provide
value in the
'construction sub-team"
-ifthat is an interest
AWARD vehicle; 1x double
cab:
AWARD vehicle; 1x double
cab:
AWARD vehicle; 1x
double cab:
AWARD vehicle; 2x
double cabs or 1 double
cab and one kombi
AWARD vehicle; 2x
double cabs or 1 double
cab and one kombi
18
2016 December
MONDAYTUESDAYWEDNESDAY THURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAY
282930 010203 04
050607080910 11
AWARD Baseline and
training grp1
AWARD Baseline and
training grp2
AWARD Baseline and
training grp3
AWARD Baseline and
training grp4
AWARD Baseline and
training grp5 .AWARD
OFFICE:TEAMMEETING:
Richard,BB,Trygive,SOL
AWRD vehicles: 2x double
cabs - Combining of
groups fortraining in grey
water-
AWRD vehicles: 2x double
cabs - Combining of groups
fortraining in grey water-
AWRD vehicles: 2x
doublecabs - Combining
ofgroups fortraining in
grey water-
AWRD vehicles: 2x double
cabs - Combining of
groups fortraining in grey
water-
AWRD vehicles: 1x
doublecab
121314151617 18
AWARD;follow up
mentoring; CA Finale,
Mabins, Willows
AWARD;follow up
mentoring; CA
AWARD;follow up
mentoring; CA
192021222324 25
262728293031 01
19
2017 January
MONDAYTUESDAYWEDNESDAY THURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAY
262728293031 01
020304050607 08
091011121314 15
161718192021 22
232425262728 29
30 31
AWARD TEAMPLANNING
MEETING:Erna,Richard,
Chris, Sylvester, BB, Nick
AWARD Baseline and
training day 2 grp1
Notes:
20
2017
February
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
30
31
01
02
03
04
05
AWARD OFFICE:
TEAM MEETING:
Richard, BB,
Sylvester, SOL
AWARD training day
2 grp2
AWARD training day
2 grp3
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
AWARD training day
2 grp4
AWARD training day 2 grp5
AWARD training day
2 grp6
CA follow up
Ca follow up
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
01
02
03
04
05
21