Monitoring and Evaluation in Farmer Innovation Programme

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MONITORING AND EVALUATION
Inclusion of PID into larger training and implementation programmes
linked to food security
Activities
Set up learning groups for
each LM (4x30ind)
Elect and train 4 local food
security assistants per LM.
Each supports 30 hh and 1
group project
Run the learning group
training and interventions
Select 40 beneficiaries per LM
to receive RWH tanks
Link and work with local clinic
gardens, school gardens and
feeding schemes, NGO and
CBO initiatives
Towards the end of yr 1, select
beneficiaries for 2nd yr.....
Learning Groups
It starts with the generic (which is broad
enough to cover the overall topics in
most contexts);
Followed by an approximate
contextualisation (for instance, according
to the local natural resource base); and
Then eventually, specific training needs
are defined only once the learning group
has been formed and prior learning of the
participating households established.
For individuals supported by a group
Over a period of time in the
community
3-5hr sessions every 3-6 weeks
Always review previous session and
assess practical implementation
Practical demonstrations on site
Materials provided for
experimentation
Written materials and visual aids
(local language, posters, DVDs,
calendars etc)
Ideas and technologies introduced
Ongoing support by community level
facilitators
Learning needs assessments
Learning group process
Practical demonstrations and
farmer experimentation
-Demonstrations of new ideas
-Practical implementation in the
workshop
Example 2
Area
Implementation
uHa
za
Mas
hing
eni
Gez
obus
o
Vulis
aka
Mbhi
zane
Mafu
ndze
Aver
age
No of people attend
trg
in area
140
39
22
93
48
379 (total)
Trench beds
100%
100%
100%
83%
83%
94%
Mixed cropping/ crop
rotation
50%
50%
67%
56%
50%
50%
Clear paths,use of
kraal manure
100%
100%
100%
83%
83%
94%
RWH ditches
20%
20%
83%
83%
83%
64%
Liquid manure
90%
90%
100%
83%
83%
90%
Wind break
30%
20%
50%
33%
33%
31%
Mulching
0%
0%
67%
33%
33%
28%
Natural pest and
disease control
0%
0%
33%
83%
83%
49%
Farmer
experimentation
90%
90%
100%
83%
83%
90%
Foodfrom the garden
(no of times/ week)
2.5 x/wk
2 x/wk
2 x/wk
1.6 x/wk
2 x/wk
2.5 x/wk
Selling from garden
70%
40%
67%
17%
17%
50%
No of
trgs attended;
3 of 5
20%
36%
32%
37%
13%
31%
Fruit trees to homes
monitored
73%
90%
67%
77%
67%
78%
Comments per area
Large,
disparate grp,
some interest
Small grp,
waning
interest
Comm
garden,little
interest
Large
coherent
grp
Large, disparate
grp, little
interest
MONITORING AND EVALUATION; CA
PROGRAMME
CA indicators and scoring
VSA- Visual Soil Assessment
PES- Payment for Ecosystem services
Local monitoring of visual indicators
Indicators have been chosen
that can be monitored visually
and throughout the growth
season of the crop. The
intention is twofold:
To assess different indicators
for their reliability ,robustness,
sensitivity to change in
management practices and
To design a system that can be
locally implemented by
facilitators and farmer.
% soil cover at planting (From 0% - no
cover to 100% full cover); Cover of the soil
looking from above- can be crop residue,
weeds, mulch, grass etc)
% crop canopy cover at 6-8 weeks (From
0% - no cover to 100% full cover); Cover of
the soil looking from above- crop cover/
canopy)a new indicator
% Weed infestation(0%- very high weed
incidence, complete yield loss; to 100%- no
weeds zero yield loss)
% Pest occurrence (0%-very high infestation
, complete yield loss, to 100%- no insect
pests and zero yield loss)
% growth ; (germination, colour, height,
health)
% growth of cover crop (from 0% not
planted or not germinated to 100% full
germination and excellent growth) A new
indicator that has been included this year,
but not yet added to the overall score for
each participant
Values
Row Labels
Runoff
Average of
Cover
crops
Average of
%Cover
(at
planting)
Average of %
Weeds (0%)
high weed
infestation
to (100%) no
weeds,
Average
of % pests
(0%) bad-
(100%)
Average of %
growth
(germination,
colour,
height,
health)
Average of
Overall
score (10)
Lelatso Thuso
1
70%
10%
75%
85%
30%
5
Bulelwa Dzingwa
1
10%
15%
75%
85%
65%
6
Mahutlong Dodo
0
1%
10%
65%
90%
70%
5,9
Majaokbo Sabasaba
0
0%
8%
15%
90%
20%
3,3
Mamolelekeng Lebuoea
1
100%
10%
90%
80%
80%
6,5
Manapo Moshoeshoe
1
1%
5%
55%
80%
60%
5
Manyalleng Sikhosana
1
70%
10%
70%
85%
70%
5,9
Matshepo Futhu
1
60%
10%
55%
85%
65%
5,4
Mohajane Kanetsi
0
1%
10%
15%
80%
75%
4,5
Mongezi Bhekaphezulu
2
0%
8%
40%
80%
55%
4,6
Nkosiyamankwali
Maqungo
0
0%
5%
25%
80%
40%
4
Nokuphiwa Phekula
1
0%
5%
10%
90%
35%
3,5
Nthabiseng Moshoeshoe
1
0%
10%
35%
80%
65%
4,8
Siyabonga Maqungo
0
0%
5%
10%
80%
10%
2,6
Thabiso Dihollo
0
0%
13%
45%
78%
75%
5
Tsolonae Mapheele
2
55%
15%
63%
85%
58%
5,5
Grand Total
12
21%
10%
45%
83%
54%
4,8
CA Scores for Matatiele; 2015
Control plot scores are lower
on average than the trial plots
Trial plot scores for the 2nd
year are higher than for the
1st year. This is expected due
to better management of
trials by participant farmers as
they get used to the process
and are able to improve
0.00
1.00
2.00
3.00
4.00
5.00
6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
CA scores for control and trial plots; Stulwane
2 seasons
Control - Year 1
Control - Year 2
Trial plot - Year 1
Trial plot - Year 2
A comparison of scores over 2 seasons for Stulwane; Bergville
Visual indicator of SoilQualityVisual Score (VS)
0 =Poor conditions
1 =Moderate conditions
2 =Good conditions
Weighing VS Ranking
Soil Structure3
Soil porosity3
Soil colour2
Number and colour of soil mottles1
Earthworm counts2
Soil cover at planting 2
Crop cover at 6-8 weeks2
Soil depth2
Run-off 2
Ranking Score (sum of VS rankings) Max =38
VSA; Visual soil assessment
Crop emergence (% germination)3
Crop growth and height(%;
overall
growth and colour-
relative
height at time of assessment)
3
Weed infestation2
Crop yield3
Size and development of
root
system
2
Surfaceponding /water infiltration
2
Production costs
2
Ranking Score (sum of VS rankings) Max =22
CA monitoring
scores
VSA
Soil scores
VSA
plant scores
Yields
Above
average 7 >28 >15
3
-8.9 tons/ha
Average
5-6.9 11-28 7-15
1
-2.9tons/ha
Below
average 3-4.9<11 <7
1ton/ha
Combination of yields, CA scores and VSA
17
17
22
20
20
12
19
16
19
19
16
22
29
31
31
29
19
29
29
24
26
29
6.5
7.625
8.625
7.96
8.125
4.75
8.25
7.875
5.45
7.95
8.625
05 10 15 20 25 30 35
2,7
3,6
4,8
6,7
5,7
2,2
3,9
1
5,1
3
1,8
Year 2 Year 2 Year 2Year 2 Year 2 Year 2Year 2 Year 2 Year 2Year 2 Year 2
Bange
ni
Dlami
ni
Cazile
Zimba
Cupile
Buthel
ezi
Dlezak
he
Hlong
wane
Khule
kani
Dladla
Landil
e
Nsele
Maket
hi
Dladla
Mthol
eni
Dlami
ni
Phasa
zile
Sitheb
e
Thulisl
ie
Hlong
wane
Zaman
i
Dladla
Trial plot - Sum of Overall score
(10)
Trial plot - Sum of VSA Scores soil
Trial plot - Sum of VSA scores
plant
Gardening process
No (N= 12)
NOTES
Dedicated beds with paths6-
Not walking on beds, placing manure over entire bed
increases soil structure, fertility and water holding
capacity
Use kraal manure8
Making compost6-Mtubatuba
households have been taught composting
not used in other areas
Trench beds5
Key hole gardens1-Msingarocky area with severe water restrictions.
Liquid manure8
Natural pest control9Examples include: -Identifying pestsand pest
predators -using ash for ants -making brews from
indigenous plants-mixed cropping
Planting different vegetables 10 Also-planting and caring for seed and seedlings
-planting seed in trays, bottles nad
other containersfor
germination before transplanting.
Planting in different seasons3
Mixed cropping7
Water conservation8Including; -mulching -using grey water
-making run-off ditches at the top and bottom of the
garden
Assistance with infrastructure8Due to students being involved and part of an
organisation and through their express motivation
and help.
Seed saving6
Some images
Clockwise: Keyhole
garden in Msinga,
sask garden
(KwaHhoho), Banan
circle (KhulaVillage),
orange fleshed
sweet potato,
avocado trees,
mixed cropping-
maize, sorghum,
imfe, cowpeas and
cassava.
Before, we did not have a garden since there was
no water. With the help of the student we started
making a garden and got knowledge on rain water
harvesting. (Msinga)
We have learnt to produce our own food in stead
of just buying all the time. (Khula)
.
Information and relationship with the students
has helped us a lot. We are now planting our own
garden, saving money and eating a variety of
vegetables. The money we get from selling
vegetables is used for other household
needs.(KwaHhoho)
We have improved our care practises for
ourselves and our children; eating more fresh
food and treatment of infectious diseases such as
diarrhoea. (Msinga)
Thank you