Milestone 1 - Inception Report

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Acknowledgements
The USAIDResilient WatersProgram is funded by the U.S. Agency for International Developmentand
implemented by Chemonics International Inc. Fixed amount award No. RWP-G3-MDF is a sub-grant
implemented by Mahlathini Development Foundation.
© Mahlathini Development Foundation (MDF)
2 Forresters Lane
Pietermaritzburg, 3201
KZN, South Africa
T (+27)828732289
W www.mahlathini.org
Company Reg. No. 2016/285787/08 (2016)
Non-profit org. Reg. No. 930051028 (2015)
DUNS No. 539162 399
Community based climate change adaptation for increased
water productivity and food security for improved rural
livelihoodsin the Lower Olifants basin
MILESTONE 1: Inception Report
31/01/2020
MILESTONE 1: INCEPTION REPORT
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ABOUT THE PROJECT
Mahlatini Development Foundation (MDF) is a small public benefit non-profit organization consisting of
rural development practitioners who specialize in participatory learning and action processes, sustainable
natural resource management and low external input farming systems, including a focus on rain water
harvesting, conservation agriculture, intensive homestead food production, food security,climate change
adaptationmicro finance and enterprise development.
MDF designs and implements rural developmentprogrammes and training processes providing learning
processes for adults all the way from semi- literate farmers to post graduate university level. We work in
partnership with government and non-government organisations alike. We are sensitive to and mainstream
where possible gender, disability and people living with HIV/AIDs.
Climate variability and climate change (increased temperature, increased variability in rainfall patterns,
increased intensity of storms and increased drought) have far reaching effects on the lives and livelihoods
of the rural poor.Climate change poses a significant threat to South Africa’s water resources, food
security, health, infrastructure, ecosystem services and biodiversity.
This project intends to effect processes for community-based climate change adaptation (CB-CCA) for
improved livelihoods and resilience for project participants through introduction and implementation of
climate resilient agricultural (CRA) practices, building of social agency and stakeholderplatforms and
support for alternative income generation opportunities.
The Innovation Systems methodological approachfor this projectfocuses on local level learning groups
and individual and group experimentation to increase local capacity and agency in building systems for
food security and rural livelihoods.
As a first step, a village level assessment of climate change impacts and general natural resource use
patterns are done. Secondly, an analysis of adaptive strategies and associated practices provides the
platform for implementation of locally derived and prioritized activities and CSA practices. Thirdly, the
learning groups provide the organizational platforms for participatory research and monitoring, improved
governance and agency and collaborative actions around village level water resource management,
rainfed cropping systems, grazing management, village level savings and loan associations and farmer
centers for local input provision and marketing.
Research and development assistance’s key role will be to create and facilitate innovation platforms for
local action in an environment of increasingly fractured social structures, immense economic and survival
pressures, and where direct government support to rural dwellers has decreased dramatically over the last
decade.Use of the smallholder farmer level decision support system will ensure a locally motivated and
owned agenda for action, with potential for transformative adaptation that includes local stakeholders
and service providers in the Communities of Practice (CoPs).
MILESTONE 1: INCEPTION REPORT
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Contents
Table of Contents
1 Executive Summary.......................................................................................................4
1.1 Progress for the reporting period.................................................................................4
2 Project Objectives........................................................................................................4
2.1 Overview of RW Community based CCA Project objectives...................................................4
2.2 Theory of change....................................................................................................4
3 Milestone Description.....................................................................................................9
3.1 Definition of milestone and purpose..............................................................................9
4 Project management plan.............................................................................................12
4.1 Detailed methodology for project implementation..........................................................12
5 Inception Meetings and activities update...........................................................................14
5.1 Inception meetings................................................................................................14
6 Monitoring,evaluation and learning (MEL) plan....................................................................17
6.1 Framework & indicators..........................................................................................17
6.1.1 Baselines.....................................................................................................................18
6.1.2 Ongoing monitoring........................................................................................................18
6.1.3 Evaluation...................................................................................................................18
7 Work Plan for Milestone 2.............................................................................................19
8 Appendices...............................................................................................................20
8.1 Appendix 1: Implementation timeline for RW Community based CCA 2020-2021.......................20
8.2 Appendix 2:Terms of references for an internship application............................................21
8.3Appendix 3: Bi-monthly assessment.............................................................................23
8.4 Appendix 4: Baseline monitoring form..........................................................................26
8.5 Appendix 5: Garden monitoring and individual experimentation plan....................................31
8.6 Appendix 6: PIA methodology and indicators..................................................................33
Appendix 7: Attendance registers....................................................................................43
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1Executive Summary
1.1Progress for the reporting period
This inception report includes the finalised implementation plans, project management plans and MEL
framework, as well as a brief reporting on inception meetings and processes held.
PARTICIPANTS THIS PERIOD
MAHLATHINI: Erna Kruger, Betty Maimela,Sylvester Selala, Constance Rasweswe(Intern)
CHEMONICS: Sitha Mvumvu, Mayford Manika, Lindela Mketeni and Steve Collins.
2Project Objectives
2.1Overview of RW Community based CCA Project
objectives
GOAL: Increased adaptive capacity and resilience to the impacts of climate change for poor, rural
households involved in agriculture.
This goal is aimed specifically at Objectives 3 and 4 as set out in the 2019 Resilient Waters Program APS:
ØObjective 3:Strengthened ability of communities and key institutions to adapt to change,
particularly the impacts of climate change; and
ØObjective 4: Conserved biodiversity and ecosystem services.
OBJECTIVES:
ØReduced vulnerability to climate change by supporting and strengthening collective action,
informed adaptation strategies and practices and tenable institutional arrangements at a local
level, including all relevant service providers and sectors.
ØIncreased sustainability and efficiency of CSA systems in the study areas giving specific
attention to the value chain, using an IS approach
ØAdaptation and scaling out of sustainable CSA systems in selected areasusing livelihoods and
environmental criteria and
ØBuilding and strengthening of different innovation platforms and networks for financing,
awareness and implementation of community level Climate Change Adaptation (CCA)."
2.2Theory of change
The Theory of Change captures the key pathways to the intended outcomes and provides and overview of
proposed indicators and targets. Below is a table outlining the theory of change for the process for 2020-
2021
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Objectives
Key
activities/
tasks
Outputs/milestones
Outcomes/
deliverables
Verifiable
indicators
Performance
indicators
Targets
O1
Reduced
vulnerability to
climate change
by supporting
and
strengthening
collective action,
informed
adaptation
strategies and
practices and
tenable
institutional
arrangements at
a local level.
Visioning
and
decision
support
Community
participation
profiles. Baselines
for all participating
households.
Community level
analysis and
increased
understanding of
climate change,
Initial adaptive
strategies decided
upon. Linkages with
local stakeholders
Baseline
reports for
new village/s
RR3.1
Improved
decision
making
grounded in
the best
available
science. RR
4.1: Improved
management
practices that
mitigate
threats to
biodiversity
3 days/village x
9 villages (Ga
Mametja and Ga
Mamathlola)
~240
participants (Yr.
1); 3
days/village x 5
villages (Ga-
Sekororo and
Ga-Nkawna)
`130
participants (Yr.
2)
CCA
action
plans
Learning groups and
local facilitators/
champions
identified,
functioning and
agency developed
Learning groups
(CoPs) set up;
action planning
CoP reports
9 learning
groups, 4 CC
champions/LFs
(Yr. 1); 5
learning groups,
2 CC
champions/LFs
(Yr. 2)
2 days /village
x7-9 villages
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O2
Increased
sustainability and
efficiency of CSA
systems in the
study areas
giving specific
attention to the
value chain,
using an IS
approach
Learning
and
mentoring
Participatory action
planning for each
Innovation Platform/
CoP - including
learning and
demonstration
workshops and
farmer
experimentation
protocols
Capacity building
for learning groups
and LFs; incl
savings, group
activities,
community
awareness,
Progress
reports
RR3.2
Improved
water
conservation
and water
demand
management
that responds
to CC RR4.1
Improved
management
practices that
mitigate
threats to
biodiversity
RR4.4
Increased
benefits to
target
populations
from
biodiversity
~200
participants; 5
days per village
x 9-12villages
Learning
and
mentoring
Training outlines,
handouts, materials
and reports (3grps x3
trainings
Improved,
diversified
production. Soil
and water
conservation
practices
implemented.
Training
reports.
Gardening
monitoring
reports.
Attendance
registers.
Draft
learning
manual
45% of
participants
implement at
least 1 CC
adaptation
response, 35%
implement 2-3
responses and 5-
10% implement
>3.Draft and
Final learning
manual (April and
September2020)
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Monitoring
Monitoring of
implementation of
best practices at
household level.
Identification and
awareness raising
around local and
new best practice
options (at least 2
identified and
introduced)
Informed
adaptation
strategies and
practices at
household level
Monitoring
reports, case
studies
Monitoring for
7-9 villages
(~120
participants Yr.
1, ~80
participants Yr.
2). 3- 5 Case
studies
developed
O3
Adaptation and
scaling out of
sustainable CSA
systems in
selected areas
using livelihoods
and
environmental
criteria
Reviews
and
networkin
g
Seasonal review and
planning sessions.
Open day
programmes and
events. Cross visits
between learning
groups and linking to
and taking part in
other stakeholder
networking activities
Increased
awareness and
community level
organisation;
collective action
Seasonal
review and
planning
reports (x7).
Open days,
cross visit
and
networking
reports (x3)
RR 1.2
Strengthened
institutional
arrangements
at a variety
of scales
which
enhance
collaborative
resource
management
RR3.3
Increased
climate
4 CC w/s
impact
summaries/
year. 65% of
participants
show increased
knowledge and
response
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O4
Building and
strengthening of
different
innovation
platforms and
networks for
financing,
awareness and
implementation
of community
level Climate
Change
Adaptation
(CCA).
Reviews
and
networkin
g
Special networking
events for
collaborative
activities around
resource
conservation and
livelihoods
diversification
Increased
collaborative
capacity and
agency in CCA
1-2 special
networking
events/
processes per
year;
including
symposiums
and
conferences.
resilience for
targeted
populations
RR4.3
Improved
ecological
integrity and
resilience to
climate
change
~200
participants and
3-4 institutions
collaborate in
strengthening
collaborative
capacity in CCA
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3Milestone Description
3.1Definition of milestone and purpose
Milestone descriptions have been developed forthe RW CB-CCA project for the period starting January
2020and endingNovember 2021.The table below summarises these activities against the milestones and
indicates due dates of these milestones, as well as the RW budget components.
Table 1: Mahlathini Development Foundation Milestone Schedule: January 2020-November 2021
Payment
No.
Milestone
Title
Milestone Verification
Target Due
Date
Milestone
Payment
1
Inception
Report
Inception Report that will include the following:
i.Project management plan showing the staff
complement.
ii.Discussions/ resolutions from inception meetings/
workshops.
iii.Detailed approach methodology for project
implementation.
iv.Revised and updated project implementation plan
with timelines.
v.MEL Targets set.
Annexes:
i.Attendance registers
ii.Photographsfrom inception meetings with
identified stakeholders
31 January
2020
R 99876,38
2
Visioning and
Decision
Support (I)
Progress report
The grantee will submit to Chemonics a Visioning and Decision
Support report detailing the following:
i.Number of participants engagedin the initial
meetings in Ga Mametja and Ga Mamathlola
ii.Baseline Informationfrom participants
iii.Climate change mapshowing the impact within
the communities.
iv.Climate Change Adaptive strategies.
Annexes:
i.Attendance Registersform initial meetings with
participants
ii.Photographsfrom initial meetings with
participants
iii.
The grantee will also submit a progress report outlining progress
in all main activities undertaken in the time period; 20
December- 30 April, (including action plans, learning and
mentoring, monitoring, reviews and networking)
30 April
2020
R 343406,00
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3
Climate
Change
Adaptation
Action Plans
(I)
Progress report
The grantee will submit to Chemonics a Climate Change
Adaptation report detailing the following:
i.Number oflearning groups formed(at least 9)
ii.Local structures and stakeholders engaged.
iii.Profiles of the 5 local facilitators / climate change
champions engaged.
iv.Climate Change Adaptation Action Plans
Annexes:
i.Attendance registersfrom meetings with local
stakeholders
ii.Photographsfrom meetings with local
stakeholders
The grantee will also submit a progress report outlining progress
in all main activities undertaken in the time period; 1stMay 30th
July (including action plans, learning and mentoring, monitoring,
reviews and networking)
6 August
2020
R 264029,00
4
Learning and
Mentoring;
Monitoring(I)
The grantee will submit toChemonics a Learning andMentoring
report detailing thefollowing:
i. Number Learninggroup and Localfacilitator (LF)
training and
mentoring (in soiland waterconservation,intensive
homestead
food production,conservationagriculture andlivestock
integration) witheach of the learninggroups.
ii. Number anddemographics ofpeople trained
iii. Demonstrate howthe training benefits the Resilient
WatersProgram.
iv. Number of VillageSavings and LoanAssociations
(VSLAs) formed
v. The type of savingmechanismsinitiated in the
communities
vi. Number of farmercentres initiated,
vii. Number of Businessdevelopmentprovided and
details
on whichorganization thiswas provided to.
Annexes:
i. Attendance registersfrom the trainingconducted.
ii. Photographs fromthe trainingconducted.
The grantee will also submit toChemonics a report onmonitoring
detailing thefollowing:
i. Initiatives designed.
ii. ExperimentationImplemented.
iii. Progress of theexperimentation.
iv. Communityresponse from theawarenesscampaigns
around
local and new bestpractice options (atleast 2 identified
and introduced).
30
November
2020
R 353507,00
5
Reviews and
networking (1);
Progress report
The grantee will submit to Chemonics a Review and Networking
report detailing the following:
i.Type of Communities of Practiceformed.
ii.Progress in implementation and impact effected
iii.Synergies and relationships formed with
institutions.
iv.Collaboration between local and regional players
The grantee will also submit a progress report outlining progress
in all main activities undertaken in the time period; 1stAugust
202030thMarch 2021(including visioning and decisions
support, action plans, learning and mentoring and monitoring)
Annexes:
i.Attendance registersfrom community of practice
meetings
7 April
2021
R 413638,36
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ii.Photographsfrom community of practice meetings
6
Climate
Change
Adaptation
Action Plans
(II);
Progress report
The grantee will submit toChemonics the followingreports:
A. Visioning and DecisionSupport Report
i. Number ofparticipants engagedin the initial
introductions with
the 150 participantsfrom the 5 villagesin Ga-Sekororo
andGa-Nkawna
ii BaselineInformation.
iii. Climate changemap.
iv. Climate ChangeAdaptive strategies.
B. Climate Change AdaptationPlans detailing the following:
i. Number of climatechange learninggroups formed
ii. Local structures andstakeholdersengaged.
iii. Profiles of the two(2) local facilitatorsengaged.
iv. Climate ChangeAdaptation ActionPlans
30 June
2021
R 373 796,20
7
Learning and
Mentoring (II),
Monitoring
(11)
The grantee will submit toChemonics a Learning andMentoring
report detailing thefollowing:
i. Number Learninggroup and Localfacilitator (LF)
training and
mentoring (in soiland waterconservation,intensive
homestead
food production,conservationagriculture andlivestock
integration) for eachof the learninggroups.
ii. Number anddemographics ofpeople trained
iii. Demonstrate howthe training benefitsthe Resilient
Waters
Program.
iv. Number of VillageSavings and LoanAssociations
(VSLAs) formed
v. The type of savingmechanismsinitiated in the
communities
vi. Number of farmercentres initiated,
vii. Number of Businessdevelopmentprovided and
detailson whichorganization thiswas provided to.
The grantee will also submit toChemonics a final report on
Monitoring detailing thefollowing:
i. Initiatives designed.
ii. ExperimentationImplemented.
iii. Progress of theexperimentation.
iv. Communityresponse from theawareness campaign
initiated.
Annexes:
i. Attendance registersfrom the trainingconducted.
ii. Photographs fromthe trainingconducted.
30
September
2021
R 287417,80
8
Reviews and
networking;
Close-Out
report
The grantee will submit to Chemonics a Review and Networking
report detailing the following:
i.Type of climate change community of practice
formed.
ii.Progress in implementation and impact effected
iii.Synergies and relationships formed with
institutions.
iv.Collaboration between local and regional players
Annexes:
i.Attendance registersfrom community of practice
meetings
ii.Photographsfrom community of practice meetings
The grantee will also submit to Chemonics a final close out report
detailing the project activities with results achieved and lessons
learned
15
November
2021
R 243438,53
Total
R 2272110,27
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4Project management plan
The Mahlathini Development Foundation field team is to consist of two locally based field staff members;
Betty Maimela(junior fieldworker and researcher) and an intern to assist her.The position of intern has
been advertised through MDF’s network and a selection of universities and was placed on the online
Linked-In professional advertisement dashboard. An appointment is to be made in February after
finalisation of interviews.See Appendix 2 for an outlineof the Internship advertisement.
An intern, Constance Rasweswe was brought on board, but only informed MDF that she is registered for a
full time PhD at UKZN in her first week of work. Her contract has been terminated and a second
interviewing process is to be put in place during February 2020. Sylvester Selala, previously employed as a
fieldworker for AgriSI (USAID), isemployed on a short-term contract to provide support for the Climate
Change workshops and introductory processes in new villages (Jan-Feb 2020).
In addition, Sylvester Nzimande, a Permaculture trainer, previously employed at Food and trees for Africa
and now residing in Acornhoek was interviewed. He will be providing gardening training support on a short
-term contractual basis.
Support staff are to be drawn in depending on the planned activities. Broadly, responsibilities are as
follows:
Mazwi Dlamini; To provide training and implementation support in aspects of livestock integration
and conservation agriculture experimentation
Temakholo Mathebula and Nqe Dlamini; to design and implement the microfinance options of the
intervention, including a baseline of savings, loan and insurance options for learninggroup
members, as well as the state of small business development and activity, to design and informed
process of implementation for village savings and loan associations linked to small business
development training and mentoring
Erna Kruger is to provide overall project management support and will visit the areaon a 6 weekly to bi-
monthly basis.
Implementation planning is to coincide with the milestones and a project implementation committee
consisting of all field based and management staff will meet at the end of each milestone (bi-monthly) to
do a review and planning session, work on progress towards indicatorsandcompilation of monitoring
report and progress reports.
Bi-monthly reports will be compiled by the field team (Betty, Erna, intern) using the Bi monthly
Assessment Form (See Appendix 3). Progress reports according to the 7 Milestones developed are to be
submitted as well. Additional documentation is to include the following where appropriate:
Baselines; group and individual/homestead(Appendix 4)
Bi -monthly planning calendars and activity plans
Bi-monthly team review summaries (field and management team)
Garden monitoring forms (local facilitators and field team)(See Appendix 5)
Farmers self-assessment group process (2x/yr) (farmers, local facilitators, field team)
Open days
4.1Detailed methodology for project implementation
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In each of the 5villages where learning groups have been established to date (Mametja, Sedawa,
Turkey, Willowsand Lepelle), continue the learning and mentoring process according to review
and planning for each group.
Establish groups in 3-4 new villages(Mahlakung/Madeira, Worcester, Loraine) through introductory
meetings at community level and facilitation of the CCA workshops (2-3 days), followed by setting
up of learning groups for learning and implementation. Undertake baselines and initial farm
monitoring
Set up anrun a learning process for each village according to their prioritised adaptive measures.
This will include 3 days of training in soil and water conservation, gardening techniques (soil
management), conservation agricultureand nutrition and diversification as well as new topics
identified by the respective groups such as poultry production, planting calendars and seed saving.
Implement farmer level experimentation processes for chosen climate resilient agriculture (CRA)
practices and pilot any collaborative activities, pilot activities and demonstrations (e.g. joint
marketing options, group experimentation with shade cloth tunnels, erosion control and soil and
water conservation (SWC),village level savings and loan associations (VSLAs), water committees
and other activities planned by the groups (1-2 days/month/learning group)
Conduct regular monitoring and mentoring processes for each learning group (1 day/month/group)
Conduct seasonal and yearly review sessions with the learning group clusters for a review of
implementation and planning of future activities and also for participatory assessment of impact
and improved resilience (Minimum 3 sessions per year)
For each learning group undertake:
1.A deepening of the climate change dialogues process to include assessment of practices
for impact on adaptation and resilience
2.In-depth qualitative and quantitative measurement of results of practices implemented
for assessment of impact and
3.Discussions and mentoring centredaround livelihoods diversification options for learning
group members.
Participants undertake:
1.Individual farmer level experimentation processes
2.To work together on joint activities identified by the group for broader scale
rehabilitation and SWC
3.Technical innovation demonstrations at collaboratively chosen homesteads such as rain
water harvesting and storage structures, small green houses and micro drip irrigation
systems
4.Monitoring sessions to check how the implementation is going, from time to time
5.Cross visits to other villages doing similar work
6.Open days and stakeholder involvement of for exampleHlokomela, K2C, Hoedspruit Hub,
the Agroecology network, the Local municipalities, etc to engage in the CC adaptation
processes the participants are working with.
Local facilitators support learning groups by doing garden visits and support for each participant
every month, to help with implementation of farmer experiments and also do garden level
monitoring. They provide a link between MDFandthecommunity and assist with setting up
meetings and processes, arrange for joint working activities, help to identify the sites for
technical innovation demonstrations, provide logistical support and also provide a channel for
feedback from the community regarding process and implementation. They work 8-10 days per
month and receive a stipend of R200/day. Local facilitators will also come together for further
learning and monitoring sessions between themselves and be provided with opportunities for
deepening their own practice through cross visitsand learning sessions.
The Implementation timeline outlining the implementation plan is attached in Appendix 1
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5Inception Meetings and activities
update
5.1Inception meetings
The following meetings have been held:(Attendance registers are attached in Appendix 7)
1.K2C (Kruger to Canyons): DATEJanuary 2020: ATTENDANCE: Cindy Koen, Hope Morema, Erna
Kruger, Betty Maimela: K2C are involved in initiatives to support food security(Phiring, (5 day
organic productiontraining at Hoedspruit Hub, followed by mentoring support from K2C
facilitators) and exploration of a number of local and alternative marketing options for
smallholder farmers that include:
a.“Money for Jam”: which is a cell phone-based platform for advertising and buying organic
produce set up by Steve,based in Johannesburgand is the model K2C will use for their
marketing platform.K2C are in the process of setting up a database and registration of
organic farmers on the understanding that this may take a while, as farmers will need to
increase and improve their production and undergo the PGS (Participatory guarantee
system) certification overseen by SAOSO.
b.Farmers’ markets; there is a monthly farmers market in Hoedspruit on the first Saturday
of each month and a weekly “Wellness Wednesday” market at the Hlokomela Herb garden
centre where K2C has a stall for farmers’ produce. Farmers supported by MDF in Mametja
have been attending these markets under the K2C banner, an arrangement set up through
the organisations’ field workers, which is beneficial for the smallholders. This
arrangement has now been agreed to by K2C management, as farmers under their banner
are not yet at a stage where they can regularly offer produce for sale.
Figure 1: Above left; farmers from our programme selling produced alongside K2C in their Hoedspruit Farmers’
market stall. Above right: Christina Thobejane (Sedawa LF) and Mashego Shaai (Turkey 2), at our stall at the
Hlokomela Wellness Wednesday, a weekly market held on the Hlokomela premises.
c.“From the region for the region” is a new and ambitious process coordinated by K2C for
sale of organic produce in the region, focussing also on the tourism industry. This process
is in its’ initial stages.
It was agreed that communication would be ongoing and that closer collaboration could be sought at
a later stage, depending on the progress made in their projects.
MILESTONE 1: INCEPTION REPORT
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2.AWARD: DATE: 2020/01/24. ATTENDANCE: Erna Kruger, Derick du Toit, Betty Maimela. AWARD is
presently involved in strengthening local networking and stakeholder engagement in Agroecology
and CCAthrough a process funded by DKA (German catholic Church). They are also involved in a
youth capacity development initiative under the same banner of increasing capacity and social
agency in the region.A list of action items for collaboration between MDF and AWARD was
compiled for this meeting:
a.Planning meeting on the24thFebruary at AWARD. Maria, from DKA to be hosted jointly 25-
26 Feb (report back and field trip) Tuesday- Wednesday
b.25th for PGS Orientation meeting: For the whole cluster. An agenda will be organised
closer to the time and will marketing options for vegetables, herbs and mangoes, as well
as an input on microfinance support and small business development (Nqe Dlamini/ Tema
Mathebula).
c.Meeting with the Municipal Manager (Thabo ?, with MDF, BB and Derick) regarding Halls,
JoJo tanks, development of an MoU in DRR and CCA and CRA; February 27th Thursday
d.Meeting with Hlokomela to negotiate expansion of smallholder sales. Gavin TeBrake from
Hlokomela has indicated a willingness to include herbs form smallholders in his marketing
arrangements and has already assisted with packaging and sale of rocket and parsley.
e.PGS training: Orientation, training, dry-run evaluation… 4months: Orientation can include
introduction into organic production and marketing and small business linked into Organic
production and five fingers.
f.CIRAD: A group run by Stephano Feralfiworking with economics and agriculture
(Behavioural economist). Worked at UP and FAO. He has an opportunity to do some work
on smallholder farming answering the question: “How do we make decisions on our
farming focus”. ‘What influences their decisions” What underpins these decisions”. He
wants to help us structure a process and do a survey with some of the farmers… 2ndto 5th
of March. BB will be working with them and take them to Sekhukhune as well
g.We would like to set up a training run by an Ukuvuna project participant, Anna on local
seedbanks and seed saving for our participants. These are for traditional and OPV
varieties that do not have intellectual property or licencing implications.
3.A SPRING OFHOPE: DATE:2020/01/21. ATTENDANCE Erna Kruger, Trygive Nxumalo and Christina
Thobejane (Local Facilitator for Sedawa). This meeting revolved around the potential of A Spring
of Hope to provide financial assistance and implementationsupport to the water committees in
Sedawa, Mametja and Turkey. Mr Nxumalo felt that there was a strong possibility of such support,
given the historic connection between these organisations and his previous involvement with the
learning groups and also because the smallholdersare well organised and actively producing. He
urged the groups to ensure that they have traditional authority approval and documentation for
the land where boreholes would be drilled and suggested MDF and the groups make a formal
application to his director, Joanne Taylor. This will be done without delay.
MILESTONE 1: INCEPTION REPORT
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Figure 2:Trygive Nxumalo from A
Spring of Hope (in the centre with light
blue clothing), hosting the farmer
participants from the FMSS workshop
at their centre and garden.
4.M-PAK (Messina Verpakking EDMS Bpk): DATE: 2020/01/22 ATTENDANCE: Erna Kruger, Flip, Benjie
and Carina Nel. This meeting was held to finalise an agreement for supply of mangoes from the
RW project participant farmers to M-Pak for drying purposes. M-Pak has agreed to accept small
quantities of mangoes from these farmers at any time and to pay R4.20/kg for this produce, as
long as the fruit fulfils their specifications. They are confident that the smallholders can increase
their supply over time to the required amounts and see this as a long term, developmental
relationship. They have offered to assist in sourcing better varieties for the smallholders and also
to work with MDF on join funding options for developing a robust smallholder supply and
marketing initiative. They are also interested in exploring the organic mango market and prepared
to consider organic certification for the packhouse, if supply can be increased and guaranteed.
Betty Maimela and 5 of the smallholder farmers, who are presently able to supply mangoes for
drying, are to visit the facility in the coming week, to arrange for the initial delivery process and
marketing arrangements.Workshops are to be held in Lepelle, Turkey, Sedawa, Mametja, Willows
and Finale to discuss expansion of production as well as specifications regarding fruit type, size
and quality.
Figure 3: Above left; Carina Nel, providing a tour of the facility to Erna Kruger, Above centre; Making of fruit rolls
and drying mangoes and Above right; Betty discussions and showing samples, of mangoes for drying, as well as
expansion of production. Participants made orders for Tommy Atkins, Keitt and Kent varieties.
MILESTONE 1: INCEPTION REPORT
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5.Farmer Manged Seed Systems in Limpopo: A three day workshop (20-22 January 2020),organised
jointly by ACB (African Centre for Biodiversity), AWARD and MDF was held for farmer at WITS Rural
Facility close toAcornhoek. 4 Farmers from our programme attendedthe workshop and also
displayed their saved seed alongside those of other farmers. A work group has been appointed to
put together a policy document around developing an enabling environment for farmer managed
seed systems, which is to be presented to anddiscussed with the Department of Agriculture,
among other stakeholders.
Figure 4: Above left; participants at the FMSS in Limpopo workshop at WITs Rural Facility. Above right; an example
of a seed display put together by smallholder farmers for the workshop
6Monitoring,evaluationandlearning
(MEL) plan
6.1Framework & indicators
(See Theory of Change above for targets and overall indicators)
In addition, regular (bi-monthly) summaries of progress using the following indicators will be made.
Indicator
Overall target
No of participants in learning groups
370
No of learning groups
9-12
-No of local facilitators
6
Percentage of participants engaged in CC adaptation responses
1-2 (45%)
2-3 (25%)
>3 (10-15%)
No of participants experimenting with new innovations
-local
-co-designed
15%
45%
No of participants showing increased knowledge
35%
Percentage of participants engaged in collaborative activities
35%
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Percentage of participants with improved livelihoods
-increased availability of food
-increased income
-increased diversity of activities and livelihoods options
40%
5%
5%
Qualitative assessments;
-stakeholder engagement
-Increased understanding and agency to act towards increased
resilience
- Adaptation and innovations into local context
-Potential for increased resilience
-Social engagement
Stories, case studies (5-6),
CC impact summaries (4),
best practices booklet
The Bi-monthly summary form, with qualitative indicators and life change questions are shown in
Appendix 3.
6.1.1Baselines
Baselines are constructed using a number of different processes:
- The CCA workshops; where participants talk to the impacts of CC on their environment and
livelihoods, their past and present farming activities and projections for the future
- Baseline interviews: (Baseline monitoringform Appendix 4) that gives an indication of their
present situation and implementation (This is not a full livelihoods questionnaire, but includes
some aspects of livelihoods).
- Facilitator observation checklists: Interviewers/ facilitators assist the household participant to
draw a homestead land use plan with present practises and flag issues and potential innovations
(what they are thinking of doing now) for the household. In addition, they make certain
observations that are needed for the overall planning processes
6.1.2 Ongoing monitoring
- Garden monitoring form (Monthly):(See Appendix 5):To be filled in for each participant at
least once in a planting season (4months) and at least twice per annum, by and with the local
facilitators to assess CC adaptation and gardening implementation. Thesearecompiled with
photographs of the garden intoa narrative progress report and into excel sheets for quantitative
indicators.
- Stories or case studies: Within the themes of managing adaptively, thinking systemically,
innovation towards positive change, self -organisation leading to collective action and learning
together. These are to be used in progress reports, but also towards further media and
communications.
- Group reflections and open days: Using the CC assessments and plans review progress and also
level of change and impact- incorporating defined indicators
- Team reflections (bi-monthly):Reflection on CC adaptation using indicators alongside general
progress, issues, learning and planning. (project implementation committeeAppendix 3.
6.1.3 Evaluation
- Progress reports (x6) and final report - based on project deliverables and milestones.
- Participatory Impact assessments and snapshots are to be compiled towards the ned of the project
timeframe for individuals across learning groups and the learning group clusters. (See Appendix 6
for outlines of the PIA methodology and indicators
MILESTONE 1: INCEPTION REPORT
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Upon close out a final close out report stating zero continued financial responsibility from USAID will be
written
7Work Plan for Milestone 2
Below a very brief work plan is presented in the form of a list, to give an indication of the activity focus
areas for the coming reporting period of February-April 2020.
1.CCA introduction workshops for three new villages (Worcester, Madeira and Lorraine), along with
baseline interviews and compilation of a baseline report
2.Development of CCA strategies for new groups andconsolidation of reviews and action plans for
existing groups
3.Recap of agroecology/permaculture training workshops for existing groups and start on training for
new groups
4.Continue and finalise an order list for new mango varieties for participants to be involved in organic
marketing and drying
5.Continue with organic marketing initiative with existing groups; Hlokomela Wellness Wednesday and
monthly farmers’ market as well as ad hoc orders from restaurants such as Amigos and Hat and Creek.
6.Set up a PGS workshop for the learning group cluster and other stakeholders; to include also an input
on marketing for vegetables, herbs and mangoes and microfinance and small business development
options (end February)
7.Meetings with DKA, CIRAD and the Maruleng Municipality, to effect various outcomes in networking,
stakeholder engagement and indicator development
8.Continue with water committees in Sedawa and Turkey to finalise their borehole projects and water
access arrangements for agricultural production.
9.Involve A Spring of Hope in further support to learning groups to increase their access to agricultural
water supply options.
10.Employ and induct a new intern to support the process.
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8Appendices
8.1Appendix 1: Implementation timeline for RW Community based CCA 2020-2021
IMPLEMENTATION TIMELINE
Objectives MaintasksJan Feb Mar Apr May Jun JulAugSep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun JulAug Sep Oct Nov
Inception report
Visioning and decision
support
CCA action plans
Learning and
mentoring
Monitoring
Adaptation and scaling out of
sustainable CSA systems in selected
areas using livelihoods and
environmental criteria
Reviews and
networking; CoPs and
learning groups
Networki
ng
session
Learning
group
reviews
Networki
ng
session
Networkin
g session
Networki
ng
session
Buildingand strengthening of
different innovation platforms and
networks for financing, awareness
and implementation of community
level ClimateChange Adaptation
(CCA).
Reviews and
networking;
Stakeholder
involvement,
collaboration
Theme:
Best
practices
in CCA
Theme:
Water
managem
entand
allocatio
n
Theme:
Livelihoo
ds
diversific
ation
theme:
Climate
change
resilience
and
biodiversi
ty
2020
2021
Intensivehousehold food production,soil
and water conservation,natural resource
management, water useefficiency;
marketing
Learninggroup
reviews,resilience
snapshots
Learninggroup
reviews,snapshots
Learninggroup
reviews,snapshots
Reduced vulnerability to climate
change by supporting and
strengthening collective action,
informedadaptation strategies and
practices and tenable institutional
arrangements at a local level.
Increased sustainability and efficiency
of CSA systems in the study areas
giving specific attention to the value
chain, using an IS approach
Intensivehousehold food production,Soil and water conservation, natural
resource management, water useefficiency, marketing
Conservation Agriculture,livestock
integration, waterproductivity
Conservation Agriculture,
livestock integration,water
productivity
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8.2Appendix 2:
Terms of Reference for an INTERNSHIP position in Community level Climate
Change Adaptation
Description: Full time; 1 yearinternship-Field assistant and junior researcher to support the
Conservation Agriculture and Climate Resilient Agriculture participatory research
processes within Mahlathini Development Foundation
An internship position is being offered by Mahlathini Development Foundation, based in
Pietermaritzburg and working in rural communities in both KZN and Limpopo.
This position is for an entry level professional in the agricultural and environmental development
field and for someone with an interest in Climate Change and how smallholder farmers can best
adapt and mitigate the increasingly devastating effects of this change on the rural poor.
1
Qualifications/Requirements
- Degree or post graduate qualification in a relevant field (agriculture, environment, food security;
community development)
- Drivers licence and some experience in driving
- Fluency in siPedi and/or isiZulu and English- both written and spoken
- Computer literacy; using common programmes within the Microsoft Office suite
- Ability to work independently
- Willingness to travel and spend time in smallholder communities and villages
- Interest in Agroecology and Climate Smart Agriculture
2
Description
The intern will assist the Mahlathiniteam with field-based activities and data collection and analysis
with smallholder farmers and gardeners including;
- Monitoring of farming activities and farmer level trials
- Management of soil fertility and soil health sampling and analysis
- Management of soil water measurements and processes, including run-off, infiltration, bulk density,
gravimetric water sampling, water sensors and weather stations
- Support organisation and running of training workshops
- Working closely with local facilitators in the villages
- Recording, translation and analysis of monitoring data
- Logistical support for field events
- Contribute to timeous report writing
In addition, the incumbent will be expected to have their own laptop and bea competent driver, or
be prepared to use local transport options if they do not.
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3
Remuneration
Negotiable based on qualifications and experience
4
Contact
Please send a CV and motivation letter to the following email address before or on Monday 18thof
November 2019
info@mahlathini.org
Contact person: Erna Kruger: Cell 0828732289
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8.3Appendix 3: Bi-monthly assessment
Contributing to:
Objective 3: Strengthened Ability of Communities and Key Institutions to Adapt to Change,
Particularly the Impacts of Climate Change (RR3.1, RR3.2and RR 3.3)
Objective 4: Conserved Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (RR4.1 .RR 4.3and RR4.4)
The process of intervention with farmer participants will follow the chronology outlined below:
Understanding current practices
Develop a vision of what could be
Discuss innovations and agree to try; sometimes with collaborative work
Develop a farm design and plan that includes experimentation with new ideas
Ongoing mentoring of implementation and experimentation
Periodic cluster sessions
Periodic monitoring and self-assessment
And networking and cross visits (1 of each per year)
A.On a bi-monthly basis photographs from all field staff is to be given captions and compiled
in one directory to be placed on drop box.
B.Regular (bi-monthly) summaries of progress using the following indicators will be made:
Indicator
Overall target
No of participants in learning groups
240
No of learning groups
9-12
No of local facilitators
6
Percentage of participants engaged in CC adaptation responses
1-2 (45%)
2-3 (25%)
>3 (10-15%)
No of participants experimenting with new innovations
-local
-co-designed
15%
45%
No of participants showing increased knowledge
35%
Percentage of participants engaged in collaborative activities
35%
Percentage of participants with improved livelihoods
-increased availability of food
-increased income
-increased diversity of activities and livelihoods options
40%
5%
5%
Qualitativeassessments;
-stakeholder engagement
-Increased understanding and agency to act towards increased
resilience
- Adaptation and innovations into local context
-Potential for increased resilience
-Social engagement
Stories, case studies (6), CC
impact summaries (4), best
practices booklet
C.And there are more qualitative questions to consider that can draw out change in various
domains through systemic reflectionand which will be captured in the form below.
BI-MONTLHY FORM…………………………..Date…………………………………Project……………………………………
Each team member who has been part of interventions at community level in the time frameadd their
figures and perspectives to come up with a corroborated summary figure for the month.
MILESTONE 1: INCEPTION REPORT
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Indicator
No
No of participants in
learning groups
As per registers (with Erna and Sylvester)
No of learning groups
As per registers
No of local facilitators
Percentage of participants
engaged in CC adaptation
responses
1-2 ( %) See below
2-3 ( %)
>3 ( %)
No of participants
experimenting with new
innovations
-local
-co-designed
Dependant on observations from HH interviews which have not
yet taken place.
-
-
No of participants showing
increased knowledge
Percentage of participants
engaged in collaborative
activities
Percentage of participants
with improved livelihoods
-increased availability of
food
-increased income
-increased diversity of
activities andlivelihoods
options
Examples of local
adaptations and innovations
that have come to the fore
(Describe what it is who is
doing it and where- with an
idea of where it has come
from and what the intention
of the innovation/adaptation
is)
Understanding: Examples of
people showing an increased
understanding (i) of CCA
adaptation and increased
agency (ii) towards
increasing their resilience
Actions:
Examples of people showing
an increased understanding
(i) of CCA adaptation and
increased agency (ii)
towards increasing their
resilience
Examples of increased
potential towards resilience
*For the examples the person’s name and surname and village needs to be given
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1.Project Life Change Questions:
1.Do we have examples or stories of how we or others are in the process of adaptive management
related to CC? (adapt, reflect and respond to….) and examples of what this adaptive management
is?
2.Do we have stories that show innovation or lack of innovation towards positive change? What
insights have we gained into how innovation can lead to positive change?(INCREASED RESILIENCE)
3.Do we have stories that show evidence of, or an interest in self organisation towards collective
action? What insights have we gained into how self organisation can lead to collective action?
4.Do we have stories to show that learning together is happening or that there is an interest in
learning together? What insights have we gained about how to learn together?
5.Do we have stories of how we and or others are able to be inclusive and democratic? What insights
have we gained about how this can be achieved? (STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT).
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8.4Appendix 4: Baseline monitoring form
Date
Area
Village
GPS
Surname
First
name
Cell no
ID number
Gender
♀"#
♂%&
Household
head (Y/N)
Education
Members of Social
organisation/s
(describe) e.g.
savings group,
learning group…)
No of Adults in hh
No of children
Income sources
(grants,
employment,
remittances, other
specify)
Level of
income
(monthly
hh)
Type of grant (s) -
add in no
Child Support Old Age Foster care
Scale of operation
0,1-1ha
1-2 ha
>2ha
Farming activities
Garden (size)
Fields (size)
Livestock (No)
Cattle
Goats
Chickens
Other:
Nat resources-
specify
Trees
Indigenous plants
Resources and
infrastructure
Water (list -tick
and describe)
-tap
-standpipe
HH infrastructure
-dwellings
- electricity
-fencing
Farming
infrastructure and
tools (list
Other
MILESTONE 1: INCEPTION REPORT
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-RWH
-Other
-other
Other livelihood
activities (list)
Market access
(describe)
Training and
advice
(Name sources of
support)
Garden description and size: Include a map drawing of homestead with all aspects including fencing,
water sources, fruit, windbreaks, trees, vegetables, kraals, run off, dwellings, slope, aspect, erosion:
Proportion of vegetable garden in use:- cultivated within the last 6 months (Put as a
percentage)……………………………….
PRESENT INFRASTRUCTURE?
Yes
No
Comments; On quantity, state, interesting
things..
a.Fencing
b.Jo-Jo tanks
c.Municipal water supply tap in
yard reliability- how often it
works
d.Irrigation; hoses, pipes, buckets,
bottles
e.Other local innovations
boreholes……..
PRESENT PRACTISES?
Yes
No
Detailed description of what is there) (Name
all types of plants present, with some idea of
quantity)
a)Vegetables
b)Fruit
c)Herbs and multifunctional
plants (including
windbreaks, hedges,
flowers)
MILESTONE 1: INCEPTION REPORT
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d)Nursery
e)Field crops (CA)
f)Livestock
g)Soil fertility: (What is
used, how much who
often) (Compost,manure
(type), fertilizer, liquid
manure, green manures,
legumes……
h)Garden management;
tillage practices
(incl .furrows
i)Livestock integration:
CONSERVATION PRINCIPLES?
Yes
No
Detailed description of what is there- list
practices
Water management:
a)Infiltration (soil structure,
texture, organic matter)
b)Greywater use and
management (filtered,
ash, dedicated structures)
c)Water harvesting and
storage (diversion
furrows, swales, bunds,
small stone walls, check
dams, gabions, Water
conservation (organic
matter, mulching)
d)……..
Soil erosion control
e)contours, ditches,
f)stone lines,
g)furrows (function)
h)…………..
Soil health
i)State of soil; presence of
organic matter, presence
of erosion, presence of
compaction (is the soil
very hard just below the
surface,
MILESTONE 1: INCEPTION REPORT
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j)Bed design (trench beds,
ridges, dedicated beds
and paths, terraces,
sunken/raised beds,
k)Compost, improved
manure, green manures,
legumes,
l)………
Diversity/ crop management
m)Mixed cropping
n)Crop rotation
o)Seed saving
p)Nursery/ propagation
q)Continuity- seedling
production
r)Natural pest and disease
control practices
s)……………………..
Wild/ diverse plants
t)Indigenous or medicinal
plants
u)Windbreaks/ hedges/ live
fencing
v)Herbs, bee fodder, pest
and disease control
species
HOUSEHOLD PROVISIONING (comments from interviewee)
Food provided for family; what, how much, how often (staples,vegetables, fruit, small livestock):
Nutritional aspects of cropping:
Selling:what, how much, how often, income
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Household observation checklist(for the interviewer)
Extent and diversity of garden
(presence of resources,
manure, different trees.
Labour and general health
Overall situation in the
household (are there any
obvious social issues)
Any local innovations and
interesting things (different
plants, unusual crops e.g.
white sorghum, millet, jugo
beans, herbs, wild plants,
medicinal plants, herbs,
fruit) ….
Social engagement groups,
stokvels, church, farming,
selling,
Non-agricultural livelihood
activities (e.g. craft, use of
natural resources in the area,
selling water?
Environmental issues; soil
degradation, erosion,
Potential for SWC and RWH
are there nice paved areas, no
of houses to collect water from,
willingness in household to
contribute labour
Suitability for technical
innovation (greenhouse, drip
kits, RWH)-
Potential as local facilitator
Interest and potential for field
cropping and being a CA
volunteer
Other
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8.5Appendix 5: Garden monitoring and individual
experimentation plan
NAME AND SURNAME:
VILLAGE:
DATE:
CONSERVATION PRINCIPLES? FIVE FINGERS
Detailed description of what is there- list
practices
Water management:
w)Infiltration/ run off , crusting
x)Organic matter in and on the soil
y)Greywater use and management
(filtered, ash, dedicated
structures tower garden/sack
garden)
z)Water harvesting and storage
(check dams, gabions, drums,
basins.. small dams, Jo-Jos)
aa)Mulching
bb)Drip irrigation
cc)Other……………………
Control of soil movement:
dd)Contours, diversion ditches,
swales, bunds,
ee)stone lines,
ff)furrows (function)
gg)Other..…………..
Soil health:
hh)Bed design (trench beds, ridges,
dedicated beds and paths,
terraces, sunken/raised beds,
banana basins, eco circles..
ii)Compost, improved manure, green
manures, legumes,
jj)………
Improved crop management:
kk)Mixed cropping
ll)Crop rotation
mm)Seed saving
nn)Nursery/ propagation
oo)Continuity- seedling production
pp)Natural pest and disease control
practices
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qq)……………………..
Looking after indigenous plants:
rr)Indigenous or medicinal plants
ss)Indigenous fruit
tt)Other indigenous plants; including
windbreaks, hedges…
uu)Bee fodder, pest and disease
control species
HOUSEHOLD PROVISIONING (comments from interviewee)
Food provided for family; what, how much, how often (staples,vegetables, fruit, small livestock):
Selling:what, how much, how often, income
INDIVIDUAL EXPERIMENTATION
Please list:
1.…………………………
2.…………………………….
3.………………………………..
4.…………………………………..
5.…………………………………..
And draw in as part of the farmer work plan
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8.6Appendix 6: PIA methodology and indicators
8.6.1PIA workshop outline
1. Recap climate change impacts
ØExplore what people have noticed about impacts and make lists under headings: natural, physical,
economic, human and social
Group level brainstorming of ideas; written on cards under the headings given, with arrows for increase
or decrease
2. Recap adaptive strategies/ practices
ØWhat have people been doing to adapt to this, fix the problems, make things better?
ØWhat can be done? (first look at hat has been done and then any further ideas of what can be
done)
ØElucidate adaptations for each category: natural, physical, economic human, social
Group level brainstorming; write on different cards (those done and those thought of) and place next to
the impact, indicate with a * which of these have been facilitated or introduced (and by whom) this can
be other farmers, projects, extension officers….
3. Practices: Recap 5 fingers and list all practices under each category
ØRe-introduce the 5 fingersconcept and include a further category of thewhole hand which is
the social and personal
ØWhich practices have been implemented (introduced and other)?
Go around in the circle and each person mentions what s/he has done (productive, economic, social,
personal actions) and what she would still liketo try
ØAdd these practices to the five fingers diagram
Make an A1 diagram of the five finger and then add practices on cards
ØGo through practices recommended through the DSS
Use cards with ranked practices from the DSS- describe and show the ones that people are not familiar
with.
ØRank practices for next round of implementation
Rank the list of practices by a show of hands.
4. What have been the changes or benefits from eachpractice
ØWhat changes have there been?
Brainstorming changes an interrogate to get to the more
ØHow important are these changes to your lives? How do you decide? Which criteria would you use
to decide?
Do a matrix ranking: changes (in columns), criteria (in rows) Use proportional piling, working down each
column by asking “how important is this practice for the criteria” and comparing the practices with each
other (to an extent) as you go down the list…. Exercise is done in small groups of 5-8 participants
Below is an example of how this could look
food
income
Soil, water
Access,
ease,
knowledge
Trench beds
Tunnels
CA
Cover crops
Legumes
MILESTONE 1: INCEPTION REPORT
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Other crops;
potatoes,
sweet potatoes
Savings
Subsidised
inputs
Saving for
inputs
Farmer centre
Small
businesses
Learning group
Water
committee
5. Expanding on practices
ØIntroduce new practices for each of five fingers
ØParticipants assess each practice (after deciding on criteria for how you decide this practice is
useful?)
Eventually the whole exercise can be summarised in the table below
Natural
Physical
Economic
Human
Social
CC impacts
Adaptive
strategies
Actions/
practices
Changes due
to practices
Importance of
these changes
to your
livelihood
8.6.2Individual impact assessment questionnaire
Note 1: The assumption is that you will have worked with participants who are to complete this
questionnairefor a while and know them reasonably well. Some of the answers here you can fill in
yourselves, for things that are obvious and known and in fact the questionnaire can be managed as a
conversation, with you filling in the relevant information and probing where some questions remain
unanswered. It does not have to be that the farmer has to answer each question meticulously in
order…
Date: …../……/……/
1. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE PARTICIPANT
Name and Surname:
MILESTONE 1: INCEPTION REPORT
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Village:
GPS co-ordinates (homestead):
Age:
Gender:
Household head (Yes/No):
Number of household members (Children & adults):
Main source of income (social grant/employment/self-employment/unemployed):
Number of child and pension grants:
Educational level (no schooling, primary school, high school, passed grade 12):
Main source of energy for cooking (electricity, gas/paraffin, wood/charcoal):
Main source of drinking water (own tap, neighbours or communal tap, water tanker or
river/spring):
2. FARM ACTIVITIES AND INFRASTRUCTURE
a)What is the total land size used:
Increased in
farming (Size)
Before (Size in m2)
Now (Size in m2)
Comment:
Gardening
Field
cropping
Livestock
(No of cattle, goats,
chickens, pigs…)
Trees and other
resources(no of
fruit, indigenous…)
b) What activities are undertaken:
Increased diversity
in farming
Yes/No Before
Y/N now
Comment: why or
why not
Gardening
Field
cropping
Livestock
Trees and other
resources
c) Practices, crops planted, livestock kept (detail and changes
Increased
diversity (1)
Management
and practices
before
Numbe
r of
practice
No
no
w
What has
changed; new
crops
What has
changed; new
practices
What has
changed; new
management
MILESTONE 1: INCEPTION REPORT
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s
Before
Gardening
e.g. use of
manure, flat beds
1
4
e.g Chinese cabbage,
leeks
e.g Trenches,
mulching, mixed
cropping, P&D control
e.g Drip irrigation,
tunnel
Field
cropping
e.g. traditional
cropping maize
1
3
e.g beans, cowpeas cc
e.g. CA, intercropping,
cover crops,
e.gClose spacing,
herbicides
Livestock
Trees and
other
resources
3. FIVE FINGERS: CONSERVATION PRINCIPLES
CONSERVATION PRINCIPLES? FIVE FINGERS
Detailed description of what is there-
list practices.
Water management:
vv)Infiltration/ run off , crusting
ww)Organic matter in and on the soil
xx)Greywater use and management
(filtered, ash, dedicated structures
tower garden/sack garden)
yy)Water harvesting and storage (check
dams, gabions, drums, basins.. small
dams, Jo-Jos)
zz)Mulching
aaa)Drip irrigation
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bbb)Other……………………
Control of soil movement:
ccc)Contours, diversion ditches, swales,
bunds,
ddd)stone lines,
eee)furrows (function)
fff)Other..…………..
Soil health:
ggg)Bed design (trench beds, ridges,
dedicated beds and paths, terraces,
sunken/raised beds, banana basins,
eco circles..
hhh)Compost, improved manure, green
manures, legumes,
iii)………
Improved crop management:
jjj)Mixed cropping
kkk)Crop rotation
lll)Seed saving
mmm)Nursery/ propagation
nnn)Continuity- seedling production
ooo)Natural pest and disease control
practices
ppp)Other (e.g. tunnels)
Improved livestock management
qqq)Fodder production (give some
details)
rrr)Fodder management; cutting,
baling, storing
sss)Vaccinations and supplements
ttt)Housing options (incl chicken
tractors
uuu)Other…..
Looking after indigenous plants:
vvv)Indigenous or medicinal plants
www)Indigenous fruit
xxx)Other indigenous plants; including
windbreaks, hedges…
yyy)Bee fodder, pest and disease control
species
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4. Productivity: Increase in diversity and yields
Increased
productivity
Types
BEFORE:
Quantity
(KG, No)
NOW:
Quantity
(KG,No)
Comment
Gardening
e.g. spinach
40kg
80kg
Increased yield in trench beds
Fieldcropping
Livestock
Trees and
other
resources
a)How has this knowledge helped you to deal with climate change and variability in your garden?
Complete table below
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Past Issues
Past practice
Impact (incl soil
health and fertility
and soil and water
conservation
Lessons
b) Please rank the following elements for each practice you have decided to experiment with:Use a
scale of -1 to +3 Note; This question works in tandem with the question above and now ranks the
‘impacts’ mentioned above. Once you have done this a few times, it will be possible to do these two
questions together
-1 = worse than normal practice, 0=no change, 1=some positive change, 2=medium positive change, 3=
high positive change
Name of
practice
Soil
Water
Productivity
Labour
Pest and
disease
control
Cost and
maintenance
Livelihoods
Adaptation
1
2
3
4
5
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6
7
8
c) Water management
Increased water
use efficiency
(inclRWH,
water holding,
water access,
water
productivity)
Increase Access
IncreaseRWH
Increasewater
holding
increasewater
productivity
(irrigation)
SCALE
0= same or worse
than before; 1=
somewhat better
than before, 2=
much better than
before
d) Growing season; longer, different, increased
Increased growing
season
Yes/no
Before
Yes/no
Now
Comment
Gardening
e.g.Now grows crops in winter in garden and
fields
Field
cropping
Livestock
Trees and other
resources
5. HOUSEHOLD PROVISIONING & FOOD SECURITY
a) Income and food provision
Increased
livelihood
security
(income)
Income before (ave monthly in
Rands)
Income now (Ave monthly in
Rands)
Comments
Increased
livelihood
security
(Household
provisioning
and food
security)
Food types
(staples, veg,
livestock, fruit)
Quantity/ week
(kg)
No of times
eaten /week
(1-7)
Sales/week (in
Rands)
Comments
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b) Safety nets and diversification
Increased livelihood
diversity/options
Income options
Before
Income options
Now
Comment; name
new options e.g.
which crops, etc
Scale
1=social grants; 2=
remittances;
3=farming
income;4= small
business;
5=employment
Savings (safety,
security,
achievement)
Amount per month
Before
Amount per month
Now
Use of savings
Scale
1=food;
2=household use;
3=education; 4=
production; 5=other
6. Social agency
LEARNING AND IMPLEMENTATION:
a)What have you learnt about dealing with climate change and the climatic extremes (intensity of
rain, wind and sun), that it presents?
b)What is your experience of climate change in relation to farming activities and overall human
well-being?
c)Do you share your knowledge and experiences with the learning group or community members?
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d)How do you share the knowledge gained with other members of your community?
e)What helps you to learn more about new innovations and information? (Specify what the farmer
has learnt)
a)Listening to other farmers experiences and experiments
b)By doing and experimenting in own garden
c)Motivated by other farmers work and experiences
d)Learning workshops
Collaborative
actions/social
agency
Activities in groups Before- name
Activities in groups Now
E.g. savings,
church, learning
groups, coops,
farmers
associations,
work teams,
selling, inputs,
farmer centres,
water
committees …
Informed
decision making
Information used to choose
activities Before
Information used to choose
activities Now
e.g. Other
community
members,
learning in
groups, written
info, radio,
facilitators,
extension
officers, etc
Positive mindsets
Rate your mindset Before
Rate your mindset now
SCALE:0=less
positive about
the future;
1=the same;
2=more positive
about the
future; 3=much
more positive
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Appendix 7: Attendance registers
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Note: 1stpage of 6